Scranton parish celebrates 150 years of St. Patrick’s blessings and 100-year-old church

St. Patrick Church, at Scranton, Kan., has served its parish for 100 years. By Paul Schmidt St. Patrick Catholic Church, at Scranton, Kan., is celebrating its 100th anniversary as More »

Stained glass windows brighten Scranton church with rays of faith

By Paul Schmidt Stained glass windows donated by Mr. and Mrs. Michael Towle in 1941 still shine rays of light onto the congregation at St. Patrick Catholic Church, at More »

Hidden History: Congenial ghosts haunt Osage County socialites’ Halloween parties

“If a girl walks down the cellar stairs backwards peering into a mirror, she will see reflected therein the likeness of her future husband.” By Wendi Bevitt The year More »

Poster winners spread fire prevention messages

The 2017 Osage County Fire District No. 2 fire prevention poster winners were Angelica Ruiz-Pineda, Kaylee Theel, Grady Tincher, Kenzie Bellinger, Sophia Brabb, Jada Ruiz, Brynna Burd, Kalen Conner, More »

Osage City Kiwanis to install new officers

A division lieutenant governor and a district governor will be on hand as the Osage City Kiwanis family of clubs installs new officers for the 2017-18 year at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 23, 2017, at the Osage City Santa Fe Depot.

The local Kiwanis groups include the Osage City Kiwanis, Kiwanis Key Club, Kiwanis Builders Club and Kiwanis K-Kids.

Kansas Kiwanis Division XI Lt. Governor Tom Sirridge will conduct the installation. Kansas Kiwanis District Governor Jan Maxwell will be the guest speaker.

Families of the new officers are invited. Refreshments will be served. The Osage City Santa Fe Depot is at Fifth and Market streets, Osage City.

Scranton parish celebrates 150 years of St. Patrick’s blessings and 100-year-old church

St. Patrick Church, at Scranton, Kan., has served its parish for 100 years.

By Paul Schmidt

St. Patrick Catholic Church, at Scranton, Kan., is celebrating its 100th anniversary as a church building and 150 years as a parish in 2017.

Catholicism in early Kansas goes back to the mid 1500s with the explorations of the Spanish Franciscan friar, Fr. Juan de Padilla, who accompanied the Spanish conquistador, Francisco Vasquez de Coronado.

Statue of the church’s Patron Saint: St. Patrick.

Catholics had settled around the Scranton area as early as 1855. The first mass was celebrated near Scranton in 1855 in a private residence. Scranton was a distant served mission until 1876 when a more permanent, regular Catholic presence was established.

On Aug. 15, 1877, a lot was acquired in Scranton at the corner of Boyle and Mercer streets for the purpose of establishing a Catholic church building. A frame church was built on this location, serving about 120 people.

During Scranton’s boom, there was also a parochial school serving Catholic youth from 1885 to 1889.

The church’s bell was originally in the frame church building that existed until May 21, 1916, when the last mass was held in it. That bell is currently housed in the present church building.

Cornerstone of St. Patrick Church, Scranton: Celtic shamrock motif indicates s strong Irish presence in the parish’s history.

On June 7, 1916, the first spade was turned for the new St. Patrick Church in Scranton, to be located on the same site as the 1877 wooden structure. The cornerstone was laid in ceremony Oct. 2, 1917, officiated by then Archbishop John C. Ward of the Archdiocese of Leavenworth.

The strong Irish presence in the church is exemplified by the Celtic cross design graphic in the cornerstone as well as the shamrocks within the cross on the end corner stone. St. Patrick church has had strong Irish, German and Hispanic presence over its history.

Another prominent feature of the church’s chapel are the stained glass windows donated in 1941 by the Michael Towle family. The windows are on either side of the chapel, with one showing the chiro on the throne with the crown; the one on the north side is dedicated to and features symbolism of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Stained glass windows brighten Scranton church with rays of faith

By Paul Schmidt

Stained glass windows donated by Mr. and Mrs. Michael Towle in 1941 still shine rays of light onto the congregation at St. Patrick Catholic Church, at Scranton.

Michael Towle, 1859-1943, who was born in Waterford, Ireland, was a parishioner at the St. Patrick parish at Scranton. He and his wife, Mary (O’Brien) Towle, had 12 children, who all had interesting lives and occupations, including World War I veterans, teacher, author and a nurse. Three of the girls became Catholic sisters, and one of the boys, George, became a priest and ultimately a monsignor.

An interesting fact about Father George was his service in the U.S. Army as a captain and chaplain at Fort Leavenworth. It was there he served as the chaplain for what was to become the last mass execution in the U.S. – seven young German prisoner of war submariners were hanged.

The incident is recounted in Martial Justice (1971) by Richard Whittingham, and was also the subject of a 1997 History Channel one-hour documentary.

The Towle family windows represent a significant Osage County Catholic family and an amazingly heart wrenching episode of war, religion and justice.

The windows are on either side of the chapel, with one showing the chiro on the throne with the crown; the one on the north side is dedicated to and features symbolism of the Blessed Virgin Mary. To see the windows, stop St. Patrick Church is at 302 S. Boyle St., Scranton, Kan.

Hidden History: Congenial ghosts haunt Osage County socialites’ Halloween parties

“If a girl walks down the cellar stairs backwards peering into a mirror, she will see reflected therein the likeness of her future husband.”

By Wendi Bevitt

The year 1902 brought society’s newest fad to the east coast just in time for the Halloween season – the ghost party. Ghost parties were proclaimed as the “next best thing since ping pong” which had made its arrival 20 years prior. These parties were to herald the beginning of the Halloween season for the next few decades, making their appearance in Kansas in the middle of the decade.

Both young men and ladies would attend most times with the intention of making love connections. According to syndicated entertainment columnist Madame Merri, these parties would be announced by elaborate invitations either containing masks for the attendees to wear, or suggesting a costume to wear upon arrival to ensure unbiased matchmaking.

The host’s house or public venue would be decorated for fall or Halloween. Nellie Craig, of Osage City, hosted a ghost party decorated with jack o’ lanterns and fall leaves. Ethel Kelley, of Burlingame, transformed her parents’ spacious new barn into a “veritable bower of rustic beauty”, serving refreshments of apples and doughnuts, pumpkin pie and coffee. Some parties could even be decorated with just a simple white sheet for the table covering and candles to light the room.

Ghost party activities included dancing and Halloween games such as passing spooky items – a mechanical bug, a potato stuck full of toothpicks, a piece of fur, a Japanese snake, a piece of ice, a wet glove filled with sand – all thoroughly chilled for 12 hours.

C.S. Oliver, of Burlingame, held a party that included spooky activities in the cellar and attic. These parties also perpetuated superstitious games, such as one portrayed in the Charlotte News, Oct. 31, 1902, that suggests on Halloween, “If a girl walks down the cellar stairs backwards peering into a mirror, she will see reflected therein the likeness of her future husband.”

Help Wanted: Three Lakes Educational Cooperative seeks Paraeducators

Paraeducators (Full-Time & Substitutes) needed to provide classroom support for students in all Osage and West Franklin County schools at all grade levels. Full time paraeducator application is available online at www.three-lakes.org/employment or pick up application at Three Lakes Educational Cooperative, 1318 Topeka Ave., Lyndon, KS. Para subs must complete employment paperwork at our office.

OCN Sports Updates

See Osage County area sports updates as provided by local schools and fans below. If you know a score that’s not listed, you can log in to MaxPreps to be a game reporter. Scroll under each school listed to see recent or upcoming games.

Overbrook Overlook: Local talent to present fall patriotic concert

The Overbrook Performing Arts Concert Series will have a fall performance at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 29, 2017, at the library community room. The concert will have a patriotic theme honoring our country and veterans. Performers are all local talent. No reservations needed, and refreshments will be available following the concert for a freewill donation. All proceeds are used for future concerts.

Elections

Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, is Election Day. Overbrook area voters will decide positions on the USD 434 Board of Education and Frontier Extension District and residents will vote on Overbrook mayor and two city council seats.

In addition to the candidates listed on the ballot, write in candidates that agree to serve can be elected. If a council seat is not filled by election, the new mayor and council will fill the empty seat by appointment.

Candidates for city offices include Jon Brady, candidate for mayor, and Carol Baughman, candidate for city council, plus Sheila Dale and Cheryl Miller, both running as write-in candidates for city council seats. The newly elected will be sworn in to office at a special council meeting on Monday, Jan. 8, 2018.

Halloween celebration

The Overbrook community Halloween “Trunk-n-Treat” event will be 5-7 p.m. Tuesday Oct. 31. The annual event is hosted by the Overbrook Untied Methodist Church and has grown bigger and better every year over the last seven years. All residents, businesses, and groups are invited to participate. This year, it will be held at Overbrook City Lake.

Chili will be served starting at 5 p.m. Activities include trick or treating; chili and cinnamon rolls; fresh pressed apple cider. Also help stuff the jack-o-lanterns for Help House of Osage County. Bring non-perishable food items to donate.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, Oct. 9 – Oct. 13, 2017

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse Oct. 9 through Oct. 13, 2017.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month: It affects everyone

Domestic violence affects 1 in 4 women and 1 in 7 men; 15.5 million U.S. children live in families in which intimate partner violence occurred at least once in the past year. In 2016, SOS provided 11,936 services to victims of domestic or sexual assault – here in your community. This sad reality exists in every state, every community, every neighborhood. It’s not just a women’s issue or a family matter – domestic violence affects victims, witnesses, friends, and family.

Beyond the obvious physical and psychological wounds, victims can experience lost wages, inability to focus and thrive at work or school, difficulty maintaining personal relationships and more. Intimate partner violence is often not about anger at all; it is about power and control. Perpetrators of domestic violence may use a combination of tactics to gain and maintain dominance, power and control over their victim.

Those victimized by perpetrators of violence often feel lost, depressed or unworthy.

SOS is giving you the chance to “Stand by a Survivor” at the Flint Hills Mall, where you can take a selfie with the SOS mannequin to show your support. Then share your selfie, tag @soskansas and help name the mannequin that will help bring awareness to SOS services at future events and presentations.

SOS is a nonprofit agency that serves child and adult victims of sexual and domestic violence, child abuse or neglect, serving Osage, Chase, Coffey, Lyon, Greenwood, and Morris counties. You can stand with SOS against domestic violence by helping spread awareness.

Merle Marsh, 91, Carbondale: May 5, 1926 – Oct. 15, 2017

CARBONDALE, Kan. – Merle Marsh, 91, passed away on Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, at Stormont-Vail Hospital, Topeka, Kan. He was born on May 5, 1926, in Brewster, Minn., the son of Clayton and Esther Kistner Marsh.

Merle had lived in the Overbrook and Carbondale, Kan., communities since 1967. He graduated from Sioux City Leeds (Iowa) High School in 1944. He was asked to come to St. Louis, Mo., to try out for the Cardinals, but he had already enlisted. ​Merle then served in the United States Army Air Corps during World War II as a tail gunner in a B-17 bomber​. He worked as a ​terminal manager​ for Williams Pipeline​ for 42 years​ until his retirement in 1988. Merle was inducted into the Iowa Fast Pitch Hall of Fame, and ​was an avid sports participant and fan his entire life. He was a member of the Overbrook United Methodist Church.

Osage County Jail Log, Oct. 8 – Oct. 14, 2017

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

SIDS Awareness Month: Help prevent sudden infant death syndrome

By KDHE Secretary Susan Mosier 

Approximately 3,500 infants die annually in the United States from sleep-related infant deaths, including sudden infant death syndrome. October is Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Awareness Month, and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment remains committed to educating providers, parents, and caregivers about the risks associated with SIDS and how to keep infants safe during sleep.

While some sleep-related deaths are attributed to SIDS, many are complicated by factors related to unsafe sleep environments. KDHE reminds parents of the ABCs of Safe Sleep. Babies should always be placed to sleep Alone, on their Back, and in a safety-approved Crib that is free from blankets, bumpers, pillows and soft toys.

Sleep sacks are the safe way to keep babies warm while sleeping and help to avoid overheating. In addition, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends room sharing without bed-sharing as an effort to decrease the risk of SIDS. Parents are encouraged to set up a crib or a portable crib in their room, so that they can hear their baby and get to their baby easily for feedings – but the baby is not in the same bed with them.

Babies who share a sleep surface have an increased risk of suffocation, strangulation and asphyxia. Additional recommendations for SIDS reduction include the avoidance of exposure to smoke, alcohol and illicit drugs; breastfeeding; routine immunization; and use of a pacifier.

Ruth N. Liggett, 95, Topeka: Oct. 25, 1921 – Oct. 15, 2017

TOPEKA, Kan. – Ruth N. Liggett, 95, of Topeka, Kan., passed away on Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. She was born Oct. 25, 1921, at Topeka, the daughter of Jason and Vera Place Liggett.

Ruth was raised in rural north Topeka and later moved to Melvern, Kan. The family returned to Topeka where Ruth lived the rest of her life. She worked for more than 40 years at Halls Lithograph Company; she retired as a supervisor. She was a longtime member of First Free Methodist Church, Topeka, and served many years as the church secretary. Ruth had lived at the McCrite Retirement Community the past five years.

OCPR Update: Fall rolls in along with youth roundball

OCPR-logo-redSignup deadline is approaching for Osage City Parks and Recreation youth basketball for third through sixth graders. Practice begins at the end of November. Here are the details:

Youth Basketball
(3rd-6th grade boys and girls)

  • OCPR teams participate in the Scott Brown Youth Basketball League.
  • League divisions are split into single grades 3rd-6th grade for boys and girls.
  • Team practice can begin the week of November 27 if a team has a coach.
  • SBBL Season – Saturdays, Jan. 6 – Feb. 17, 2018.
  • SBBL League Divisional Tournaments, Feb. 24, 2018.
  • Players receive a team uniform (jersey and shorts).
  • Cost is $30 per player.

Signup Deadline, Nov. 6

Poster winners spread fire prevention messages

The 2017 Osage County Fire District No. 2 fire prevention poster winners were Angelica Ruiz-Pineda, Kaylee Theel, Grady Tincher, Kenzie Bellinger, Sophia Brabb, Jada Ruiz, Brynna Burd, Kalen Conner, Lillian Lohmeyer, Harrison Bailey, Allison Sloop, Quenten Stark, Dakota Boss, Isaac McCoy, Sadie Shoemaker.

Osage County Fire District No. 2 gave fire prevention poster winners a ride to school in fire trucks Friday Oct. 13, 2017. Around 8 a.m., a crowd of proud parents and fire department personnel gave a send off to the poster winners as they departed and transported to Osage City Elementary School. Throughout the day Friday, firefighters gave fire prevention presentations to students at Osage City Elementary School, Three Lakes Preschool at Osage City, and Osage City preschool.

A Cowboy’s Faith: The most heartfelt assistance

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Cowboys and cowgirls help one of their own.”

There’ve been sarcastic remarks about contestants doing whatever it takes to beat the opponent. That might be true in certain sports and work environments. It may even occur somewhere in the horse world, but that’s sure not the case in several horseshow circuits.

Some might claim it’s due to seniority, maturity, being an old cowboy. While perhaps occasional indication of such, everybody is always eager to help another.

From wishing good luck, to congratulatory comment, to sympathetic understanding, to advice, to helping hand, whatever, congeniality is forever present.

Most fortunate it is as assistance has been sought increasingly throughout the season.

Outstanding speed event mounts want to do their best every out. Like with athletes in many fields, anticipating nerves create tension expressed in various ways.

Cody rides like a stock horse pleasure winner in the pasture, and warming up in competition pen. Third sense takes ahold when it’s run time becoming extremely cautious about entering the arena.

Without request, help is immediately provided from fellow contestants, gatekeepers, even bystanders. That’s from coaxing to driving to leading from the ground or horseback into the course so the race begins.

No matter the time and experience working with horses, things are still done with poor judgment, being plain dumb. Caring horseshow friends granted most gracious support to every degree when Maggie, rider just mounting, went over backwards.

Handler error admitted; with no blame whatsoever to the smart horse. Still, hard landing made imagined throb slow movement, while damage was real to the horn-broken saddle.

KDWPT schedules free shotgun and archery training for young sportsmen

COUNCIL GROVE, Kan. – Area youth are invited to attend a free shotgun and archery shooting and safety clinic on Saturday, Oct. 28 at Council Grove Lake. This special one-day event will provide participants with an opportunity to enhance firearm and archery shooting and safety skills. Controlled live-fire instruction will teach safe, responsible, and fun shooting techniques. Sponsors include the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Flint Hills Chapter of Quail and Upland Wildlife Federation, the Chisholm Trail Chapter of Safari Club International, the Bill Young Foundation, and Morris County Hunter Education instructors.

Shooting skills will be taught by certified firearm, archery, and hunter education instructors. All gear and supplies, including shotguns, shells, bows, arrows, targets, and eye and ear protection will be provided by KDWPT’s “Pass It On” hunter education and Archery in the Schools programs. Participants need only a desire to learn some valuable and safe techniques and have fun. Teaching methods almost guarantee that students will be breaking clay targets by the end of the session.

Caution on the road: Deer-vehicle crashes increase in fall

Mating season and the quest for more secure habitat have deer on the move this time of year, increasing the chances of vehicle collisions.

Typically, the greatest number of deer-vehicle crashes are in mid-November when the rut, or mating season, peaks. In addition to the rut, deer are also on the move in mid-fall seeking new food sources and shelter as crops are harvested and leaves fall from trees and shrubs, leaving them less secure than in their summer habitats.

“The deer population has stabilized over the last five years, so areas that have had deer likely still have them,” said Levi Jaster, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism big game coordinator. “Young animals are dispersing to find new areas and breeding season is approaching. More animals moving means more of them are going to be crossing roads, so be extra cautious and reduce speed, especially in areas with good deer habitat.”

USDA processing pending Conservation Reserve Program continuous enrollment offers

Acceptance of most 2018 offers temporarily suspended

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced that it will process many pending eligible offers for land enrollment in the Conservation Reserve Program, and it will temporarily suspend accepting most new offers until later in the 2018 fiscal year.

“All current, eligible CRP continuous enrollment offers made through Sept. 30, 2017 – except for those made under the Pollinator Habitat Initiative – will be approved,” said Steven J. Peterson, acting Farm Service Agency administrator. “Additionally, we are temporarily suspending acceptance of most offers going forward to provide time to review CRP allocation levels, and to avoid exceeding the statutory cap of 24 million acres.”

Celebrating after school programs: OAC to keep ‘Lights on Afterschool’

Community members are invited to Overbrook Attendance Center for an open house at 4-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017, to see students in the Kansas Reading Roadmap “Lights on Afterschool” program.

The event is one of more than an expected 8,000 Lights on Afterschool events across America, an annual nationwide celebration of afterschool programs organized by the Afterschool Alliance.

Osage City fire department to host open firehouse

Kids lived their dreams of being firefighters during OCFD No. 2’s open house last year.

To wind up Fire Prevention Week, Osage County Fire District No. 2, based at Osage City, will host an open house Sunday and transport fire prevention poster winners to school in fire trucks Friday.

On Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, the fire district will host its annual open house, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the fire station. Local firefighters will offer fire prevention safety tips and fire truck rides. A LifeStar helicopter is scheduled to land and be available for inspection. Child safety seat technicians will be available to check child safety seats, and there will be door prizes, smoke detector batteries and food (while available).

Fire district personnel will meet poster winners early Friday morning at the station, from where they will head to school in fire trucks. During the day, firefighters will give fire prevention presentations to students at Osage City Elementary School, Three Lakes Pre-School, Osage City, and Osage City preschool.

The Osage County Fire District No. 2 station is at 911 Laing St., Osage City.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas