Lyndon landmark, ‘The Old Ice House’, former commerce center and residence

By Paul Schmidt The distinct white painted concrete and brick building located at the corner of Washington and Third streets in Lyndon, Kan., is known as “The Old Ice More »

Unofficial primary election results for Osage County, Aug. 7, 2018

Here are the unofficial election results for Osage County in the Aug. 7, 2018, primary election, as released by the Osage County Election Officer. Write-in votes not included in More »

Osage County’s fair season winds down at Overbrook

Summer fair season comes to an end with the Overbrook Osage County Fair, Aug. 8-11, 2018, and this year’s fair promises its traditional competition, fun and entertainment. Following exhibits, More »

Hidden History: Building Burlingame bridge was just one of Switzler’s adventures

John Switzler’s namesake creek forms a natural city limits in northeast Burlingame, as shown in the foreground on a historical illustration and satellite photo. By Wendi Bevitt The Santa More »

Osage County Jail Log, Aug. 6 – Aug. 12, 2018

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

William ‘Bill’ Tillman, 64, El Dorado: Nov. 2, 1953 – Aug. 13, 2018

EL DORADO, Kan. – William “Bill” Tillman, 64, passed away on Monday, Aug. 13, 2018, at his home in El Dorado, Kan. He was born on Nov. 2, 1953, in Topeka, Kan., the son of John and June Miller Tillman.

Bill grew up in Vassar, Kan., and graduated from Lyndon High School, Lyndon, Kan., in 1971. He lived and raised his family in Leon, Kan., and had been in El Dorado for the last several years.

Bill worked in law enforcement, and had served as a park ranger for Pomona State Park and El Dorado State Park. He was a store manager for Wal-Mart, and had been a bluegrass musician for many years. He was a member of the Vassar United Methodist Church, the Kansas Prairie Pickers Association, the Vassar Polecats, and the Prospect Bluegrass Band.

Help Wanted: City of Osage City seeks Electric Distribution Supervisor

The City of Osage City, a community of 2,943 located in Northeast Kansas, desires to fill the position of Electric Distribution Supervisor. This non-exempt position is responsible for, but not limited, to a variety of supervisory, administrative, skilled, technical, and maintenance work in the planning, construction, operation, repair, maintenance, and replacement of the City electric distribution facilities and systems.

Minimum qualifications include completion of a two-year line school program or equivalent-type of training program, seven years of experience related to the construction, operation, repair, and maintenance of electrical distribution systems, a high school degree or GED, and Kansas CDL driver’s license with an insurable driving record. Previous supervisory experience is preferred, but not required for the position.

Salary will be commensurate with individual’s qualifications and experience. The City offers an excellent benefits package. Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest, application for employment, resume, list of five professional references, and salary history to the following:

City Clerk Terri Fultz
City of Osage City
201 S 5th Street, PO Box 250
Osage City, KS 66523-0250

Application for Employment forms may be downloaded at www.osagecity.com/Jobs.

Applications may be submitted electronically to [email protected] . Applications will be accepted until Friday, August 24, 2018 at 5:00 p.m. Questions can be directed to Joey Lamond, Director of Utilities, at 785-528-3714 or [email protected].

The full position description and benefit profile is available upon request. The City of Osage City, Kansas is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Help Wanted: City of Osage City seeks City Utility Clerk

The City of Osage City, a community of 2,940 located in Northeast Kansas, desires to fill the position of City Utility Clerk. This non-exempt position is responsible for but not limited to clerical work which includes maintenance of utility accounts, collection of payments, and providing information utilizing a high level of customer service both in person and by phone. Receives and records monetary transactions for city utilities and other services and fees. Posts payment to accounts, balances daily revenue to daily transactions. Experience should include a minimum of six months customer service experience, minimum of one year of experience working with cash transactions, experience with data entry and proficient with computer software and other office machines, must be able to work in a fast-paced environment, professional interaction with customers in person and via telephone. A high school degree or GED is required. Salary will be commensurate with individual’s qualifications and experience. The City offers an excellent benefits package. Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest, resume, list of five professional references, and salary history to the following: City Utility Clerk Search, City of Osage City, 201 S. 5th Street, PO Box 250, Osage City KS 66523-0250. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. on August 31, 2018. Questions can be directed to Terri Fultz, City Clerk at 785-528-3714 or [email protected]. A full position description and benefit profile is available upon request. The City of Osage City, Kansas is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Public Notice: Intersection closed, 4th and Ellinwood, Osage City, until August 20

The City of Osage City is notifying citizens and drivers that the intersection of 4th and Ellinwood streets will be closed from Monday, August 6 to Monday, August 20, 2018. Please use Safford Street for school access. Thank you!

For more information, contact Osage City Hall at 201 S. Fifth St., Osage City, Kan., 785-528-3714.

Help Wanted: Three Lakes Educational Cooperative seeks interpreter for deaf

Three Lakes Educational Cooperative is seeking full-time interpreter services for an elementary student in the West Franklin School District. The interpreter will work closely with the education team serving deaf and hard of hearing children. Contact Three Lakes Educational Cooperative for more information at 785-828-3113.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Service is helping others

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“It’s always best to help others in every way possible.”

That’s regardless whether they seek it, want it, realize they’re being helped or even think it’s unneeded.

Worst of all is when a service offering help, a reminder or a suggestion becomes offensive.

One is reminded: “It’s wrong if you don’t, it’s wrong if you do.”

In the sales profession that’s hit home numerous times through the decades.

Selling is helping. Whether that’s guiding one in the correct selection, finding exactly what is desired or giving advice to increase sales.

Service is the most important ingredient of selling anything. When all is said and done, that’s way more important than the price or the profit.

Many, sadly maybe most, don’t understand it and are out strictly out for the almighty buck. Apparently, that’s why when heartfelt service is given a buyer doesn’t understand the true meaning.

More than a quarter of a century ago, one customer became the best of friends. Every Friday morning, several hours were spent jointly developing advertising campaigns.

It was a work of enjoyment for both and increased that major business’ sales. There was always congeniality attempting to find better, more efficient methods to promote for higher returns.

Then, their management changed and all of the close service work with the previous most professional advertising coordinator went out the door.

Service on this end never altered, likely even expanded if possible, but the new people in charge became offended.

Evidently, they thought somebody was telling them how to do their job rather than helping, serving to expand their patronage.

Edward Jones named one of ‘50 Companies That Care’ and a great place to work

PEOPLE magazine and Great Place to Work have honored Edward Jones as one of People’s “50 Companies That Care,” a ranking based on the firm’s associate feedback about how their workplace makes a difference in their lives and their communities.

Edward Jones offers financial services through advisers at local branch offices throughout the United States and Canada (through its affiliate). Locally, financial adviser Robyn Williams maintains the Edward Jones branch office at 516 Market St., Osage City, Kan. Mandi Potter is the senior branch office administrator, and Jen Koch is the branch office administrator.

PEOPLE magazine’s rankings represent feedback from more than 4.5 million employees across the U.S. The magazine partnered with Great Place to Work, a global people analytics and consulting firm, to analyze employees’ survey feedback and to consider each organization’s benefits, philanthropic and community support. Edward Jones took the No. 5 spot on the list.

Lyndon landmark, ‘The Old Ice House’, former commerce center and residence

By Paul Schmidt

The distinct white painted concrete and brick building located at the corner of Washington and Third streets in Lyndon, Kan., is known as “The Old Ice Plant”. It is most associated with Lyndon resident and businessman Roscoe Gray (1890-1981) who, with his wife Nell, operated not only an ice plant in this structure, but also a slaughter house, locker plant, and an ice cream shop. There was also a private living quarters in the building.

Gray, with the help of two other men, built the concrete structure. Assisting with additions to the structure were boys from the vocational agriculture class at Lyndon High School, who wanted to earn some extra money in their free time.

In a June 12, 1980, article, Gray noted that the cement was mixed by hand and hauled by wheelbarrow. He also proudly told of the popularity of their most famous ice cream flavor, “brown bread.” In this article he revealed the secret* to their recipe.

Additionally, the roof garden portion was open every Saturday for roller skating parties with a big community dance held each Fourth of July.

The facility was in operation from 1941 to 1959. Gray, after his “first retirement” at the age of 72, went on to lay the rock for his private residence on Ash Street in Lyndon, as well as build a dozen fireplaces for homes in the Pomona area.

Source: The Osage County Historical Society, Lyndon, Kan. (Editor’s note: Please remember this building is privately owned; never enter private property without permission of the owner.)

*Rosoe and Nell’s secret to making their brown bread ice cream: The recipe is the same as any brown bread ice cream with the following two tricks. First, soak the grape-nuts in your ice cream mixture long enough – the grape-nuts should be very soggy. Second, instead of vanilla, flavor your mixture with caramel.

See more photos by Paul Schmidt below.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, July 30 – Aug. 3, 2018

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, July 30, 2018, through Aug. 3, 2018.

Lyndon Leaders stay involved in fairs and community over the summer

Lyndon Leaders judge livestock at Osage County Fair, from left, Breckyn Peterson, Kendall Young, Morgan Young, and Brynna Peterson.

By Garrett Shoup
Club Reporter

The Lyndon Leaders 4-H Club kicked off a great summer by participating in 4-H Camp and the Melvern and Osage County fairs.

The club had seven members attend 4-H Camp at Rock Springs. Upon returning was the Melvern fair, where the club entered their projects and participated in the parade with a float commemorating the Royals winning the World Series in 1985.

The following week, June 27, 2018, was the Osage County Fair, which involved many memorable events: project competitions, conference judging, livestock judging and livestock shows (just to name a few). The club also entered a float in the Osage County Fair Parade with a red, white and blue baseball-themed float called “Bats off to the Red, White and Blue!”

On July 9, many club members attended the 4-H Day Camp, held at Pomona Lake. Activities included making bird feeders and kindness rocks, learning about pollination, going on a scavenger hunt trail, and ending with a water fight.

At the end of July, the club did community service projects that included picking up Memorial Day flowers at the Lyndon Cemetery. They also pulled weeds in the Lyndon school landscaping. They celebrated their hard work with a cookout and pool party at the Lyndon Pool.

The Overbrook fair will be the last big event of the summer. It has been a very busy season, but one they won’t forget!

State fire marshal to investigate cause of early morning house fire in Carbondale

CARBONDALE, Kan. – Osage County Sheriff’s Office received a 911 call about a garage on fire early Thursday morning in Carbondale, Kan., but instead firefighters found a house fire that resulted in the home’s destruction.

The call at 4:02 a.m. Aug. 9, 2018, reported the fire at 324 Melody Lane, Carbondale, which is owned by Stephen Loschke, according to county land records.

Multiple fire districts assisted in the fire, those including those from Carbondale, Overbrook and Burlingame. The Kansas State Fire Marshal was called in to assist in the investigation.

No injuries were reported, but the house was a total loss, valued at $140,000. The fire marshal has determined the fire started in the garage but the cause remains under investigation.

Roundabout wreck reroutes Thursday morning traffic

A non-injury semi-truck accident shut down the roundabout at U.S. Highway 75 and state Highway 31 to one lane for about four hours early Thursday morning.

According to a report from the Osage County Sheriff’s Office, deputies responded to the accident at about 1 a.m., Aug. 9, 2018, when they found a semi-truck operated by Michael A. Cox, Grand Junction, Colo., had struck the roundabout while southbound on U.S. 75. The fuel tank was damaged during the accident, causing approximately 70 gallons of diesel fuel to spill.

U.S. 75 and K-31 were shut down to one lane for approximately four hours while flaggers directed traffic at the roundabout, about a mile north of Lyndon, Kan.

Other agencies and departments assisting included Osage County Fire District No. 5, Osage County Emergency Management, and Kansas Department of Transportation. The Osage County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the accident.

Washington Leadership Conference focuses on growth, leadership, community service

Representing MdCV FFA at the U.S. Capitol, Grace Bradley, Kaelin Criqui and Bayleigh Lacey.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Marais des Cygnes Valley FFA members Grace Bradley, Bayleigh Lacey and Kaelin Criqui, along with other FFA members from throughout the country, converged on Washington, D.C., this past summer to analyze their personal skills and interests, develop leadership skills, and create a meaningful community service plan that will make a difference in their home communities. More than 2,100 students participated in the 2018 Washington Leadership Conference, the second-largest student experience that the National FFA Organization hosts each year. MdCV FFA members attended from June 12 to 17, 2018.

MdCV FFA members spent a week under the guidance of professionals, counselors, and FFA staff members. In workshops, seminars and small groups, FFA members focused on identifying and developing their personal strengths and goals while undergoing comprehensive leadership training that will help them guide their local FFA chapters. Students also analyzed the needs of their communities back home, developed a wide-range and high-impact community service initiatives and implemented their plan with the help of their FFA chapter upon return home.

Unofficial primary election results for Osage County, Aug. 7, 2018

Here are the unofficial election results for Osage County in the Aug. 7, 2018, primary election, as released by the Osage County Election Officer. Write-in votes not included in totals.

Osage County AgWire: Disaster program compensates producers for forage losses

Producers in Osage County are eligible to apply for 2018 Livestock Forage Disaster Program benefits on native pasture, and improved pasture. LFP provides compensation to eligible livestock producers who suffer grazing losses for covered livestock due to drought on privately owned or cash leased land, or fire on federally managed land.

County committees can only accept LFP applications after notification is received by the national office of a qualifying drought, or if a federal agency prohibits producers from grazing normal permitted livestock on federally managed lands due to qualifying fire.

Eligible livestock producers must submit appropriate form and required supporting documentation no later than Jan. 30, 2019, for 2018 losses.

Fire crews dispatched to nursing home Monday; light fixture overheated

Fire crews were dispatched around 7 p.m. Monday, to report of a possible appliance fire at Osage Nursing Center, Osage City, but no fire was discovered.

According to a report from Osage County Fire District No. 2, crews from OCFD No. 2, OCFD No. 5 and OCFD No. 6 were dispatched to the nursing home located at 1017 Main St., for a report of a burning odor, believed to be coming from an electrical appliance.

Upon arriving at the scene, OCFD No. 2 firefighters located an overheated ballast in a light fixture. Responding automatic aid departments were cancelled. Department members were on scene for approximately 17 minutes, with no injuries reported.

Other agencies and departments that were on scene or assisted were Osage County EMS and Osage City Police Department.

OCFD No. 2 personnel reminds everyone to have working smoke detectors in their home and check them frequently. Also have an escape plan, practice it, and be prepared to use it in the event of a fire.

OCPR Update: Summer pours on the heat, but the cool pool is still full

OCPR-logo-red

Summer’s not over yet but the Osage City Aquatic Center is open until Labor Day, which is just around the corner. Osage City Parks and Recreation is also gearing up for fall sports, with signup dates announced for youth soccer and youth football.


Osage County’s fair season winds down at Overbrook

Summer fair season comes to an end with the Overbrook Osage County Fair, Aug. 8-11, 2018, and this year’s fair promises its traditional competition, fun and entertainment. Following exhibits, a carnival, kids’ games, everyone’s favorite fair finale is Overbrook’s annual parade on Saturday night, this year celebrating the theme of “Past and Present”. All area high school bands are encouraged to enter the annual “battle of the bands”, with cash prizes for winners.

Overbrook invites everyone to come and enjoy this year’s fair. Here’s the schedule.

Blaine Finch: Let’s talk straight

We’ve seen it all before. The past few years, dark money special interest groups have brought negative campaigning to our community. Their tactics are the same again this year. My opponent – and the special interests backing her – waited until the last minute to launch a smear campaign against me. Why? Because by waiting, they hope I won’t have time to respond to their attacks and give you the truth.

So, let’s talk straight.

My campaign is supported by people in our community, businesses, ag groups and health care organizations. When my opponent says I am funded by “lobbyists,” she’s talking about Kansas Farm Bureau, Kansas Livestock Association, Kansas Hospitals and other community groups that represent our families, our values and our jobs. The people backing my campaign are fully disclosed on campaign finance reports, meanwhile the special interest groups that like to throw mud in these campaigns get to hide in the shadows. They don’t live here, work here or raise their families here like you and I do.

I voted to fund our schools without a tax increase. That’s a fact. The legislature passed Senate Bill 423 this year, a plan to fund our schools within the existing budget and get the Supreme Court out of our classrooms. There were special interest groups pushing for a $1 billion plan, which would have required a tax hike. I opposed that plan – and I opposed any plan that would have required a tax increase – from the very beginning. My opponent isn’t telling you the truth.

I voted to override Brownback and put a stop to his tax favors. My opponent took a special favor appointment from Brownback, so it’s not a surprise that she would support his tax favors too. I don’t think it’s fair that certain corporations get to skirt their taxes while our families and businesses pick up their tab. That’s why I voted to override Brownback. What my opponent fails to mention is that overriding Brownback meant reinstating the ability for our farmers to write off loss carryover, for our families to deduct medical expenses when facing a catastrophic illness or injury, and for homeowners in our community to deduct their property taxes and mortgage interest. Don’t be fooled by her rhetoric.

I am pro-life with the voting record to prove it. I have voted for every pro-life bill that has come before the Legislature, including banning dismemberment abortions, defunding Planned Parenthood, and establishing that life begins at conception. I have never wavered on this issue and I never will. My opponent knows that. What she and the special interests backing her take issue with is the fact that I voted for a provision that would not give your doctor permission to lie to you. I don’t think it’s right to give anyone free license to lie.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas