MdCV FFA hosts family and friends for annual chapter banquet

MdCV officers, new and retiring, front from left, Chloe Volkman, Alaina Marsh, State FFA Sentinel Garrett Craig, Kaelin Criqui, Kathryn Vaught, back, Danny Rice, MdCV FFA advisor, Bayleigh Lacey, Sadie More »

Free garage sale ads on Osage County News!

Osage City welcomes shoppers for citywide garage sales, April 19-20, 2019

Osage City is opening its garage doors, driveways and yards to shoppers Friday and Saturday. The town’s citywide garage sales will be April 19 and 20, 2019, hosted by More »

Kid cooks heat up the competition at Smoke in the Spring Kids-Q

A young chef carefully turns in her entry for Kids-Q to KCBS reps, from left, Dave and Peg Rogers, Linda and Dennis Polson, Mark Collier, and not pictured, Kim More »

Clark Crew wins third grand championship at Osage City

Travis Clark, Clark Crew BBQ, left, accepts his grand champion awards Saturday from contest organizer Corey Linton, right, and Amy Linton. OSAGE CITY, Kan. – A Yukon, Okla., barbecue More »

A Cowboy’s Faith: Exceeding speed always hazardous

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Driving too fast is dangerous to all concerned.”

Preface conversation with legitimacy of thoughts having received too many “traffic citations.” Friend mentor decades ago, Warren Gilman, Chamber of Commerce leader, got “tickets” on occasion. Each one just shrugged off: “They’re manmade laws and can change upon a wisp.”

Certainly, that’s true with frequency that speed limits have gone up and down. Likewise, varying stringency, leniency, inconsistency of enforcement, such enforcers often exceed posted signs.

Still, no question, wrecks increase with heavy footed automotive driving.

Interesting though speeding on roadways was considered dangerous resulting in fines long before cars were invented.

If President Grant were alive today, he’d probably have quite a few points on his license by now.

While Grant was president in 1866, accidents forced Washington, D.C., authorities to crack down on speeders. For policeman William West, the last straw was when a woman and six-year-old child were seriously injured on West’s corner by a “driver of fast horses.”

The next day, West caught Grant’s buggy going at “a furious pace.” America’s top elected official was immediately pulled over.

“Mister President,” said West, “I want to tell you that you were violating the law by driving at reckless speed. It is endangering the lives of the people who have to cross the street.”

Eastern Kansas grazing school to be held in Ottawa

Rotation grazing is recognized as a way to utilize pastures and forages more efficiently. A collaboration of experts from K-State Research and Extension, Natural Resource Conservation Service and the University of Missouri are joining together to offer a two-day grazing school to present information about grazing in the classroom and in nearby pastures.

This year’s event marks the 8th annual grazing school and will be held April 24 and 25, 2019, at the Franklin County Fairgrounds, Celebration Hall, 220 W. 17th St., Ottawa, Kan. The event will feature special presenters, Mark Green, Missouri NRCS, and Wesley Tucker, University of Missouri Extension Service, who will be sharing their expertise. Green will discuss fencing options and water systems and development. Tucker will present the economics of grazing and will help producers with layout and design of grazing paddocks.

MdCV FFA hosts family and friends for annual chapter banquet

MdCV officers, new and retiring, front from left, Chloe Volkman, Alaina Marsh, State FFA Sentinel Garrett Craig, Kaelin Criqui, Kathryn Vaught, back, Danny Rice, MdCV FFA advisor, Bayleigh Lacey, Sadie McGowin, Koby Vanderpool, Wyatt Lingenfelter, and Frank Warner. MdCV FFA photo.

The annual Marias des Cygnes Valley FFA Chapter Banquet was held on Friday April 11, 2019. Approximately 100 people, including members, families, and friends, gathered in the Melvern Community Center for pork chops and a potluck meal, awards and the installation of the 2019-2020 chapter officers.

An invocation from Frank Warner was followed by the dinner consisting of pork chops, sponsored by Don and Janise Hook, and side dishes and desserts brought by our members and their families. Following the dinner and chapter scrapbook video produced by Kathryn Vaught, the chapter officers president Chloe Volkman, vice-president Brookelyn Janssen, secretary Kathryn Vaught, treasurer Bayleigh Lacey, reporter Frank Warner, sentinel Alaina Marsh, and advisor and KSU student intern Cassandra Ebert began with opening ceremonies. KobyVanderpool, chapter student-council representative, introduced special guest speaker Garrett Craig, Kansas FFA Sentinel, with his speech “Focusing and Committing to Your Talents and Passion”.

Other guests included members of the USD 456 Board of Education, Marais des Cygnes Valley High School Principal Ben Gordon, members of the MdCV Ag Education Advisory Board, Joe and Shirley Litchtenauer, Dale and Peggy McCurdy, Jeff and Merrilyn Casten, Jennifer and Peter Roy, Janae and Caleb McNally, Jarah and Mike Hauger, and Joe and Shirley Lichtenauer.

How would you like that cooked? Auto show well done in downtown Osage City

Approximately 270 entrants participated in the 15th Annual Cruis’n & Cook’n Auto Show, Saturday, April 13, 2019, in downtown Osage City. Results of the show, hosted by the Twin Lakes Cruisers, are as follows:

Osage City welcomes shoppers for citywide garage sales, April 19-20, 2019

Free garage sale ads on Osage County News!

Osage City is opening its garage doors, driveways and yards to shoppers Friday and Saturday. The town’s citywide garage sales will be April 19 and 20, 2019, hosted by the Osage City Chamber of Commerce.

The Chamber has produced at map that lists sales all over town and designates which section of town and the types of goods for sale. Maps will be available at Casey’s and other local businesses Friday and Saturday.

Donations received for listing sales and for advertising on the map are used for a scholarship for a graduating senior from Osage City High School.

For more information, contact Tricia Gundy, Osage City Chamber garage sale committee chairperson, at 785-528-3301, or Peterson Assisted Living, 629 Holliday St., Osage City.

Remember you can post your own garage sale for free on Osage County News at www.osagecountyonline.com/place-your-own-garage-yard-sale-ad.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, April 1 – April 5, 2019

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, April 1 through April 5, 2019.

Osage County Jail Log, April 9 – April 13, 2019

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Kid cooks heat up the competition at Smoke in the Spring Kids-Q

A young chef carefully turns in her entry for Kids-Q to KCBS reps, from left, Dave and Peg Rogers, Linda and Dennis Polson, Mark Collier, and not pictured, Kim Collier, as local judges wait in anticipation. Jan Williams photo.

It’s a part of Smoke in the Spring that most folks don’t know is going on Friday evening, but you can bet there are some young cooks that have a watchful eye on their smokers for about three hours while everyone else is out enjoying the community barbecue party.

In the annual Kids-Q Competition, kid chefs compete in two age divisions, 10 and younger, and 11 and older. The cooks must be sponsored by one of the competition teams and cook their entries on site. At the cook’s meeting, the cooks are each given one pound of ground beef, donated this year by Allen Meat Processing, Allen, Kan., to cook however they choose.

Others who make Kids-Q possible are 24 local celebrity judges, who are instructed on the Kansas City Barbeque Society judging process before the kids’ turn-in time of 8 p.m. The kids contest is not a KCBS sanctioned part of Smoke in the Spring, but it is conducted according to KCBS rules and scoring. Judges are sequestered in the community building during the judging process.

At turn-in, the chefs bring their samples to the turn-in window at the community building, where the judging is conducted. The samples go to one of four tables of six judges each, where they are scored according to appearance, taste, and texture or tenderness. The judging process is the same as the sanctioned contest the next day.

Here are placing and payout results for the Smoke in the Spring Kids-Q held April 12, 2019:

Clark Crew wins third grand championship at Osage City

Travis Clark, Clark Crew BBQ, left, accepts his grand champion awards Saturday from contest organizer Corey Linton, right, and Amy Linton.

OSAGE CITY, Kan. – A Yukon, Okla., barbecue team has become the first team to be a three-time grand champion at the Smoke in the Spring State BBQ Championship, at Osage City, Kan, after claiming that title again Saturday.

Clark Crew BBQ, with head cook Travis Clark, has been sweeping barbecue championships across the Midwest the last few years, and added another Smoke in the Spring State BBQ Championship to that tally after a tight competition among top cooks on April 13, 2019, at Jones Park, in Osage City. The team previously won grand champion at the Osage City competition in 2016 and 2017.

Clark Crew squeezed out last year’s grand champs, Hogline BBQ, Dustin and Mary Reese, of Owatonna, Minn., who claimed reserve grand champion this year. Coming in third overall was Hunka Hunka Burnin’ Rub, Chris Hoisington, of Olathe, Kan.

Bernadine C. Dreher, 79, Tecumseh: June 7, 1939 – April 13, 2019

TECUMSEH, Kan. – Bernadine “Bernie” C. Dreher, 79, of Tecumseh, Kan., left this earth on April 13, 2019, surrounded by her family. She was born on June 7, 1939, in Topeka, Kan., the daughter of Leo Francis and Georgia Frances (Koehler) Donahue. They preceded her in death.

Bernie taught ceramics for a period of time. When Fred, husband of 61 years, retired from Santa Fe, they made ceramics and stoneware pieces, attending craft shows to sell them for more than 25 years. She was a member of Mater Dei Assumption Catholic Church.

Help Wanted: Osage City UMC seeks Children, Youth and Families Coordinator

First United Methodist Church of Osage City is seeking applicants who are committed Christians with a passion for children and youth to fill the position of program coordinator of Children, Youth and Family (CYF). The Coordinator will work to create, develop and maintain ministries that focus on Children, Youth and Families as they relate to our mission to intentionally share God’s love, so people will come to know Christ, and serve as disciples for the healing of the world. This is a part-time, 20 hours per week, salaried position which includes both weekday and weekend responsibilities to encourage and facilitate spiritual growth of children youth and families. Interested applicants are invited to submit a cover letter and resume to the church, attention Gwen Crane, Church Secretary, at [email protected].

Help Wanted: Osage City UMC seeks Choir Director

First United Methodist Church of Osage City is seeking applicants who have a spiritual calling as a Choir Director. The Choir Director will work with the pastor and accompanists to select music and lead our choir to inspire worship through music on Sundays, for special occasions and services.

The successful candidate will recruit choir members, work with congregants and musicians, and may arrange for musical guests during certain worship services. During summer months (June-August) the director will oversee scheduling and recruitment of special music.

This is a part-time position of 4-5 hours a week. Interested applicants are invited to submit a cover letter and resume to the church, attention Gwen Crane, Church Secretary, at [email protected].

Albert Smith, 95, Overbrook: July 17, 1923 – April 8, 2019

OVERBROOK, Kan. – Albert Smith, 95, passed away on Monday, April 8, 2019, at Midland Hospice House, Topeka, Kan. He was born on July 17, 1923, on the family farm north of Osage City, Kan., the son of Virgil and Florence Anderson Smith Sr.

Albert had lived near Richland, Kan., before moving to a farm north of Overbrook, Kan. Albert served in the United States Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd Class from 1943 to 1946 during World War II. He had farmed for 68 years.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Blaze best for grass

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“That’ll stop the smoke.”

Longtime farmer friend accessed another pour down walking out of church.

For several days, Flint Hills had been ablaze with smoke apparent in the sky every direction.

It was a haze drawing critical attention from a handful or so of large urban centers.

They were offended at the contamination and fright of hazardous damage to the environment.

Such a controversial issue has been pasture burning since beginning as necessary range management tool.

Fact is prairies were free of most intruders until ranchers started productive grazing programs.

Nature took care of itself, it’s said; lightning started fires, pastures burned, lush grass grew. Buffalo, deer, antelope, prairie chicken and creatures of the wild thrived on native rangeland.

Farmers and ranchers started planting trees of various sorts for windbreaks, home shade and landscaping.

Worthwhile endeavor until wildlife and wind were seeding trees all over the lands.

Then environmentalists encouraged various additional herbaceous plantings in attempting to slow land erosion.

“Helpful” plants soon were nature spread beyond eroding draws, washouts and steep acreage into land never intended.

Eat Well to Be Well: Hormones in beef – Should you worry?

When it comes to food, everyone has an opinion and each of us has many questions. Take beef for instance. It seems you either eat it or you don’t. And if you choose not to, one concern for avoiding it could be the fear of hormones in beef.  How do we know beef is safe to eat and why are hormones used anyway?

The ‘beef’ over eating meat

The sensationalism surrounding beef being filled with hormones is just that – an over exaggeration.  It’s important to understand all living things – plants, animals, and people – produce hormones. Hormones are special chemical messengers necessary for controlling most major body functions from hunger to reproduction. The hormones used in beef production are only those that are also naturally produced by cattle. They include estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone, as well as synthetic versions of them.

Why are hormones used?

The simple answer why cattle are implanted with hormones is to help the cattle grow faster. These growth-promoting hormone pellets, about the size of an Advil tablet, contain a small amount of hormones and are put under the skin on the backside of the ear – cattle ears are never used in food production, thus they do not end up in the food we eat.

If you’re worried about the amount of hormones in these pellets, don’t be. The amount is a fraction of the natural production of mature bulls or heifers. A 1,300 pound steer is implanted with 30 milligrams of estrogen to last 150 days and that’s it. Compare this to the amount of ingested hormones a woman on birth control pills takes for months or years. Also, hormones don’t build-up in the cow’s system so there is no residue from the pellets in your meat.

These hormones not only help the animal gain weight faster, but they also have less of an impact on the environment than a non-treated animal. This means less time, food, and water are used to finish the animal, making them less expensive to produce, a cost-savings passed on to us as consumers. Research from Iowa State University found that hormone implants have no effect on beef quality or safety.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, March 25 – March 29, 2019

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, March 25 through March 29, 2019.

Burn ban in Osage County Thursday; NWS issues wind advisory

All burn permits in Osage County are suspended for today, Thursday, April 11, 2019, due to high fire danger caused by windy conditions. This is a no burn day with no outside burning allowed in Osage County. The permit suspension will be in effect until 8 a.m. April 12, 2019, but could be extended.

Osage County Emergency Management advises that the rangeland fire danger index will be in the high category this afternoon. High fire danger means fires can start quickly, spread furiously, and burn intensely. All outdoor burning should be avoided.

The National Weather Service has issued a wind advisory in effect from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. today. South winds 20 to 30 mph with gusts of 45 mph are forecast. A wind advisory means that sustained winds from 30 to 39 mph or gusts from 45 to 57 mph are likely. Steps should be taken to secure any lawn furniture or light weight objects. Smaller loose items may be blown around. Use extra caution when driving, which could be especially hazardous for those traveling in high profile vehicles.

For more information about the burn ban, contact Osage County Emergency Management at 785-828-3323.

Osage County Jail Log, March 31 – April 6, 2019

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Burn ban Wednesday: Wind and warm temperatures add up to fire danger

Osage County Emergency Management has issued a burn ban countywide for April 10, 2019. No outside burning is allowed, and all burn permits are suspended. The ban is in effect until 8 a.m. April 11, and may be extended.

A wind advisory is in effect throughout the day until 7 p.m., with south winds expected at 20 to 30 mph with gusts of 40 to 50 mph. National Weather Service predicts it will be mostly cloudy today with a high near 83. Tonight is expected to remain partly cloudy, with a low around 48; windy, with a south wind 25 to 30 mph decreasing to 15 to 20 mph after midnight. Winds could gust as high as 35 mph during the evening hours.

For more information about the burn ban, contact Bryce Romine, Osage County Emergency Management director, at 785-828-3323.

Barbecue again the highlight for Osage City’s Smoke in the Spring

Taste of Osage City gives everyone an opportunity to taste what’s cooking at the Smoke in the Spring State BBQ Championship. That when Jones Park turns into a “giant outdoor smorgasbord” and community party, beginning at 5 p.m. Friday, April 12, 2019. Along with the KCBS sanctioned barbecue competition on Saturday will be a downtown car show. Wayne White photo.

By Frank J. Buchman

“There’s going to be lots of smoke in the air.”

It’s the 16th annual Smoke in the Spring State Barbeque Championship, April 12 and 13, at Osage City.

“At Jones Park, there’ll be a full slate of activities for everybody,” announced Corey Linton. “But good eating of the most distinctive smelling gourmet will be the highlight for most.”

As event coordinator and dedicated enthusiast, Linton is director of the Osage City Parks & Recreation, which sponsors the barbecue championship.

“Over the past 15 years, Smoke in the Spring has expanded into one of the Midwest’s premier barbecue contests. There’ll be teams and judges from 20 states, as far away as Hawaii,” Linton said.

Sanctioned by the Kansas City Barbeque Society, Smoke in the Spring is designated as a state championship. More than $25,000 will be awarded in prize money. This year, the competition received a 2019 Smokin’ with Smithfield Grant of $3,000 to go towards awards.

USD 421 hires Marcotte as new superintendent

Brad Marcotte

LYNDON – The Lyndon USD 421 Board of Education filled the district’s opening for a new superintendent on Friday, but created a vacancy at the high school at the same time. The board announced today that it hired Lyndon High School Principal Brad Marcotte as superintendent of the district.

Marcotte will replace USD 421 Superintendent Charles Coblenz, who is retiring at the end of this school year. The board began its search for a new superintendent after Coblentz announced his retirement plans. The board made its decision at a special meeting April 5, 2019, after interviewing four candidates during special meetings last week.

Coblentz has worked the Lyndon district for two years; he had previously served as superintendent in Easton, Kan., since 2006. Upon retirement, he will have been 44 years as an educator. He said he was looking forward to spending more time with his family and toward new opportunities outside the field of education.

Marcotte has been LHS principal since 2005, after he had earned a master’s degree in building leadership at Emporia State University in 2004. He was a graduate of Northern Heights High School and received a bachelor’s degree from ESU. He began his teaching career at North Lyon County as a middle school and high school science teacher, and spent one year at Washburn Rural Middle School. He recently earned endorsement to serve in a district level position. His duties as superintendent begin on July 1, 2019.

Marcotte and his wife, Erin, have three children, Brayden, eighth grade, Reanna, sixth grade, and James, fifth grade. In his free time, he enjoys spending time with his family, and gardening.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas