Spring delivers beautiful day for a hunt

By Bella Reeser Melvern Jr. Highline 4-H Club Warm sunshine, a gentle cool breeze – what better conditions could you ask for? Especially, if you are hosting an Easter More »

Drug Take-Back Day: Turn-in unused medications Saturday at Lyndon, Overbrook

LYNDON, Kan. – Local law enforcement officers will join others across the state in collecting unused medications for safe disposal 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, April 27, 2019. The collection More »

MdCV FFA hosts family and friends for annual chapter banquet

MdCV officers, new and retiring, front from left, Chloe Volkman, Alaina Marsh, State FFA Sentinel Garrett Craig, Kaelin Criqui, Kathryn Vaught, back, Danny Rice, MdCV FFA advisor, Bayleigh Lacey, Sadie More »

How would you like that cooked? Auto show well done in downtown Osage City

Vintage and classic cars lined Market Street April 13, 2019, as the Cruis’n and Cook’n Auto Show cooked up a good time in downtown Osage City. Photo by Sam More »

Coffey County jury finds woman guilty of mistreatment, murder of husband

BURLINGTON, Kan. – A Coffey County jury today found Carol Sue Burris, 69, of New Strawn, Kan., guilty of one count of reckless second degree murder and one count of mistreatment of an elder person, the Kansas Attorney General’s Office reported in a press release.

The charges stemmed from the mistreatment and death of Burris’ husband, Michael D. Burris, in New Strawn from April 2016 to October 2017.

Chief Judge Taylor J. Wine presided over the trial, which began April 22. Sentencing is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. June 27, 2019, in Coffey County District Court.

Deputy Attorney General Steve Karrer and Coffey County Attorney Wade H. Bowie II are prosecuting the case. The case was investigated by the Coffey County Sheriff’s Office.

Eat Well to be Well: Build brainpower with brain-healthy foods

“To keep the body in good health is a duty, otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear.” This very wise and aptly spoken quote from Buddha makes perfect sense in the world today when a greater percentage of our population is developing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

We always hear talk about heart health but what about brain health? Our brain needs our attention too. It needs to be nourished and fed the right kind of foods to keep us thinking clearly, focused, feeling energetic and functioning at our best.

As dementia and Alzheimer’s disease continue to rise in the United States with no cure in sight, the earlier we begin making healthy food choices, the better. Currently, Alzheimer’s disease is the 6th leading cause of death with 5.3 million Americans living with this condition. It is predicted that unless a cure is found, 16 million Americans will have the disease by 2050.

The brain needs adequate blood flow to enhance memory and cognitive thinking. Many studies have been conducted demonstrating how a healthy diet with proper food choices does indeed make a remarkable difference in how we think and feel, giving us a brain boost we can benefit from. By adding in foods to boost brain health, this is one way we can participate in keeping our brains healthy. Here are five foods for protecting, promoting and preserving brain health:

Spring delivers beautiful day for a hunt

By Bella Reeser
Melvern Jr. Highline 4-H Club

Warm sunshine, a gentle cool breeze – what better conditions could you ask for? Especially, if you are hosting an Easter egg hunt! These were the perfect conditions the Melvern Jr. Highline 4-H Club was blessed with on April 20, 2019, when they hosted the annual Melvern Easter Egg Hunt. More than one hundred egg hunters and their families came out to enjoy the beautiful weather and fellowship of their local townsmen.  

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, April 8 – April 12, 2019

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, April 8 through April 12, 2019.

Wanda Lucille Hanks, 81, Emporia: April 25, 1937 – April 21, 2019

EMPORIA, Kan. – Wanda Lucille (Raney) Hanks, 81, passed away Sunday, April 21, 2019, at Presbyterian Manor, Emporia, Kan. Wanda was born April 25, 1937, in Tulare, Calif., the daughter of Alva Robert and Jewell Louetta Ann (Hays) Raney. She moved to Norwood, Mo., at the age of 7 and attended school there.

Hellen E. Starkebaum, 92, Carbondale: Nov. 11, 1926 – April 18, 2019

CARBONDALE, Kan. – Hellen E. Starkebaum, 92, of Carbondale, Kan., passed away April 18, 2019, at her home. She was born Nov. 11, 1926, in Dover, Okla., one of nine children of Charles Tucker Beckmon and Anna Marie Chriestenson Beckmon.

She grew up in Kingfisher County, Okla., before moving to Kansas with her family as a teenager. 

Osage County Jail Log, April 15 – April 20, 2019

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Drug Take-Back Day: Turn-in unused medications Saturday at Lyndon, Overbrook

LYNDON, Kan. – Local law enforcement officers will join others across the state in collecting unused medications for safe disposal 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, April 27, 2019. The collection events are part of a nationwide effort to safely dispose of leftover medications to prevent accidental or intentional misuse.

In Osage County, the Osage County Sheriff’s Office, 131 W. 14th St., Lyndon, and Overbrook Police Department, 102 W. Santa Fe Trail, Overbrook, will be collection points for the national Drug Take-Back Day.

Since the Drug Take-Back Day program began in 2010, more than 81 tons of unwanted medications have been collected and destroyed in Kansas.

“Unused medications are dangerous for kids, pets and the environment,” Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt said. “Diversion of opioid painkillers, in particular, can contribute to the misuse of these drugs that has become a serious nationwide problem. Getting leftover medicines out of the medicine cabinets and safely destroyed keeps them from falling into the wrong hands and makes our communities safer.”

The National Drug Take-Back Day is coordinated by the federal Drug Enforcement Administration, which collects and safely destroys the medications.

Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse and abuse. Nationwide, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates opioid overdoses kill 130 Americans every day. According to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, pharmaceutical opioids are a leading cause of drug poisoning deaths in Kansas.

Studies show a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that traditional methods for disposing of unused medicines – flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash – pose potential safety and health hazards and should be avoided.

Unused prescriptions can be turned in year-round at many local law enforcement locations. For more information about local collections of unused medications, contact the Osage County Sheriff’s Office at 785-828-3121.

Help wanted? Osage County News can help you

Osage County News can help you with “help wanted”. We reach thousands of people in the local area weekly, and hopefully can help you find the perfect candidate for your job.

Here is a comment we recently received about the results of one of our customer’s help wanted ads:

“We have had a very good response and have been happy with the quality of applicants the ad has brought to us.”

Our rates are affordable, and all ads come with unmatched friendly, efficient service. Contact us today to find out how you can connect to the Osage County area online community and let prospective employees know about your job openings. Call 785-828-4994 or email [email protected].

A Cowboy’s Faith: Exceeding speed always hazardous

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Driving too fast is dangerous to all concerned.”

Preface conversation with legitimacy of thoughts having received too many “traffic citations.” Friend mentor decades ago, Warren Gilman, Chamber of Commerce leader, got “tickets” on occasion. Each one just shrugged off: “They’re manmade laws and can change upon a wisp.”

Certainly, that’s true with frequency that speed limits have gone up and down. Likewise, varying stringency, leniency, inconsistency of enforcement, such enforcers often exceed posted signs.

Still, no question, wrecks increase with heavy footed automotive driving.

Interesting though speeding on roadways was considered dangerous resulting in fines long before cars were invented.

If President Grant were alive today, he’d probably have quite a few points on his license by now.

While Grant was president in 1866, accidents forced Washington, D.C., authorities to crack down on speeders. For policeman William West, the last straw was when a woman and six-year-old child were seriously injured on West’s corner by a “driver of fast horses.”

The next day, West caught Grant’s buggy going at “a furious pace.” America’s top elected official was immediately pulled over.

“Mister President,” said West, “I want to tell you that you were violating the law by driving at reckless speed. It is endangering the lives of the people who have to cross the street.”

Eastern Kansas grazing school to be held in Ottawa

Rotation grazing is recognized as a way to utilize pastures and forages more efficiently. A collaboration of experts from K-State Research and Extension, Natural Resource Conservation Service and the University of Missouri are joining together to offer a two-day grazing school to present information about grazing in the classroom and in nearby pastures.

This year’s event marks the 8th annual grazing school and will be held April 24 and 25, 2019, at the Franklin County Fairgrounds, Celebration Hall, 220 W. 17th St., Ottawa, Kan. The event will feature special presenters, Mark Green, Missouri NRCS, and Wesley Tucker, University of Missouri Extension Service, who will be sharing their expertise. Green will discuss fencing options and water systems and development. Tucker will present the economics of grazing and will help producers with layout and design of grazing paddocks.

MdCV FFA hosts family and friends for annual chapter banquet

MdCV officers, new and retiring, front from left, Chloe Volkman, Alaina Marsh, State FFA Sentinel Garrett Craig, Kaelin Criqui, Kathryn Vaught, back, Danny Rice, MdCV FFA advisor, Bayleigh Lacey, Sadie McGowin, Koby Vanderpool, Wyatt Lingenfelter, and Frank Warner. MdCV FFA photo.

The annual Marias des Cygnes Valley FFA Chapter Banquet was held on Friday April 11, 2019. Approximately 100 people, including members, families, and friends, gathered in the Melvern Community Center for pork chops and a potluck meal, awards and the installation of the 2019-2020 chapter officers.

An invocation from Frank Warner was followed by the dinner consisting of pork chops, sponsored by Don and Janise Hook, and side dishes and desserts brought by our members and their families. Following the dinner and chapter scrapbook video produced by Kathryn Vaught, the chapter officers president Chloe Volkman, vice-president Brookelyn Janssen, secretary Kathryn Vaught, treasurer Bayleigh Lacey, reporter Frank Warner, sentinel Alaina Marsh, and advisor and KSU student intern Cassandra Ebert began with opening ceremonies. KobyVanderpool, chapter student-council representative, introduced special guest speaker Garrett Craig, Kansas FFA Sentinel, with his speech “Focusing and Committing to Your Talents and Passion”.

Other guests included members of the USD 456 Board of Education, Marais des Cygnes Valley High School Principal Ben Gordon, members of the MdCV Ag Education Advisory Board, Joe and Shirley Litchtenauer, Dale and Peggy McCurdy, Jeff and Merrilyn Casten, Jennifer and Peter Roy, Janae and Caleb McNally, Jarah and Mike Hauger, and Joe and Shirley Lichtenauer.

How would you like that cooked? Auto show well done in downtown Osage City

Vintage and classic cars lined Market Street April 13, 2019, as the Cruis’n and Cook’n Auto Show cooked up a good time in downtown Osage City. Photo by Sam Gomez.

Approximately 270 entrants participated in the 15th Annual Cruis’n & Cook’n Auto Show, Saturday, April 13, 2019, in downtown Osage City. Results of the show, hosted by the Twin Lakes Cruisers, are as follows:

Osage City welcomes shoppers for citywide garage sales, April 19-20, 2019

Free garage sale ads on Osage County News!

Osage City is opening its garage doors, driveways and yards to shoppers Friday and Saturday. The town’s citywide garage sales will be April 19 and 20, 2019, hosted by the Osage City Chamber of Commerce.

The Chamber has produced at map that lists sales all over town and designates which section of town and the types of goods for sale. Maps will be available at Casey’s and other local businesses Friday and Saturday.

Donations received for listing sales and for advertising on the map are used for a scholarship for a graduating senior from Osage City High School.

For more information, contact Tricia Gundy, Osage City Chamber garage sale committee chairperson, at 785-528-3301, or Peterson Assisted Living, 629 Holliday St., Osage City.

Remember you can post your own garage sale for free on Osage County News at www.osagecountyonline.com/place-your-own-garage-yard-sale-ad.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, April 1 – April 5, 2019

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, April 1 through April 5, 2019.

Osage County Jail Log, April 9 – April 13, 2019

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Kid cooks heat up the competition at Smoke in the Spring Kids-Q

A young chef carefully turns in her entry for Kids-Q to KCBS reps, from left, Dave and Peg Rogers, Linda and Dennis Polson, Mark Collier, and not pictured, Kim Collier, as local judges wait in anticipation. Jan Williams photo.

It’s a part of Smoke in the Spring that most folks don’t know is going on Friday evening, but you can bet there are some young cooks that have a watchful eye on their smokers for about three hours while everyone else is out enjoying the community barbecue party.

In the annual Kids-Q Competition, kid chefs compete in two age divisions, 10 and younger, and 11 and older. The cooks must be sponsored by one of the competition teams and cook their entries on site. At the cook’s meeting, the cooks are each given one pound of ground beef, donated this year by Allen Meat Processing, Allen, Kan., to cook however they choose.

Others who make Kids-Q possible are 24 local celebrity judges, who are instructed on the Kansas City Barbeque Society judging process before the kids’ turn-in time of 8 p.m. The kids contest is not a KCBS sanctioned part of Smoke in the Spring, but it is conducted according to KCBS rules and scoring. Judges are sequestered in the community building during the judging process.

At turn-in, the chefs bring their samples to the turn-in window at the community building, where the judging is conducted. The samples go to one of four tables of six judges each, where they are scored according to appearance, taste, and texture or tenderness. The judging process is the same as the sanctioned contest the next day.

Here are placing and payout results for the Smoke in the Spring Kids-Q held April 12, 2019:

Clark Crew wins third grand championship at Osage City

Travis Clark, Clark Crew BBQ, left, accepts his grand champion awards Saturday from contest organizer Corey Linton, right, and Amy Linton.

OSAGE CITY, Kan. – A Yukon, Okla., barbecue team has become the first team to be a three-time grand champion at the Smoke in the Spring State BBQ Championship, at Osage City, Kan, after claiming that title again Saturday.

Clark Crew BBQ, with head cook Travis Clark, has been sweeping barbecue championships across the Midwest the last few years, and added another Smoke in the Spring State BBQ Championship to that tally after a tight competition among top cooks on April 13, 2019, at Jones Park, in Osage City. The team previously won grand champion at the Osage City competition in 2016 and 2017.

Clark Crew squeezed out last year’s grand champs, Hogline BBQ, Dustin and Mary Reese, of Owatonna, Minn., who claimed reserve grand champion this year. Coming in third overall was Hunka Hunka Burnin’ Rub, Chris Hoisington, of Olathe, Kan.

Bernadine C. Dreher, 79, Tecumseh: June 7, 1939 – April 13, 2019

TECUMSEH, Kan. – Bernadine “Bernie” C. Dreher, 79, of Tecumseh, Kan., left this earth on April 13, 2019, surrounded by her family. She was born on June 7, 1939, in Topeka, Kan., the daughter of Leo Francis and Georgia Frances (Koehler) Donahue. They preceded her in death.

Bernie taught ceramics for a period of time. When Fred, husband of 61 years, retired from Santa Fe, they made ceramics and stoneware pieces, attending craft shows to sell them for more than 25 years. She was a member of Mater Dei Assumption Catholic Church.

Albert Smith, 95, Overbrook: July 17, 1923 – April 8, 2019

OVERBROOK, Kan. – Albert Smith, 95, passed away on Monday, April 8, 2019, at Midland Hospice House, Topeka, Kan. He was born on July 17, 1923, on the family farm north of Osage City, Kan., the son of Virgil and Florence Anderson Smith Sr.

Albert had lived near Richland, Kan., before moving to a farm north of Overbrook, Kan. Albert served in the United States Navy as a Petty Officer 2nd Class from 1943 to 1946 during World War II. He had farmed for 68 years.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Blaze best for grass

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“That’ll stop the smoke.”

Longtime farmer friend accessed another pour down walking out of church.

For several days, Flint Hills had been ablaze with smoke apparent in the sky every direction.

It was a haze drawing critical attention from a handful or so of large urban centers.

They were offended at the contamination and fright of hazardous damage to the environment.

Such a controversial issue has been pasture burning since beginning as necessary range management tool.

Fact is prairies were free of most intruders until ranchers started productive grazing programs.

Nature took care of itself, it’s said; lightning started fires, pastures burned, lush grass grew. Buffalo, deer, antelope, prairie chicken and creatures of the wild thrived on native rangeland.

Farmers and ranchers started planting trees of various sorts for windbreaks, home shade and landscaping.

Worthwhile endeavor until wildlife and wind were seeding trees all over the lands.

Then environmentalists encouraged various additional herbaceous plantings in attempting to slow land erosion.

“Helpful” plants soon were nature spread beyond eroding draws, washouts and steep acreage into land never intended.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas