070115-July-4

Celebrate Fourth of July the old-fashioned way at Lyndon

Who doesn’t like to celebrate Independence Day the good old-fashioned way? And where better to celebrate Fourth of July than the middle of Osage County – right here in Lyndon, the county More »

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Eat Well to Be Well: Fast food and eating healthy? It’s possible with a little help

Fast food and eating healthy – seems like such a dichotomy doesn’t it? Yet when you realize that every day, 1 in 4 Americans eats at a fast food restaurant and that More »

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Sunflower Days fair names cutest babies of Osage County

Cutest babies, infant to six months, from left, Lincoln Kraft, first; Tracer Wallace, second, and Rowen Montgomery, third. The Melvern Sunflower Days fair board has announced the cutest babies in Osage County More »

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Microburst hits Overbrook overnight

The National Weather Service in Topeka has reported that Overbrook was one of the hardest hit areas during Thursday night’s storms that continued into the early morning of June 26, and produced More »

Electronic filing in appellate courts to be mandatory effective Nov. 2

TOPEKA—The Kansas Supreme Court announced today that it has a project underway to expand attorneys’ use of electronic filing in the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals with the intent that it will become mandatory effective Nov. 2, 2015.

“This is an important step toward more modern courts that allow attorneys to electronically file their documents from anywhere, saving them both time and money,” said Lawton R. Nuss, chief justice of the Kansas Supreme Court. “In our experience, many attorneys who bring cases to the appellate courts are open to using electronic filing, especially when they discover how easy it is.”

Since April, the clerk of the appellate court’s office has encouraged more attorneys in certain judicial districts to file new criminal cases electronically, focusing on cases with the Office of the Appellate Defender and county and district attorneys. Private attorneys in those judicial districts are also encouraged to file electronically in criminal cases that do not require paying a fee.

Celebrate Fourth of July the old-fashioned way at Lyndon

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Who doesn’t like to celebrate Independence Day the good old-fashioned way? And where better to celebrate Fourth of July than the middle of Osage County – right here in Lyndon, the county seat.

The Lyndon community is inviting all to spend the day in town celebrating their freedom on July 4, or to come for the free fireworks display that evening.

The day of celebration begins at 7 a.m. with a pancake feed at the Lyndon Community Center, sponsored by the Lyndon Lions Club.

After everyone gets filled up at breakfast, the Firecracker 5K starts at 7:30 a.m., beginning at the community center. The 5K run or walk is open to all skill levels, with proceeds benefitting the Lyndon High School cross country team and Lyndon Pride.

At 10:30 a.m. the annual patriotic parade begins, with awards given for best musical act or band, best overall float or group, best walking entry, best business entry, best equestrian entry, best bicycle or wagon entry, best antique or classic car, best tractor, best police or fire vehicle, and mayor’s choice-most spirited.

Anyone who wants to be in the parade should gather at the Lyndon High School parking lot at 9:45 a.m. To register, contact Lyndon City Hall at 785-828-3146. The intersection of Sixth Street and Topeka Avenue is suggested as the best viewing spot for the parade.

Starting at 11:30 a.m. will be the old-fashioned picnic in City Park. Free watermelon will be available while it lasts, and the Masons will be selling picnic lunches 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. From 11:45 a.m. to 2 p.m. will be games for all ages, such as nail driving and more, along with prizes.

Horseback, bicycle or on foot: Benefit triathlon teams to race on Flint Hills Nature Trail

Plan now to ride, bike or run along the beautiful Flint Hills Nature Trail in Osage County in a unique three-person-team run, and also help promote and protect access to public lands in Kansas.

Proceeds of the Tri-Trail Benefit 5K race, to be held July 25, 2015, will benefit the Kansas Chapter of Back Country Horsemen of America, an organization dedicated to keeping America’s trails open.

Each team is composed of a runner, biker and trail rider. At registration, participants will estimate their time on a leg of the race (run, bike, ride). The team finishing closest to the estimated time of all three participants will be the winner.

The race begins at 8:30 a.m. July 25 at Salt Creek Ranch, 4215 E. 245th St., Lyndon.

Camping, lodging and corrals are available for early arrivals; contact Carol at 785-215-2296 for pricing and reservations. Entry fee for the race is $35 per person; registration is available online at www.yourequineadventure.com.

Lunch and dinner trips scheduled to visit Topeka eateries

The signup sheets for our two July rider appreciation trips are out. On Saturday, July 18, we will have lunch at Cook’s American Grill, followed by a drive around some interesting areas of Topeka. The evening of July 23 our bus will head for Topeka again for a supper meal at Jose Peppers Mexican Restaurant. Call or stop by the center to get your name on the list. Each trip will be limited to the first 14 riders to sign up.

Filings in Osage County Courthouse June 22 – June 26, 2015

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse June 22 through June 26, 2015.

Eat Well to Be Well: Fast food and eating healthy? It’s possible with a little help

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Fast food and eating healthy – seems like such a dichotomy doesn’t it? Yet when you realize that every day, 1 in 4 Americans eats at a fast food restaurant and that French fries are the most eaten vegetable in this nation, we need help. Help as in making better, healthier food choices at these restaurants. It’d be nice if we all cut back on our consumption of fast food but reality tends to dictate. Reality being that fast food is still relatively cheap, satisfying and, well, fast – exactly what many people are looking for.

“Fast food is woven into the social fabric of America,” said Dr. David Samadi, chairman of urology and chief of robotic surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City. “We’re living in a country where the economy of food plays a huge role.”

Only one problem though. A recent Gallup-Healthways Well-being Index showed that the percentage of U.S. adults who are obese rose to 27.7 percent in 2014, which is a disappointing upward trend considering that in 2013 the obesity rate was 27.1 percent and in 2008 it was 25.5 percent. The age group where obesity increased the most was among Americans aged 65 and older. Interestingly, the percentage of Americans who are underweight has remained steady at 2.0 percent.

Osage County Jail Log, June 21 – June 27, 2015

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Food for Thought: Family picnics are fun with aunts

By Nancy Schuster, Frontier District Extension Agent

Did I catch your attention with picnics and aunts? Childhood memories of the time my cousins and I gave Aunt Alma a chair covered in ants to sit on for a picnic comes to mind. Obviously Aunt Alma wasn’t too pleased. I am sure we all were scolded.

foodforthoughtFood safety is something no one wants to talk about. We don’t want to read about food safety either. It’s boring! When food is improperly handled food borne illness can range from flu like symptoms to death. Occasionally, reviewing a few food safety facts is important for everyone.

Taking perishable foods from home requires keeping the food cold to slow down bacteria growth. Use an insulated cooler with enough ice or ice packs to keep the food at 40 degrees F or below. Save packing the food as the last job you do before leaving the house, directly from the refrigerator.

2015 Osage County Fair livestock show results

The Osage County Fair Association has announced the following ribbon winners in the livestock exhibitions at the Osage County Fair held June 24-27, 2015, at Osage City:

Sunflower Days fair names cutest babies of Osage County

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Cutest babies, infant to six months, from left, Lincoln Kraft, first; Tracer Wallace, second, and Rowen Montgomery, third.

The Melvern Sunflower Days fair board has announced the cutest babies in Osage County for 2015, determined at annual baby show held June 25, 2015, during Sunflower Days 4-H Fair.

In the infant to six months category, the first place winner was Lincoln Kraft, son of Doug and Hanna Kraft, of North Carolina; second place was Tracer Wallace, son of Paige and Dale Wallace, Melvern; and third place was Rowen Montgomery, son of Derek and Samantha Montgomery, Lebo.

In the seven months to one year category, William Lichtenauer, son of Megan and Jake Lichtenauer, Melvern, won first place; Gunner Arb, son of Destiny James and Tyler Arb, Melvern, was second; and Addilyn  McCurdy, daughter of Tom McCurdy and Jessica Green, Melvern, was the third-place cutie.

Outdoors: Fishing reports for Melvern Lake, Pomona Lake and Osage County Fishing Lake

The following fishing and lake reports for Osage County lakes were provided by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism.

Mah discusses key points of judges’ school funding order

By Ann Mah

The three-judge panel issued an order Friday regarding the constitutionality of the block grant school funding law (SB7) the Legislature passed this year. A hearing was held in May on that issue. Friday the panel ruled that SB7 was unconstitutional on both equity and adequacy.

Equity is about funding fairness (i.e., does it work for all districts, whether rich or poor).  Adequacy means does it provide enough money to fund the kind of education we have decided we want. Last year the courts first ruled on the equity portion and said it was inequitable. The Legislature had to put $129 million more into school funding. With the block grants the Legislature cut about $51 million of that $129 million before the school year was over, so it’s no real surprise the courts were not happy on that account.

So what happens now? AG Schmidt has asked for a stay of the order until it works its way through the system. I would expect the courts to rule on that ASAP. Depending on how this goes, we might have to have a special session yet either right away or sometime this summer to figure out the additional funding.

Here are some of the key points:

Wanda Lu Burge, 54, Burlingame: Sept. 28, 1960 – June 27, 2015

BURLINGAME – Wanda Lu Burge, 54, passed away on Saturday, June 27, 2015, at her home in Burlingame. She was born on Sept. 28, 1960, in Grand Junction, Colo., the daughter of Roy and Margie Ditzfield Rogers.

Wanda had lived in Harveyville before moving to Burlingame 10 years ago.

She had worked as a C.M.A. for COF and had managed Granny’s Used Books, in Burlingame and Topeka. She was a member of the Boozettes No. 49. She enjoyed riding motorcycles, camping and RVing.

Teen falls asleep, rolls vehicle on U.S. 75

06262015--us75-wreckA Salina woman was injured in a single-car accident Friday on U.S. Highway 75, just south of the Osage and Shawnee county line.

According the Kansas Highway Patrol, Anna Kay Zuercher, 19, Salina, was driving a 2006 Buick Rendezvous southbound on U.S. 75 at 6:05 p.m. June 26, 2015, when she fell asleep, left the roadway, overcorrected and rolled the vehicle.

Zuercher was injured in the accident and transported to Stormont Vail, in Topeka. KHP reported she was wearing a seatbelt when the accident occurred.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Power of horses hereafter

buchmanhead“So many of our friends and heroes have gone away.”

In two weeks, we’ve been saddened by passing of three longtime acquaintances with admirable reflections of each at their memorials.

As we sat next to a cowboy-veterinarian friend at the rodeo, we talked about cowboys we’ve mutually known and admired.

Mention was made that we’d not seen him at one service, and tactlessly asked: “You don’t like funerals?” Immediately, we apologized for the inappropriate remark, as he solemnly shook his head.

Nobody wants to attend such rites, truly, but we do out of honor and sake of the living. Each is different in respect, remembering another in a personal way.

Arvonia society challenges Osage County to help revive church’s tin ceiling

051915-arvoniaArvonia Historic Preservation Society’s Tin Ceiling Revival campaign is coming to a close, and the society is challenging Osage Countians to donate to this effort to restore the tin ceiling in the church at the former town site of Arvonia.

With work steadily progressing on the Arvonia school and church, the AHPS began the campaign to restore the tin ceiling, which was in disrepair with some of the tin hanging down. Most of the ceiling will be able to be used, but some will need replaced. The goal is to “revive” 1148 tiles.

To become a part of the  tin ceiling restoration project or learn more, see www.kanstarter.com.

For more information about Arvonia, AHPS or the restoration of the buildings, see related story here, or contact Susan Evans Atchison at arvoniaks@gmail.com.

Black bear sighted in Cherokee County

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PRATT – The report of a black bear sighting in Cherokee County last weekend was verified by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism biologists with photographs and tracks. A black bear was videoed on Saturday, June 20, and photographed on Sunday, June 21, in locations about 16 miles apart. Tracks in soft soil were also identified.

According to KDWPT furbearer biologist Matt Peek, it is uncertain whether this was one or two separate bears, but both the video and photos appeared to show a young animal.

“It’s common for yearling black bears to disperse into new areas seeking their own home range,” Peek said. “Missouri biologists have reported seeing a lot of this lately.”

These transient bears probably account for the handful of black bear reports in Kansas in recent years. Most reports occur in far southwest Kansas, where multiple dispersal-aged bears have been documented since 2000.

Microburst hits Overbrook overnight

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The National Weather Service in Topeka has reported that Overbrook was one of the hardest hit areas during Thursday night’s storms that continued into the early morning of June 26, and produced damaging winds across eastern Kansas.

Winds between 50 mph and 70 mph were reported throughout the area, with some localized areas seeing winds in excess of 70 mph.

Overbrook was hit with damaging winds overnight and downed trees and power lines were reported. A NWS survey team was sent to the area Friday morning after the storms, and confirmed the town was hit with straight line winds between 60-80 mph associated with a microburst.

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