Dangerous heat forecast Wednesday through Saturday

The National Weather Service in Topeka has issued an excessive heat warning is in effect for the entire outlook area today, Wednesday, July 17, 2019, through Saturday. Heat indices More »

911: Emergency call services back in working order in Osage County

A social media post by the Osage County Sheriff’s Office announced that 911 emergency call services in the county are again in working order as of 2:05 a.m. today, More »

Mosquitoes interrupt summer: KDHE recommends bite prevention

TOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment recommends Kansans take preventive measures against mosquito bites, as floods throughout the state have caused an increase in mosquito More »

Eat Well to Be Well: Why choosing cow’s milk still matters

Going to the grocery store to “get milk,” is not always what it used to mean. Open up the refrigerator in many homes, and the “milk” might instead be More »

Help Wanted: Three Lakes seeks Paraeducators for upcoming school year

Three Lakes Educational Cooperative is taking applications for the 2019-2020 school year for full-time paraeducators for all six school districts in Osage and West Franklin counties: West Franklin, Osage City, Lyndon, Santa Fe Trail, Burlingame, and Marais des Cygnes Valley. Applications are available online at www.three-lakes.org/employment.

Texas woman dies in I-35 crash in Osage County early Monday

BETO JUNCTION, Kan. – A Texas woman was killed in a single car accident early Monday morning near Beto Junction on northbound Interstate 35. That accident was followed a few hours later by a semi-truck hitting a Kansas Department of Transportation warning vehicle about a mile away.

A report by the Kansas Highway Patrol said that Patricia M. Falconer, 52, of Canyon Lake, Texas, died in the accident that occurred around 5:30 a.m. Monday, July 15, 2019, about 2.5 miles from the I-35 and U.S. Highway 75 interchange, in Osage County, Kan., known locally as Beto Junction.

The report said Falconer was driving a 1999 Ford Explorer northbound on I-35 near mile marker 158, with a passenger, Jeffrey Tyler Cadman, 27, Canyon Lake, Texas. For an unknown reason, the vehicle left the roadway and entered the center grassy median. The vehicle turned back onto the roadway and crossed both lanes of northbound travel, entering the south ditch. The driver over-corrected and the Explorer rolled several times, coming to rest facing northwest on its wheels in the south ditch of the northbound lanes.

Cadman was listed as having suspected serious injuries and was transported to Overland Park Regional Hospital, Overland Park, Kan. Both Falconer and Cadman were wearing seatbelts at the time of the crash.

About two hours after the fatality accident, at 7:55 a.m., a Kansas Department of Transportation vehicle was involved in a collision with a semi-truck in the vicinity of the earlier crash. A KHP report on that accident said the KDOT truck with a sign board trailer was legally parked on I-35 in the northbound lane about 1.5 miles east of the I-35 and U.S.75 interchange, when a northbound 2019 International truck, driven by Morris J. Guesby, 55, Lawrence, Kan., struck the stopped KDOT truck, a 2009 Sterling.

The driver of the KDOT truck, Christopher A. Staley, 48, Williamsburg, Kan., was transported to Coffey County Hospital, Burlington, Kan., with suspected minor injuries. Guesby was reported as possibly injured and complained of pain, but he was not transported to a hospital. Both drivers were wearing proper safety restraints at the time of the accident.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, July 1 – July 5, 2019

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse July 1 through July 5, 2019.

Osage County Jail Log, July 7 – July 13, 2019

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Dangerous heat forecast Wednesday through Saturday

The National Weather Service in Topeka has issued an excessive heat warning is in effect for the entire outlook area today, Wednesday, July 17, 2019, through Saturday. Heat indices of 103 to 112 degrees is expected each afternoon.

Isolated thunderstorms are possible today and are not expected to become severe. There continues to be a slight chance of storms in north central Kansas this evening.

Today through Saturday, NWS forecasts dangerously hot temperatures, with highs in the mid 90s to around 103 degrees, and heat index values approaching around 110 degrees.

All of the NWS Topeka coverage area will be impacted by 103 to 112 degree heat indices each afternoon through Saturday.

When under an excessive heat warning, Ready.gov advises people should:

  • Stay inside in air conditioning.
  • Avoid strenuous activities outdoors.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Never leave a child, adult, or animal alone inside a vehicle on a warm day.
  • Find places with air conditioning if you don’t have it in your home. Libraries, shopping malls, and community centers can provide a cool place to take a break from the heat.
  • If you’re outside, find shade. Wear a hat wide enough to protect your face.
  • Drink plenty of fluids to stay hydrated.

Heat related illnesses are more likely when heat index values exceed 100 degrees. Check yourself, family members, and neighbors for signs of heat-related illness. Watch for heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke.

Help Wanted: Three Lakes seeks Data Clerk

Data clerk needed for a full time 12 month position at the Three Lakes Educational Cooperative office, Lyndon. Word processing and working knowledge of MS Excel is required. Attention to detail is critical. Paid benefits include BC/BS health insurance, sick/discretionary leave, and vacation. Apply online at www.three-lakes.org/employment. 

911: Emergency call services back in working order in Osage County

A social media post by the Osage County Sheriff’s Office announced that 911 emergency call services in the county are again in working order as of 2:05 a.m. today, July 16, 2019.

The sheriff’s office reported on social media about 6:30 p.m. yesterday that 911 and long distance calls for Osage County were not working. The post said the sheriff’s office could only connect on calls to and from Lyndon numbers at the time, and reported that Centurylink, a local phone service provider, was working on the problem.

In that post, the sheriff’s office advised that anyone with an emergency or who needed to reach dispatch should call 785-224-1212 or 785-817-1659, and said those numbers were only active during the times the phone problem was occurring. The sheriff’s office asked its Facebook followers to pass on information about the emergency call services outage to family and friends who did not use the social media platform.

This afternoon, Osage County Sheriff Laurie Dunn said she still did not know the reason for the outage of the county’s 911 system. She confirmed that such outages are a danger to the public and noted they have happened before with the current phone system, sometimes caused by cut phone lines.

“Normally it’s the regular phone lines, but not this time,” Dunn said in a text message today.

Dunn said she was told the outage affected several counties.

“I hope for answers tomorrow,” Dunn said, noting she was to receive an update on the problem from Centurylink on Wednesday.

Public drinking water notice rescinded for Carbondale

TOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has rescinded a public drinking water notice for the city of Carbondale, Kan. The notice was issued because of low levels of microcystin, a blue-green algae toxin being detected in the drinking water. While the levels and water remained acceptable for drinking, food preparation and household uses, the EPA and KDHE believed it was important to inform consumers.

Samples collected by the city of Carbondale have indicated microcystin levels below laboratory detection levels for drinking water since July 1, 2019. The city’s drinking water has remained below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 10-day health advisory levels of 0.3 micrograms per liter and was acceptable for drinking, food preparation and all household use for the entire public notice period.

Microcystins entered the supply due to blue-green algae blooms occurring in Strowbridge Reservoir, the source water for Carbondale’s water supply. The Carbondale Public Water Supply has joined the KDHE Public Water Supply Harmful Algal Bloom Voluntary Monitoring Program and will continue to treat and monitor the public water supply for microcystins through October 2019.

Water systems purchasing water from Carbondale, including the city of Scranton and Osage County Rural Water District No. 5, should be aware of the rescinded notice and be assured the water is acceptable for use.

For more information, contact your local water supplier or KDHE Public Water Supply Section at 785-296-5514.

Help Wanted: ORBIS seeks Night Shift Press Operators

ORBIS Corporation has implemented new Press Operator pay of $14.00 per hour, and is currently looking for night operators.

ORBIS Corporation is the industry leader in returnable packaging with a plant located in the Osage City, Kan. ORBIS is a worldwide company offering competitive pay and benefits.

For more information or to apply, contact ORBIS at 515 S. Fourth St., Osage City, Kan., call 785-528-4875, or visit www.orbiscorporation.com.

Yeehaw! It’s almost time for vacation Bible school at Melvern

Students will “cowboy up” for Melvern United Methodist Church’s Vacation Bible School this summer. With a loud “Yeehaw!” the school will be held 5-8 p.m. Aug. 2 and 3, 2019, at the church.

UMC’s VBS is open to students in kindergarten through sixth grade. Dinner for students will be included each evening.

For more information or to register, contact Audrey Cop at 913-215-0107. Melvern United Methodist Church is at 620 N.W. Emporia St., Melvern.

A Cowboy’s Faith: A time for everything

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“It never was that way before.”

The comment rang appropriate truth not just subject at hand but seemingly everything nowadays.

Conversation related to several dump truckloads of creek gravel in a big yard pile for spreading on the driveway.

Ruts and potholes in the barnyard entrance needed filled and smoothed again. Be interesting to know how many times that’s been done in a half century, nearly 48 years home place.

Simpler than days gone by as the ranch manager son is talented operating tractor with frontend loader leveling the roadway.

What brought the subject up was cleaning old hay out of the pole storage barn, coupled with downpours.

The barn held standing water with big ruts in front. Even deeper water bogged furrows in the lean-to where the square baler is stored. Gravel will make a base again.

Winter cow lots don’t have a bottom without gravel for solidity. However, those bovine, their calves, sometimes other cattle and horses year around leave droppings accumulating to necessitate regular cleanup.

With loader tractor and manure spreader, wastes go on nearby brome field. That again leaves low spots in the corrals and accompanying pens which must also be filled with gravel and smoothed out.

Never before, at least in lifetimes, have some seen so much rain causing such havoc in so many directions. Likewise, when Mother Nature wields additional detrimental acts hopefully one has not experienced and never does again.

Help House News: Volunteers bring success to spring benefit sale

By Raylene Quaney

Help House’s benefit garage sale June 14 and 15, 2019, was a success thanks to more than 30 volunteers under the planning and organization of Lois Shuck. Help House would like to thank the Osage City Fair Board for renting us their big tent once again. With the rain and wind Friday morning, it would not have been possible to hold the sale without it, we’re so grateful for shelter from the storm.

Mobile food pantries

Mobile food pantry dates: Melvern mobile pantry, 12:30 p.m. on the third Thursday, July 18, at the Melvern Community Center; Burlingame, 10 a.m. third Thursday, July 18, at Burlingame Federated Church; Lyndon, 12 p.m. third Friday, July 19, at Jones Park on East Sixth Street. Those participating in the mobile pantry are asked to be in line 15 to 20 minutes before starting time to be counted to determine how much of each item each family will receive. Osage City will not have a mobile pantry this month.

Help House assists with SNAP application

Help House volunteers are available to provide assistance for those who apply for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Applicants need proof of identification, social security information for each member of the household, income verification each member of the household (a most recent bank statement will be copied and sent in with application), also required, any owned vehicle information, and if 60 or older or disabled, any medical expenses including health insurance and Medicare premiums and prescription costs or bills due. Please call the office at 785-828-4888 to make an appointment.  Appointments need to be scheduled between 10 a.m. and 12 p.m. Allow at least one hour for the application process.

Summer Fan Club

The Summer Fan Club has been giving out fans to those who have signed up. We still have several families in need, so if you have a used fan in good condition or would like to purchase a fan to be given away, you may drop them off during our regular hours. Please do not leave donated fans in the shed out back. If you would like to make a cash donation for us to purchase the fans for you, checks may be made out to Help House and sent to PO Box 356, Lyndon KS 66451. Make a note in the memo section “Fan Club”.

Mosquitoes interrupt summer: KDHE recommends bite prevention

TOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment recommends Kansans take preventive measures against mosquito bites, as floods throughout the state have caused an increase in mosquito populations. Mosquito surveillance in Reno, Sedgwick and Shawnee counties has shown an increase Culex species mosquitoes which can transmit West Nile virus and other viruses that can affect humans. This species of mosquitoes is most active at dawn and dusk.

“West Nile virus can be spread to people through bites from infected mosquitoes, but it is not contagious from person to person,” said KDHE Secretary Lee Norman MD. “Symptoms range from a slight headache and low-grade fever to swelling of the brain or brain tissue and, in rare cases, death.”

Since 2002 there have been 677 cases and 35 deaths in Kansans from West Nile virus. To date, there have been no cases of West Nile virus reported to KDHE in 2019. People who have had West Nile virus before are considered immune. Cases are most common from mid-July through late September.

KDHE has developed West Nile virus risk levels to help guide prevention efforts for both communities and individuals. These risk level reports will be posted weekly at www.kdheks.gov/epi/arboviral_disease.htm. All six regions of Kansas are currently at moderate risk level.

KDHE recommends the following precautions to protect against West Nile virus:

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, June 24 – June 28, 2019

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, June 24 through June 28, 2019.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, June 17 – June 21, 2019

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, June 17 through June 21, 2019.

Fourth of July week keeps sheriff’s office busy; public help sought in stolen property case

Osage County Sheriff Laurie Dunn released a public report of arrests and criminal activity during the first week of July 2019, and is asking the public’s help in locating two individuals wanted for questioning in one case.

The sheriff reported that at 12:02 p.m. July 2, 2019, sheriff’s officers located a vehicle in Lyndon that had been stolen from Topeka. Dylan Walstrom, 25, Topeka, was arrested and charged with possession of a stolen vehicle.

Later that day, the sheriff’s office conducted a search warrant in the 4500 block of East 309th Street, near Melvern. Located at the residence were two stolen vehicles, one from Overbrook and one from Pittsburg, Kan. During this search warrant items from recent car burglaries in Melvern and Overbrook were located, along with items from burglaries in Franklin, Douglas, Crawford and other counties. The investigation is still ongoing.

Angela Bogue, 41, of the residence about two miles east of Melvern, was arrested for possession of a stimulant and drug paraphernalia, and obstruction.

The sheriff’s office is seeking to question Anthony Perry and Jessica Orton regarding the case. Anyone who knows of their whereabouts is asked to contact the Osage County Sheriff’s Office at 785-828-3121 or Crimestoppers at 1-877-OSCRIME.

The sheriff also reported that at 8:05 a.m. July 3, 2019, officers conducted a search warrant at 4473 E. 229th St., Vassar, recovering 145 marijuana plants and other drug related items. James Borders Jr., 60, was arrested in connection with numerous charges and transported to the Osage County Jail.

The sheriff’s office also arrested a man after negotiating with him to come out of his barricaded home south of Overbrook last week. Dunn reported that around 12:20 a.m. July 5, 2019, officers attempted to arrest Bradley Mitchell 28, at his residence located at 4063 E. 189th St., about five miles southwest of Overbrook. The sheriff said Mitchell had barricaded himself inside his mobile home. After negotiations with the sheriff’s office and Kansas Bureau of Investigation, Mitchell was arrested at approximately 4 a.m. without incident.

Mitchell was wanted on warrants from Osage, Douglas and Franklin counties, and the Kansas Department of Corrections.

Osage County Jail Log, June 31 – July 5, 2019

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Osage County Jail Log, June 23 – June 28, 2019

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Eat Well to Be Well: Why choosing cow’s milk still matters

Going to the grocery store to “get milk,” is not always what it used to mean. Open up the refrigerator in many homes, and the “milk” might instead be a nondairy milk alternative. From soymilk, almond, coconut, rice, cashew, oat, hemp, quinoa, or hazelnut, just to name a few, cow’s milk has competition.

Traditional cow’s milk still dominates the milk market, but research shows that U.S. nondairy milk sales are growing, causing cow’s milk sales to sag. Nondairy milk alternatives have gained popularity among consumers. But are nondairy milk alternatives as healthy for us as cow’s milk and why are consumers dropping dairy milk for plant-based alternative milks anyway?

Reasons for the switch to nondairy milk alternatives

The consumer consumption switch on buying more nondairy milk alternatives is being fueled for several reasons:

  • People with a milk allergy have a safe alternative to cow’s milk.
  • People with lactose intolerance – however, dairy milk manufacturers make some varieties of cow’s milk with the lactose already broken down.
  • People who are vegans and consume no animal products.
  • People who have health concerns over consuming dairy milk believing it is fattening or unhealthy.
  • There is public perception that nondairy milk alternatives are healthier than dairy milk.
  • Some consumers question modern milk production practices.

How does the nutritional profile of cow’s milk compare to plant-based milks? This is where it is very important for consumer’s to read the nutrition facts label on all types of nondairy milk alternatives. While it’s tempting to follow the trend of drinking plant-based milk alternatives, before deserting cow’s milk, know the nutritional differences between them.

Let’s be clear, cow’s milk is still the gold standard with a high nutritional profile for several reasons:

Local ag leaders to represent Osage City community

Longtime Osage County residents Fred and Pat Pearson have been selected by the Osage City Chamber of Commerce as Mr. and Mrs. Osage City for 2019.

Fred was born and raised on a farm near Miller, Kan. He attended Kansas State University 1959 to 1963, and studied agricultural education. He met Pat during college. Pat grew up on a farm near Manhattan, Kan.

“My father wanted someone in the family to farm and he was pleased to find out that Fred and I planned to marry,” Pat said.

Fred and Pat were married in 1963. From 1963 to 1968, Fred taught vocational agriculture at Burlingame and Pat taught grade school at Osage City. Pat retired from teaching to take care of her grandchildren and help as needed around the farm.

The first ground Fred and Pat bought was in 1966. Also that year, Fred and his father, Earl, started the Miller Elevator. The young couple purchased 240 acres and moved to their current home in 1969.

Fred and Pat’s family includes son, Clark, his wife, Bobbi, and their son, Max; son, Jim, his wife, Dawn, and their children, Paige and Peyton; and son, Jeff. The Pearson family has farmed in the Osage City area for more than 145 years.

Fred and Pat said they felt very honored and appreciative for being selected and offered these words:

“We have had the honor, privilege and opportunity to live and work in the Osage City Community for over 51 years. This community has many advantages that we feel are intensely important to enjoying a pleasant life style.

“The excellent school system that is stable, progressive and effective was our greatest priority.

“The character of the people in this community has always contributed to a neat, clean and progressive community. Osage City has a history of many fine churches, clubs and organizations that enhance great citizenship.

“A good solid business community is very important to the well-being of any area and Osage City has been outstanding in this concept. We have been richly blessed by the opportunities in the cattle business, farming and the grain elevator business. We are confident that we could not have found a better community in which to live, work and enjoy life.”

The Pearsons will be honored guests and ride in the annual Osage County Fair Parade, which will begin at 6:30 p.m. Friday, July 12, 2019, along Market Street in Osage City, Kan.

Gundy to marshal Osage County Fair Parade Friday evening

The Osage City Chamber of Commerce has announced that Pat Gundy will be the 2019 Osage County Fair parade marshal.

Gundy was born a native of Emporia, Kan., to Cash and Edna Lowry, the ninth of 11 children.  She graduated from Emporia High School in 1951.  She worked and retired from Southwestern Bell after 30 years, Lyon County Courthouse for 15 years, and Osage City preschool for 17 years.

In 1955, she married Richard Gundy, and they moved to Reading, Kan., in 1962.  She lived on the farm for 31 years, moved back to Emporia for a short stint before calling Osage City home for the last 23 years.

Gundy’s daughter is Tricia Gundy. Pat has three grandchildren, Dalton, Kaitlin, and Carter, and a great grandchild, Axel. She enjoys gardening, sewing, quilting, and being around her family.  Pat is a member of the Reading United Methodist, Marshall Club, and the Mary Elizabeth Circle of the Osage City United Methodist Church.  She also serves on the Osage City Friends of the Library board.

Gundy will marshal the annual Osage County Fair Parade, which will begin at 6:30 p.m. Friday, July 12, 2019, along Market Street in Osage City, Kan. The parade’s theme is “Fresh from the Farm.”

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas