032317-chenoa-casebier-winn

Entries now accepted for 2017 Wild About Kansas photo contest

First place photo in the recreation category of the 2016 Wild About Kansas photo contest was submitted by Chenoa Casebier, Osage City. PRATT – Don’t let Facebook and Instagram be the only More »

032317-ksu-vegetables

Winning the war: How to persuade children to eat more veggies

By Tiffany Roney MANHATTAN – Getting children to eat their vegetables might not be an endless battle if parents follow some research-based advice from a nutrition expert at Kansas State University. Getting More »

031817-prairie-Vermillionai

Hummingbirds will like new list of recommended flowers as much as Kansans

Cuphea Vermillionaire is a hummingbird and pollinator attractor. It’s on the 2017 Prairie Star Flower list of plants that performed well during a two-year trial at Kansas State University. By Mary Lou More »

030917-JE-Gardner-postcar2

Hidden History: Osage City businessman’s ‘can do’ attitude produces bountiful success

J.E. Gardner, grower of fancy tomatoes, Osage City, is shown with a wagon load of his produce in this ca. 1912 photograph from the collection of Gary Lowman. By Wendi Bevitt In More »

No burn day: High winds, dry conditions cause high fire danger

RED-FLAGDue to high fire danger today, Friday, March 24, 2017, all burn permits for Osage County are suspended. A “no burn” day means no outside burning is allowed in the unincorporated areas of Osage County as declared by Osage County Emergency Management. High fire danger means that fire control will be difficult and require extended effort.

The National Weather Service at Topeka has forecast that it will be breezy today, with a south wind of 15-20 mph and gusts up to 35 mph. Current low humidity and gusty winds triggered today’s burn ban, but NWS forecasts relief might come this afternoon with a 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after 11 a.m. and through Saturday morning.

This burn ban is in effect until 8 a.m. Saturday, March 25, 2017, but could be extended depending on weather conditions.

For more information, contact Bryce Romine, Osage County Emergency Management director at 785-828-3323.

Entries now accepted for 2017 Wild About Kansas photo contest

032317-chenoa-casebier-winn

First place photo in the recreation category of the 2016 Wild About Kansas photo contest was submitted by Chenoa Casebier, Osage City.

PRATT – Don’t let Facebook and Instagram be the only places you share your favorite wildlife, hunting, fishing, and other outdoor photos. Enter them in the 2017 Wild About Kansas photo contest. Hosted by Kansas Wildlife and Parks Magazine staff, the 5th annual contest will kick off March 23 and run through 5 p.m. on Oct 13, 2017. The contest is open to both Kansas residents and nonresidents, and there is no age limit.

Participants can enter up to three photos, given the photos are the participants’ original work and were taken in the state of Kansas. Winning entries will be featured in the 2018 March/April issue of Kansas Wildlife and Parks Magazine. To enter the contest, visit ksoutdoors.com/Services/Publications/Magazine/2017-Wild-About-Kansas-Photo-Contest.

Winning the war: How to persuade children to eat more veggies

032317-ksu-vegetables

By Tiffany Roney

MANHATTAN – Getting children to eat their vegetables might not be an endless battle if parents follow some research-based advice from a nutrition expert at Kansas State University.

Getting kids used to vegetables can start in the womb, said Richard Rosenkranz, associate professor of food, nutrition, dietetics and health.

Rosenkranz said research on pregnant rodents’ eating habits and their offspring’s taste preferences shows that children’s tastes start being shaped while they are still in the womb. Studies also show that pregnant women who eat more foods with bitter polyphenolics, such as kale and Brussels sprouts, have children who are more receptive to them when they try them for the first time.

“During pregnancy, an embryo and then a fetus is obtaining information about the outside world,” Rosenkranz said. “So, moms can set the stage for what their kids will want to eat before they’re even born.”

Infants can learn through repeated exposure and dietary variety. So Rosenkranz suggests focusing more on a child’s willingness to consume a food rather than relying on the facial expressions they give when eating it. For example, some infants may frown at bitter vegetables, but if they still swallow the food, their desire toward the food can be increased over time by continuing to serve it to them.

Babies as young as 6 months can detect what eating behaviors are normal and abnormal, Rosenkranz said. They react when their parents eat foods they don’t usually eat, and they take cues from parents as to what is and isn’t desirable.

“Babies start to think, ‘Why does he keep putting this stuff in front of me, but he never eats it?'” Rosenkranz said. “We’re being watched by our kids from very young ages.”

No burn day: High winds, dry conditions cause very high fire danger

RED-FLAGUpdate: The National Weather Service at Topeka has issued a red flag warning for today through 11 p.m. tonight due to gusty winds and dry fuels considered as fire weather. The warning covers Osage, Republic, Washington, Marshall, Nemaha, Brown, Cloud, Clay, Riley, Pottawatomie, Jackson, Jefferson, Ottawa, Dickinson, Geary, Morris, Wabaunsee, Shawnee, Douglas, Lyon, Franklin, Coffey, and Anderson counties.

*****

Due to very high fire danger today, Thursday, March 23, 2017, all burn permits for Osage County are suspended. A “no burn” day means no outside burning is allowed in the unincorporated areas of Osage County as declared by Osage County Emergency Management. Very high fire danger means that fire control will be difficult and require extended effort.

The National Weather Service at Topeka has forecast that southeast winds will become southerly and increase through the day. Sustained speeds near 30 mph with gusts around 40 mph are anticipated in the coverage area this afternoon and may not decrease much tonight. Humidity is expected to fall into the 30 percent range in the southern area.

This burn ban is in effect until 8 a.m. Friday, March 24, 2017, but could be extended depending on weather conditions.

For more information, contact Bryce Romine, Osage County Emergency Management director at 785-828-3323.

U.S. 75 rush hour accident injures Carbondale man, closes highway

Two passenger vehicles and a truck and semi-trailer were involved in a collision that sent a Carbondale man to the hospital with injuries and closed U.S. Highway 75 in Osage County for more than an hour Wednesday morning in the midst of commuter traffic.

According to a Kansas Highway Patrol report, Michael C. Finton, 47, Carbondale, was driving a 1999 Dodge Ram van southbound about 6:40 a.m. March 22, 2017, one-tenth mile north of 189th Street on U.S. 75, when his vehicle collided with a southbound 2013 Kenworth, driven by Joshua Paul Riggles, 22, Mayetta, that was stopped to turn east on 189th Street.  Finton’s vehicle then collided with a northbound 2004 Chevrolet Venture driven by Delbert L. Ramsey, 51, Lyndon.

Finton was transported to Stormont Vail Hospital, Topeka, with unspecified injuries, according to the KHP report. Neither Riggles or Ramsey were injured. All vehicle occupants were using safety restraints when the accident occurred.

After the accident, traffic was backed up more than a mile to the south, and southbound traffic was diverted to other roads while the scene was cleared and investigated. The Kansas Department of Transportation issued a road closure notice, encouraging drivers to choose other routes. The highway was reopened about 8 a.m. and returned to normal operating conditions.

KDHE provides funding for creation of new public water supply system

System to serve Osage County RWD No. 5, Douglas County RWD No. 5

TOPEKA, Kan. – Construction of a new public water supply system, along the Kansas River east of Lawrence, is scheduled to begin in March 2017. Treated water will be utilized by Douglas County Rural Water District No. 5 and Osage County Rural Water District No. 5, which serve rural populations in southwest Douglas County and northeast Osage County. The new system will ensure a long term water supply source for the district’s approximate 5,500 customers.

Financing for construction of the public water supply system was made possible through a loan provided by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. Using the Kansas Public Water Supply Loan Fund, KDHE has provided a nearly $20 million loan, in which 30 percent of the principal amount will be forgiven.

“Having a long-term reliable water supply is vital to Kansas communities,” said KDHE Secretary Susan Mosier. “Through the Kansas Public Water Supply Loan Fund to local water districts, we are able to improve and maintain our state’s water infrastructure.”

“The management and patrons of our two water districts are most grateful to KDHE and its Public Water Supply Loan Fund, and especially for 30 percent loan forgiveness,” said Larry Wray, manager of Douglas County Rural Water District No. 5. “Their support has been instrumental in making this project possible. Having such a dependable supply of good, fresh water will provide water security in our districts for many years to come.”

The full system will include a water treatment plant, wells, a storage tank, water transmission mains, a water tower, and a pump station.

Consider the senior center to help spring clean your health

By Stephanie Watson

Spring is in the air, and that means an end to being cooped up inside. I’m so excited for warmer weather; by the time you read this my potatoes will be in the garden. I mentioned to my children that we should open up the house and do some spring cleaning. I received a smart remark from “Mr. Know it All” (teenager), he says to me “maybe you should consider spring cleaning your health.” I believe he was referring to my stash of girl scout cookies, peanut M&M’s, snicker bars, and a few miscellaneous other bags of stuff I truly need, under the bathroom sink. Why the bathroom? I’m sure any momma with multiple children could answer that question.

You know though, he is right we could all do a wee bit of spring cleaning toward our good health. I have a few suggestions, clean the refrigerator, dispose of anything that is outdated. Don’t forget to clean out your medicine cabinets.

The Osage County Sheriff’s Office will be at the Osage County Senior Center at 11:30 a.m. April 19 for a “Drug Take Back Day.” The sheriff’s office aims to provide a safe, convenient and responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs, while also educating the general public about the potential for abuse and medications.

Also, get outside – it is time to change up our exercise routine. There is never enough said about walking and drinking lots of water.

And, join us at the center for our weekly activities. Stop by at 604 Market St., Osage City, or for more information, call 785-528-4906.

No burn day: High winds, dry conditions cause fire danger

RED-FLAGDue to high fire danger today, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, all burn permits for Osage County are suspended. A “no burn” day means no outside burning is allowed in the unincorporated areas of Osage County as declared by Osage County Emergency Management. High fire danger means that fire control will be difficult and require extended effort.

The National Weather Service at Topeka has forecast that today will be mostly cloudy, with a high near 56 and southeast winds at 10 to 15 mph.

This burn ban is in effect until 8 a.m. March 23, 2017, but could be extended depending on weather conditions.

For more information, contact Bryce Romine, Osage County Emergency Management director at 785-828-3323.

Early morning fire damages rural Osage County residence

CARBONDALE, Kan. – Local fire departments were called to a fire at a rural Carbondale residence early Tuesday morning, where a house and garage sustained significant damage.

According to an Osage County Sheriff’s Office press release, a call came in at 4:26 a.m. March 21, 2017, about a house fire at 16129 S. Berryton Rd., Carbondale. The home belongs to Brian Wiggans.

Osage County fire districts No. 1, No. 5, and No. 4, and Scranton Fire Department responded to the fire. No injuries were reported.

The fire is being investigated by the sheriff’s office and the Kansas State Fire Marshal. The cause of the fire was undetermined at the time the press release was issued.

Red Cross was notified to assist the family as needed.

Osage County Jail Log, March 12 – March 18, 2017

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Notice: Farmland For Lease By Sealed Bid

Notice: Farmland For Lease By Sealed Bid

The City of Osage City is accepting sealed bids on farmland located on the W 1/2, SW 1/4 30-16-15 known as the Lafferty/Thompson property as follows:

  • 23.8 tillable acres for 2017 crop production only, no fall planted crops allowed
  • Sealed bid on dollars per acre basis
  • One (1) year lease due to planned airport construction in 2018
  • Lessee to fertilize tillable acres
  • Lessee to control noxious weeds

The City of Osage City will accept sealed bids in the office of City Clerk Terri Fultz at 201 South 5th Street, PO Box 250, Osage City, KS 66523 until 1:00 p.m. on Friday March 31, 2017.  The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids.

Hensley: Court links student achievement to quality teachers, support staff

By Senate Democratic Leader Anthony Hensley

During a budget debate last week, Senate President Susan Wagle offered an amendment that would cut K-12 budgets by $68 million. She argued students would not be impacted because school boards would have to cut “non-classroom” expenses. This is not true.

The Kansas Supreme Court’s most recent school finance ruling makes it clear that all cuts to schools reduce student achievement, especially when they eliminate teachers and support staff.

Cuts to K-12 budgets have eliminated more than 1,000 teaching positions along with nearly 1,000 support staff positions including school nurses, social workers, librarians, school counselors, speech therapists, and others. Additionally, the cuts led to discontinuation of many extracurricular activities because the districts could no longer afford to hire coaches. For the same reason, programs such as one-on-one tutoring were removed.

Quality teachers, support staff, and extracurricular activities directly impact student achievement, the Court concludes. They cite testimony of expert witness Dr. Eric Hanushek who said, “The most important factor in influencing student achievement is the quality of the teacher.” Without enough teachers, class sizes grew, and the larger class sizes prevented teachers from being able to spend more time with each student.

The Court notes the impact of class size on achievement when they write, “Smaller class sizes…are an effective tool for increasing student achievement.” Further, they indicate that without quality teachers and necessary support staff, school districts struggle to meet achievement goals outlined by the Rose standards.

But, the Court also notes that pay cuts and stagnant salaries make it difficult to recruit and retain quality teachers. This means it is critical for school districts to not only receive enough funding to create additional teaching positions, but to also increase salaries to attract new teachers to their districts.

The Court’s opinion is encouraging, and the defeat of Sen. Wagle’s amendment means Legislators understand what it’s going to take to ensure all Kansas children have access to a quality education.

No burn day: High winds, dry conditions make extreme fire danger

RED-FLAGDue to very high fire danger today, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, all burn permits for Osage County are suspended. A “no burn” day means no outside burning is allowed in the unincorporated areas of Osage County as declared by Osage County Emergency Management. Very high fire danger means that fire control will be difficult and require extended effort.

Very high rangeland fire danger is expected across the northern and central counties of the coverage area this afternoon, with the greatest danger along the I-70 corridor through the mid and late afternoon hours. Minimum humidity will drop into the 25 to 35 percent range and northeast surface winds will increase to 15 to 20 mph with some gusts up near 30 mph. Any planned burns may become uncontrollable wild fires.

This burn ban is in effect until 8 a.m. March 22, 2017, but could be extended depending on weather conditions.

For more information, contact Bryce Romine, Osage County Emergency Management director at 785-828-3323.

Filings in Osage County Courthouse March 13 – March 17, 2017

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse March 13 through March 17, 2017.

Kansas wildfires: 4-Hers, volunteers rally to save orphaned calves

Foster families providing care until producers can rebuild facilities

MEADE, Kan. – A Kansas 4-H club has rallied supporters in the state and surrounding states to take in orphaned calves whose mothers were victims of the wildfires that raced across several western counties last week.

Rachelle Schlochtermeier, one of the parent leaders of the Four Leaf Clover Club in Meade County, said the response to the club’s idea to “do something” for families affected by the fires has been overwhelming.

“We have been hearing from people all over the state of Kansas, even people from Michigan and Missouri and Oklahoma,” she said. “People want to make a donation or find out how they can help.”

Schlochtermeier and another parent, Erin Boggs, helped their 4-H club get organized, and have seen clubs in Elkhart, Ness City and Russell join the effort to rescue orphaned calves and place them in good homes. More groups are joining in all the time, Schlochtermeier said.

The volunteers are spending their own time and money traveling to pick up calves, assess their condition and arrange for their care.

As of last weekend, the groups have saved 85 orphaned calves and placed them under care. Once the calves are healthy – and producers have rebuilt barns, fences and other facilities – the club members will return them to their original home.

The fires came at a particularly difficult time for cattle producers, a time when many cows had just given birth. One rescued calf was just a few days old, Schlochtermeier said, and was still nursing. Fortunately for the calf, it was able to get colostrum from its mother, which will help its chances of future health.

Many other calves are 2-3 months old. All of the rescued calves will receive an antibiotic and B12 vitamin, as well as milk replacement, often bottle fed by the volunteers. Schlochtermeier said the Hillsboro Veterinary Clinic has provided some medical care.

ECKAN CEO responds to President’s proposed cuts to community services

Ed. note: Five hundred leaders, including representatives of East Central Kansas Economic Opportunity Corporation (ECKAN), gathered in Washington, D.C., March 16, 2017, when details of President Trump’s proposed budget were made public. Richard Jackson, Chief Executive Officer of ECKAN, responded with the following statement.

By Richard Jackson, ECKAN CEO

Despite everything President Trump has promised, this is a radical right, Washington insider’s budget that does not reflect priorities that make American stronger. President Trump’s budget is tone deaf to small town mayors, the people who elected him, and every community across the U.S.

Cutting Community Services Block Grants, flexible local dollars that create opportunity for over 15 million people in every community in America, a program with bipartisan support in Congress, one that has already shifted power from the feds to local communities, harms America. Locally, the proposed cuts would prove devastating to the small communities that ECKAN serves. ECKAN programs such as food and nutrition, which distributed over 250,000 pounds of food to over 2,000 food insecure families, would undoubtedly be at risk. Likewise, ECKAN’s Stepping Stones program, which provides case management to folks working hard to lift themselves out of poverty would be devastated by these cuts. Other programs such as rental housing, Section 8 housing, volunteer engagement, Youth Action Council, and Head Start programs would also be harmed by these proposed cuts.

Perhaps, the most catastrophic cut found in the proposed budget is the cut to LIHEAP. LIHEAP is a major source of funding for ECKAN’s weatherization program. Cuts to this vital program would negatively affect hundreds of low-income residents across 14 Kansas counties. How does making hundreds of seniors, disabled people, and disadvantaged families choose between heating and eating by striking LIHEAP make America strong again? How does calling for the elimination of America’s most successful energy conservation program, Weatherization Assistance Program, make America first?

Make no mistake about it, this budget does not put America first; it puts Americans last.

Burning Dates Extended for Osage City, Kansas

The City of Osage City will allow the burning of grass, weeds, leaves, waterways, yards, gardens, and fence lines between the days of Wednesday, March 1, 2017, through Friday, March 31, 2017, provided conditions are favorable; the County does not have a burn ban in place, wind speed is not more than 10 mph; a water hose is securely fastened to an operable water faucet and the length of the hose available is sufficient to reach the area where the controlled burn is occurring; no fire is left unattended; and no burning is to be performed on or intersect the sidewalks, streets or gutters of City streets. For more information call City Hall at 528-3714.

Burlingame Community Library seeks board members from within city limits

stackofbooks3topThe Burlingame Community Library is looking to add new members to their Library Board. Potential members must live within the Burlingame city limits. If interested, please email a short letter of interest to director@burlingame.lib.ks.us.​

Notice: City of Osage City, summer hours to begin for trash pickup

Notice
City of Osage City
Summer Hours Trash Pickup

The City of Osage City Sanitation Department will begin working summer hours from 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. starting Monday, March 20, 2017.

Please have your carts at the curb by 7:00 a.m. on your regular day of pickup service.

For more information, call Osage City Hall at 528-3714.

No burn day: High winds, dry conditions make extreme fire danger

RED-FLAGDue to very high fire danger today, March 19, 2017, all burn permits for Osage County are suspended. A “no burn” day means no outside burning is allowed in the unincorporated areas of Osage County as declared by Osage County Emergency Management. Very high fire danger means that fire control will be difficult and require extended effort.

Very high fire danger is expected across the area today, with wind gusts to 30 mph expected this afternoon.

This county burn ban is in effect until 8 a.m. March 20, 2017, but could be extended depending on weather conditions.

For more information, contact Bryce Romine, Osage County Emergency Management director at 785-828-3323.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Encouragement follows fire devastation

buchmanhead“There’s nothing more powerful than fire. Nothing’s more destructive than fire.”

Uncontrollable acts of nature, tornadoes and flooding are dreadful with lost lives and property.

Fire is different as seen possible to restrain. It is not when ample fuel powered by unrelenting wind expands dominance.

Despite modern technology, when fire and wind pair, there is no stopping until one or the other ceases.

Point came to haunt again with the biggest wildfire on record in Kansas last week. It was just a year after a previous record setting blaze of destruction in the state.

Incomprehensible to those who’ve never experienced situations when dry foliage, spark and gust come together.

Just one time when a planned Flint Hills burn goes awry with wind’s increased speed and change of direction there’s never doubt of fire’s power.

Losses yet incalculable from those most recent wildfires continue mounting with recovery efforts underway.

Wind calming and sparse moisture promise reprieve while further devastation fear remains for reigniting accompanied by unyielding nature.

Horrification is most decisive as human lives are lost when unable to move out of runaway fire’s deadly path.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | news@osagecountyonline.com | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas