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Pomona Lake back on warning status for blue-green algae

KDHE issues blue-green algae public health advisories for Kansas lakes

TOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment and the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks have issued public health advisory updates due to blue-green algae. Pomona Lake in Osage County was added to the warning list June 8, 2023, along with four other Kansas lakes. Four lakes were listed as under watch status, including Marion Lake which had been downgraded from a warning the previous week.

In addition to Pomona Lake, other lakes on the warning list include Big Eleven Lake, Wyandotte County, Webster Lake, Rooks County, Wellington Lake, Sumner County, and Mount Hope-Woodland Park Pond, Sedgwick County. On the watch list are Augusta Santa Fe Lake, Butler County, Harvey County East Lake, Harvey County, Marion Lake, Marion County (lowered June 8), and Milford Lake Zone A, Dickinson and Geary counties.

A harmful algal bloom may look like foam, scum or paint floating on the water, and be colored blue, bright green, brown or red. Blooms can develop rapidly; if the water appears suspicious or there is decaying algae on the shore, avoid contact and keep dogs away. These toxins can be absorbed by ingestion, inhalation of aerosols and even skin contact. Symptoms vary depending upon the type of exposure, such as direct contact, ingestion, inhalation, but can include rash, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, sore throat, and headache. Any person or dogs that come into contact with algae is advised to rinse the area with clean, fresh water. Suspected harmful algal bloom-related health incidents, whether human or animal, regardless of season, should be reported at kdhe.ks.gov/1163.

Kansas recognizes three advisory levels for blue-green algae blooms: hazard, warning, and watch. Hazard status indicates that a harmful algal bloom is present, and extreme conditions exist. Warning status indicates that conditions are unsafe for human and pet exposure, and contact with the waterbody should be avoided. Watch status means that blue-green algae have been detected and a harmful algal bloom is present or likely to develop; people are encouraged to avoid areas of algae accumulation and keep pets and livestock away from the water.

For information on blue-green algae and reporting potential harmful algal blooms, see kdhe.ks.gov/HAB.

KDHE places Pomona Lake under blue-green algae warning

OSAGE COUNTY, Kan. – Two Osage County lakes are now under public health advisories due to the presence of blue-green algae. Kansas Department of Health and Environment issued a warning advisory for Pomona Lake, May 18, 2023, and Melvern Lake remains under a watch advisory for a second week. The only other Kansas lake currently under an advisory, Big Eleven Lake, in Wyandotte County, was placed on watch status Thursday.

A harmful algal bloom may look like foam, scum or paint floating on the water and be colored blue, bright green, brown or red. Blooms can develop rapidly; if the water appears suspicious or there is decaying algae on the shore, avoid contact and keep dogs away. These toxins can be absorbed by ingestion, inhalation of aerosols and even skin contact. Symptoms vary depending upon the type of exposure, such as direct contact, ingestion, and inhalation, but can include rash, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, sore throat, and headache. Anyone or their dogs that come into contact with algae is advised rinse the area with clean, fresh water. Suspected HAB-related health incidents, whether human or animal, regardless of season, should be reported at kdhe.ks.gov/1163.

A warning status indicates that conditions are unsafe for human and pet exposure.  Contact with the waterbody should be avoided. A watch status means that blue-green algae have been detected and a harmful algal bloom is present or likely to develop. People are encouraged to avoid areas of algae accumulation and keep pets and livestock away from the water.

When a warning is issued, KDHE recommends the following precautions be taken:

  • Signage should be posted at all public access locations.
  • Inhalation of spray or aerosols may be harmful.
  • Lake water is not safe to drink for pets or livestock.
  • Lake water, regardless of blue-green algae status, should never be consumed by humans.
  • Water contact should be avoided.
  • Fish may be eaten if they are rinsed with clean water and only the fillet portion is consumed, while all other parts are discarded.
  • Do not allow pets to eat dried algae.
  • If lake water contacts skin, wash with clean water as soon as possible.
  • Avoid areas of visible algae accumulation.

Scum or paint-like surface on the water, small floating blue-green clumps or filaments in the water, or water that is an opaque green should be avoided by humans and dogs should be kept away. These are indications that a harmful bloom may be present. Pet owners should be aware that animals that swim in or drink water affected by a harmful algal bloom or eat dried algae along the shore may become seriously ill or die.

For information on blue-green algae and reporting potential harmful algal blooms, see kdhe.ks.gov/HAB.

Pomona Lake under blue-green algae warning; water contact should be avoided

POMONA LAKE, Kan. – Pomona Lake was placed on a warning status due to the presence of blue-green algae, and two other Osage County Lakes remain under a watch status today.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment and the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks have issued several public health advisories for Kansas lakes due to blue-green algae. Melvern Lake and Carbondale City Lake are on KDHE’s watch list.

A harmful algal bloom may look like foam, scum or paint floating on the water and be colored blue, bright green, brown or red. Blooms can develop rapidly; if the water appears suspicious or there is decaying algae on the shore, avoid contact and keep dogs away. These toxins can be absorbed by ingestion, inhalation of aerosols and even skin contact. Symptoms vary depending upon the type of exposure, such as direct contact, ingestion, or inhalation, but can include rash, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, sore throat, and headache. If people or dogs come into contact with algae, rinse the area with clean, fresh water. Suspected harmful algal bloom-related health incidents, whether human or animal, regardless of season, should be reported to KDHE at www.kdhe.ks.gov.

A warning status indicates that conditions are unsafe for human and pet exposure. Contact with the waterbody should be avoided. When a warning is issued, KDHE recommends the following precautions be taken:

  • Lake water is not safe to drink for pets or livestock.
  • Lake water, regardless of blue-green algae status, should never be consumed by humans.
  • Water contact should be avoided.
  • Fish may be eaten if they are rinsed with clean water and only the fillet portion is consumed, while all other parts are discarded.
  • Do not allow pets to eat dried algae.
  • If lake water contacts skin, wash with clean water as soon as possible.
  • Avoid areas of visible algae accumulation.

A watch status means that blue-green algae have been detected and a harmful algal bloom is present or likely to develop. People are encouraged to avoid areas of algae accumulation and keep pets and livestock away from the water.

During the watch status, KDHE recommends the following precautions be taken:

  • Signage will be posted at all public access locations.
  • Water may be unsafe for humans or animals.
  • Avoid areas of algae accumulation and do not let people or pets eat dried algae or drink contaminated water.
  • Swimming, wading, skiing and jet skiing are discouraged near visible blooms.
  • Boating and fishing are safe. However, inhalation of the spray may affect some individuals. Avoid direct contact with water, and wash with clean water after any contact.
  • Clean fish well with potable water and eat fillet portion only.

KDHE investigates publicly-accessible bodies of water for blue-green algae when the agency receives reports of potential algae blooms in Kansas lakes. Based on credible field observation and sampling results, KDHE reports on potentially harmful conditions.

Anyone who observes a scum or paint-like surface on the water, small floating blue-green clumps or filaments in the water, or if the water is an opaque green, should avoid contact and keep pets away. These are indications that a harmful bloom may be present. Pet owners should be aware that animals that swim in or drink water affected by a harmful algal bloom or eat dried algae along the shore may become seriously ill or die.

Expand catfishing horizons at Pomona Lake as floatline season opens

PRATT – Want to expand your catfishing horizons? Floatline fishing, sometimes called jugline fishing, is a fun and effective method for catching catfish in reservoirs.

If you remember the excitement of watching a bobber when you were a kid, floatline fishing is bobber fishing on steroids. Big “bobbers” and big fish.

The floatline fishing season opened July 15 and closes September 15, and it’s allowed on 12 select reservoirs, including Pomona, Council Grove, Elk City, Fall River, Glen Elder, Hillsdale, John Redmond, Kanopolis, Lovewell, Tuttle Creek, Toronto and Wilson.

Floatline fishing consists of free drifting large floats, each fitted with line, a hook, and weight. Floats drift with the breeze, suspending the baited hook. When the float begins bobbing up and down or moving unnaturally, you’ve got a bite.

Floatline fishing is allowed from sunrise to sunset and anglers are allowed up to eight floatlines, which must be under immediate supervision of the angler at all times, and removed from the water when fishing ceases. Floats must be made only from plastic, wood, or foam and shall be a closed-cell construction, meaning a solid body incapable of containing water.

Outdoors: Fishing reports for Melvern Lake, Pomona Lake and Osage County Fishing Lake

The following fishing and lake reports for Osage County lakes were provided by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism.

Young fishermen brave flood waters to compete for Pomona Lake fishing titles

Two fishermen discuss the best bait to use for Saturday’s kids fishing competition at Pomona State Park.

Though the day started out cloudy with a few scattered large raindrops, dedicated fishermen of all ages lined the banks at Pomona State Park’s boat ramp No. 2 Saturday for the Friends of Pomona State Park’s annual kids fishing derby.

Outdoors: Fishing reports for Melvern Lake, Pomona Lake and Osage County Fishing Lake

The following fishing and lake reports for Osage County lakes were provided by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism.

Outdoors: Fishing reports for Melvern Lake, Pomona Lake and Osage County Fishing Lake

The following fishing and lake reports for Osage County lakes were provided by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism.

Ottawa woman found dead in Pomona Lake Sunday

The Osage County Sheriff’s Office has reported that an Ottawa woman was found dead in Pomona Lake on Sunday.

In a press release issued today, Osage County Sheriff Laurie Dunn said that Cynthia Steward, 44, of Ottawa, was found in the lake after emergency personnel responded to a report of body near the boat ramp at 110-Mile Park around 3:25 p.m. Sunday.

The sheriff reported that after further investigation and after a report of missing kayaker, it was determined the victim was Steward. The release said Steward had gone kayaking around 4:30 p.m. Saturday, and her family notified the sheriff’s office she was missing about 5:15 p.m. Sunday.

An autopsy is being conducted to determine the cause of Steward’s death.

“The autopsy will help determine whether Mrs. Steward had drowned or possibly died of hypothermia,” Dunn said in the release.

Outdoors: Fishing reports for Melvern Lake, Pomona Lake and Osage County Fishing Lake

The following fishing and lake reports for Osage County lakes were provided by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism.

Outdoors: Fishing reports for Melvern Lake, Pomona Lake and Osage County Fishing Lake

The following fishing and lake reports for Osage County lakes were provided by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism.

Camp as if it were 1964: Go retro at Pomona Lake with vintage campers, car cruise

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Greg Thill, Lyndon, drove his 1959 Chevy Impala in area parades to remind everyone of the July 12 Going Retro at Pomona Lake.

It will be a fun weekend to visit Pomona State Park and step back in time, as Pomona Lake “goes retro” as part of the lake’s 50th anniversary celebration. Friends of Pomona State Park has invited owners of vintage boats, campers and recreational vehicles to visit or camp at the lake during “Going Retro at Pomona Lake” this weekend, July 11-13. A classic car “cruise-in” is also planned for Saturday.

Pomona Lake campers named as first members of the 50 on 50 club

Jayson Sunderland, interim Pomona State Park manager, left, David Green, Pomona Lake operations manager, right, and Will Bolt, Pomona Lake park ranger, present a framed certificate to Doug and Jean Higbie, of Williamsburg, in recognition of the couple camping more than 50 nights at Pomona Lake this year.

The U.S. Corps of Engineers and Pomona State Park have announced the first campers to become part of the “50 on 50” club, as part of the celebration of Pomona Lake’s 50th anniversary.

Doug and Jean Higbie, of Williamsburg, were recently notified they are the first 50 on 50 club members, after having camped for 56 nights already this year at Pomona Lake State Park.

Pomona Lake 50th anniversary logo unveiled

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Pomona Project, has released the official logo of Pomona Lake’s 50th anniversary, to be celebrated this year.

During a meeting Jan. 29, Corps officials reported the logo was in development, and would be available for use during the celebration. The Corps will use the same logo with the addition of the Corps’ insignia, but a logo without the insignia is being made available to promote this year’s celebration. The logo can be used on flyers and advertising to promote events, activities, special offers or other highlights of the communitywide celebration.

On Windy Hill: Let’s celebrate 50 years of Pomona Lake hospitality

Last week, a few folks sat down at Breck’s Green Acres, near Pomona Dam, for a cinnamon roll and coffee, and to discuss a milestone of a local landmark that has had notable impact on Osage County and its inhabitants for more than 50 years.

The topic of discussion was how to celebrate Pomona Lake’s 50th anniversary. The lake was dedicated in September 1964.

The gathering of local government employees, business people and interested citizens agreed the lake’s 50th birthday is something to celebrate. But also agreed was that funds are scarce for promoting and hosting a grand celebration, excepting possible grass-roots fundraising efforts. Federal, state and county governments are more strapped for cash now than any time in the lake’s 50 years, it seems.

Young anglers catch stringer-full of prizes during Pomona Lake fishing derby

About 40 youth and 50 adults enjoyed a beautiful Saturday morning at Pomona State Park during the Friends of Pomona State Park Annual Memorial Youth Fishing Derby on June 1.

Outdoors: Fishing reports for Melvern Lake, Osage County Fishing Lake, Pomona Lake

The following fishing reports for Osage County lakes were provided by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Outdoors: Fishing reports for Melvern Lake, Osage County Fishing Lake, Pomona Lake

The following fishing reports for Osage County lakes were provided by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

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