Search Results for: lakes

Help Wanted: Three Lakes Educational Cooperative seeks Paraeducators

Paraeducators (Full-Time & Substitutes) needed to provide classroom support for students in all Osage and West Franklin County schools at all grade levels. Full time paraeducator application is available online at www.three-lakes.org/employment or pick up application at Three Lakes Educational Cooperative, 1318 Topeka Ave., Lyndon, KS. Para subs must complete employment paperwork at our office.

Overbrook City Lake no longer under algae warning; enjoy fall at local lakes

Summer might be over, but with fair weather, Overbrook City Lake and Friesen Fishing Lake continue to offer residents and visitors peaceful spots for reflection, walking or fishing. Benches installed in 2015 have been placed on the fishing dock, with one honoring the late Max Friesen for his many years of service. Photo thanks to city of Overbrook.

The city of Overbrook was notified that results of testing for blue-green algae from the week of Sept. 11, 2017, has allowed the Overbrook City Lake to be downgraded from warning to watch status by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

The lake was put under warning for blue green algae the week of Sept. 1. The lake was not closed, but officials recommended avoiding contact with the water, and rinsing any fish caught with clean water.

Despite the lake’s former-warning status, the city’s lakes were still open for fishing and other activities. According to Overbrook City Clerk Jim Koger, 100 children participated in the Steve Cross Memorial Children’s Fishing Derby Saturday at the Children’s Fishing Pond, at Jones Park. He noted that due to great support from the community and national sponsors, each of the children were given a new fishing rod and reel.

Two other lakes in Osage County remain under warning for blue-green algae, Melvern Outlet River Pond and Melvern Outlet Swim Pond.

If a lake is under a public health warning for blue-green algae, activities such as boating and fishing may be safe. However, direct contact with water, such as wading, skiing and swimming, is strongly discouraged for people, pets and livestock.

Five Kansas lakes under public health warning due to blue-green algae

TOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment, in conjunction with the Kansas Department of Wildlife Parks and Tourism, has issued a public health warning for five lakes due to a harmful algal bloom.

If a lake is under a public health warning for blue-green algae, activities such as boating and fishing may be safe. However, direct contact with water, such as wading, skiing and swimming, is strongly discouraged for people, pets and livestock. The lakes currently under a watch or warning status are:

  • Warning: Keith Sebelius Reservoir, Norton County
  • Warning: Kirwin Lake, Phillips County
  • Warning: Marion County Lake, Marion County
  • Warning: Marion Reservoir, Marion County
  • Warning: Sam’s Pond, Syracuse, Hamilton County
  • Watch: Webster Lake, Rooks County

Lakes under a warning are not closed. Marinas, lakeside businesses and park camping facilities are open for business. If swim beaches are closed, it will be specifically noted. Drinking water and showers at parks are safe and not affected by algae blooms. Boating and fishing are safe on lakes under a warning, but contact with the water should be avoided. It is safe to eat fish caught during a harmful blue-green algae outbreak, as long as the fish is rinsed with clean water. Only the fillet portion should be consumed, and all other parts should be discarded. Hands should also be washed with clean water after handling fish taken from an affected lake. Zoned lakes may have portions fully open for all recreation even if other portions are under a warning.

Zebra mussels continue infestation of Kansas lakes

Two more lakes found to have invasive mollusks

050814-zebraTOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism has confirmed the presence of invasive zebra mussels in Wellington Lake in Sumner County earlier this month. Wellington city staff discovered the invasive, sharp-shelled mollusks as they replaced buoy lines. KDWPT staff subsequently found well-established populations of zebra mussels of various ages in the old and new parts of the lake.

In May, KDWPT confirmed the presence of invasive zebra mussels in Paola City Lake, or Lake Miola, in Miami County. On May 23, an angler snagged an old fishing rod near the boat ramp with live adult zebra mussels attached and reported it to the local KDWPT game warden. KDWPT aquatic nuisance species staff subsequently found more zebra mussels of various ages in several parts of the lake. The population appears to be well-established.

Wellington Lake covers approximately 675 surface acres, and is managed by the city of Wellington. Lake Miola covers approximately 220 acres and is managed by the city of Paola.

KDWPT manages both lakes’ fisheries as part of the department’s Community Fisheries Assistance Program (CFAP).

Both lakes offer outdoor activities such as boating, skiing, swimming, fishing, camping and hiking. Jessica Howell, KDWPT aquatic nuisance species coordinator, reminds lake visitors that everyone using the lakes plays a key role in stemming the spread of mussels to uninfested lakes.

“This situation shows how important it is for boaters, anglers, swimmers and skiers to be aware of aquatic nuisance species (ANS) and to take precautions to prevent their spread,” Howell said.  

Anglers encouraged to use caution on ice covered lakes

Warmer temperatures will begin causing weak spots on frozen waters 

PRATT – A recent cold-spell had many Kansas lakes covered in thick ice, creating ideal conditions for ice fishing, but even with very cold temperatures, ice anglers must be vigilant. Now that temperatures are warming, extreme caution must be used in avoiding weak spots on lakes and reservoirs.

If you have an itch to drop a line this winter, keep these following common-sense ice safety rules in mind:

Spring rains fill local ponds and lakes

As pond-filling rains ended Tuesday afternoon, Dragoon Creek at U.S. 75 looked more like the Dragoon River, with rapid flow pouring into Pomona Lake. Rain gauges showed 2 to 4 inches fell across Osage County Monday and Tuesday. With another inch or so added overnight Wednesday, Pomona Lake’s elevation was 977.62 feet Thursday; normal pool elevation is 974.

Outdoors: Frozen lakes require extreme caution

PRATT – After nighttime temperatures in the single-digits and daytime highs in the teens and twenties, most Kansas water bodies are covered with a sheet of ice. While beautiful and perhaps alluring to anglers and explorers, a frozen lake can be deadly and deserves respect and caution.

Corps urges waterfowl hunters to be safe on area lakes

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – The Kansas City District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers urges hunters to be safe and take precautions this winter when hunting at any of the district’s 18 lakes throughout Missouri, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska.

Most waterfowl hunters do not think of themselves as “boaters.” The boat is just a mode of transportation to reach their favorite hunting spot; as a consequence, they do not consider the safety precautions that are important for a safe and enjoyable hunting trip. Packing boats beyond capacity with decoys, guns, dogs, gear, and their buddies creates a very dangerous safety hazard. 

Corps to reopen area lakes’ operations

Pomona, Melvern lakes’ federal facilities to be open by Friday

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Kansas City District is reopening operations following the shutdown of the federal government for lack of fiscal 2014 funding legislation which began on October 1. This includes visitor centers, boat ramps and similar facilities that are typically open this time of year at all 18 of the district’s lake projects. The following camping areas will be reopened by Friday, October 18:

Pomona Lake, Kan. – Outlet, 110 Mile, Cedar, and Wolf Creek Group Camp; Melvern Lake, Kan. – Outlet and Sundance parks;

Federal recreation areas closed at Melvern and Pomona lakes

KANSAS CITY – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Kansas City District has closed USACE-operated campgrounds and day-use parks due to the shutdown of the federal government for lack of fiscal 2014 funding legislation. The closure includes federal facilities at Melvern and Pomona lakes.

Affected recreation areas will remain closed until after the shutdown is lifted. This includes all visitor facilities, campgrounds, boat ramps and similar facilities at all 18 lake projects in the Kansas City District.

Zebra mussels found in two more Kansas lakes

Glen Elder Reservoir and Lake Wabaunsee have the invasive species

TOPEKA – The Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism has confirmed the presence of zebra mussels in Glen Elder Reservoir (Waconda Lake), in Mitchell County, and Lake Wabaunsee, in Wabaunsee County. Zebra mussels are bean-sized mollusks with striped, sharp-edged, two-part shells. Twenty-one Kansas lakes have now been confirmed to have zebra mussels.

“These latest discoveries show how important it is for the public to be aware of the dangers of aquatic nuisance species (ANS) and to take precautions to prevent their spread,” said Jessica Howell, KDWPT aquatic nuisance species coordinator.

Poster winners spread fire prevention messages

The 2017 Osage County Fire District No. 2 fire prevention poster winners were Angelica Ruiz-Pineda, Kaylee Theel, Grady Tincher, Kenzie Bellinger, Sophia Brabb, Jada Ruiz, Brynna Burd, Kalen Conner, Lillian Lohmeyer, Harrison Bailey, Allison Sloop, Quenten Stark, Dakota Boss, Isaac McCoy, Sadie Shoemaker.

Osage County Fire District No. 2 gave fire prevention poster winners a ride to school in fire trucks Friday Oct. 13, 2017. Around 8 a.m., a crowd of proud parents and fire department personnel gave a send off to the poster winners as they departed and transported to Osage City Elementary School. Throughout the day Friday, firefighters gave fire prevention presentations to students at Osage City Elementary School, Three Lakes Preschool at Osage City, and Osage City preschool.

Osage City fire department to host open firehouse

Kids lived their dreams of being firefighters during OCFD No. 2’s open house last year.

To wind up Fire Prevention Week, Osage County Fire District No. 2, based at Osage City, will host an open house Sunday and transport fire prevention poster winners to school in fire trucks Friday.

On Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, the fire district will host its annual open house, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the fire station. Local firefighters will offer fire prevention safety tips and fire truck rides. A LifeStar helicopter is scheduled to land and be available for inspection. Child safety seat technicians will be available to check child safety seats, and there will be door prizes, smoke detector batteries and food (while available).

Fire district personnel will meet poster winners early Friday morning at the station, from where they will head to school in fire trucks. During the day, firefighters will give fire prevention presentations to students at Osage City Elementary School, Three Lakes Pre-School, Osage City, and Osage City preschool.

The Osage County Fire District No. 2 station is at 911 Laing St., Osage City.

Back in Time: Whirlwind of land acquisition floods Marais des Cygnes Valley

Shown in a June 1975 photo of Melvern Lake, its then-new 12-story control tower is already a landmark on the water.

About 1972, Corps of Engineers attorneys obtained easement for the Melvern Reservoir in Osage County, Kan. The details involved in acquiring an easement for land to be flooded by the Melvern Reservoir in Osage County, Kan., is explained by a Corps of Engineers attorney, Ben Bonner, left, to sellers of the easement, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Evertson, of Topeka, Kan. The easement permitted flooding of 180 acres of the 350-acre tract owned by the couple. Exemplifying the speed of the process, the Evertsons received their check 10 days after signing the agreement.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, Sept. 11 – Sept. 15, 2017

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, Sept. 11 through Sept. 15, 2017.

Overbrook City Lake joins others in Kansas under warning for blue-green algae

Overbrook City Lake has now joined others across the state to be under warning for blue-green algae blooms.

According to the city of Overbrook, Kansas Department of Health and Environment re-tested this week due to the heavy rain on the scheduled date of test last week.  As a result of the testing, Overbrook City Lake is now in warning status for a blue-green algae bloom.

Two other lakes in Osage County, Melvern Lake Outlet River Pond and Melvern Lake Outlet Swim Pond also remain under a warning for blue-green algae, as they have been for several weeks.

Thursday, KDHE and the Kansas Department of Wildlife Parks and Tourism issued a public health warning for 10 lakes across the state and a watch for three lakes due to harmful algae blooms.

If a lake is under a public health warning for blue-green algae, activities such as boating and fishing may be safe. However, direct contact with water such as wading, skiing and swimming, is strongly discouraged for people, pets and livestock.

Blue-green algae warning continues: Melvern Outlet River Pond, Melvern Outlet Swim Pond

TOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment in conjunction with the Kansas Department of Wildlife Parks and Tourism has issued a public health warning for six lakes, including two ponds at Melvern Lake, and a watch for six lakes due to harmful algal blooms. Overbrook City Lake is one of the lakes that remain under watch for blue-green algae.

If a lake is under a public health warning for blue-green algae, activities such as boating and fishing may be safe. However, direct contact with water (i.e., wading, skiing and swimming) is strongly discouraged for people, pets and livestock. The lakes currently under a watch or warning status are:

  • Warning: Melvern Outlet River Pond, Osage County
  • Warning: Melvern Outlet Swim Pond, Osage County
  • Warning: Central Park Lake, Shawnee County
  • Warning: Marion County Lake, Marion County
  • Warning: Milford Reservoir (Zones B and C), Geary, Dickinson and Clay counties
  • Warning: Webster Lake, Rooks County
  • Watch: Milford Reservoir (Zone A), Geary, Dickinson and Clay counties
  • Watch: Overbrook City Lake, Osage County
  • Watch: Perry Lake (Zone C), Jefferson County
  • Watch: Sam’s Pond, Syracuse, Hamilton County
  • Watch: South Lake, Johnson County
  • Watch: Villa High Lake, Thomas County

Lakes under a warning are not closed. Marinas, lakeside businesses and park camping facilities are open for business. If swim beaches are closed, it will be specifically noted. Drinking water and showers at parks are safe and not affected by algae blooms. Boating and fishing are safe on lakes under a warning, but contact with the water should be avoided. It is safe to eat fish caught during a harmful blue-green algae outbreak, as long as the fish is rinsed with clean water. Only the fillet portion should be consumed, and all other parts should be discarded. Hands should also be washed with clean water after handling fish taken from an affected lake. Zoned lakes may have portions fully open for all recreation even if other portions are under a warning.

Melvern Lake open for business despite blue-green algae warning at outlet ponds

Melvern Lake’s Coeur d’Alene swim beach awaits beach lovers even though the lake’s outlet ponds are under algae warning.

A blue-green algae warning continues for two popular ponds adjacent to Melvern Lake. A warning covering Melvern Outlet River Pond and Melvern Outlet Swim Pond was issued last week, along with an announcement of the closure of Outlet Swim Beach.

The presence of blue-green algae was confirmed in the ponds, with the warning based on cyanobacteria/toxin results from Aug. 3 and 8, 2017, testing conducted by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

With the swim beach closed, those looking to swim are encouraged to go to Coeur d’Alene swim beach.

The Melvern outlet ponds are among five lakes in the state under warning for blue-green algae, including Central Park Lake, Shawnee County, Marion County Lake, Marion County, and Webster Lake, Rooks County.

Lakes under a warning are not closed. Marinas, lakeside businesses and park camping facilities are open for business. If swim beaches are closed, it will be specifically noted. Drinking water and showers at parks are safe and not affected by algae blooms. Boating and fishing are safe on lakes under a warning, but contact with the water should be avoided. It is safe to eat fish caught during a harmful blue-green algae outbreak, as long as the fish is rinsed with clean water. Only the fillet portion should be consumed, and all other parts should be discarded. Hands should also be washed with clean water after handling fish taken from an affected lake. Zoned lakes may have portions fully open for all recreation even if other portions are under a warning.

Another Osage County lake, Overbrook City Lake, remains under a blue-green algae watch. Also under watches are Milford Reservoir in all zones in Geary, Dickinson and Clay counties; Sam’s Pond, Syracuse, Hamilton County; South Lake, Johnson County and Villa High Lake, Thomas County.

Corps closes swimming beach and issues public health warning for Melvern Lake Outlet Ponds

MELVERN, Kan. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced today the existence of a blue-green algae bloom at the Outlet Campground River Pond and Outlet Swim Beach/Fish Rearing Pond downstream of Melvern Lake, in Osage County, Kan.

These ponds are currently under a warning based on cyanobacteria and toxin results from Aug. 3, 2017, testing conducted by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. As a result, the swim beach at Outlet Swim Beach/Fish Rearing Pond is closed until further notice.  All other facilities in Outlet Park and Melvern Lake remain open.

The present algae bloom is isolated to the Outlet Campground River Pond and Outlet Swim Beach/Fish Rearing Pond below Melvern Lake Dam. Lake visitors can still use the Coeur d’ Alene swim beach on the main lake. Boat ramps and main lake activities are not affected. Marinas, lakeside businesses and park camping facilities are open for business. Drinking water and showers at parks are safe and not affected by algae blooms.

Hot and sunny weather conditions combined with high nutrient levels create ideal conditions for harmful algae bloom growth. Blue-green algae blooms are unpredictable. They can develop rapidly and may float or drift around the lake, requiring visitors to exercise their best judgment. If there is scum, a paint-like surface or the water is bright green, avoid all water contact and keep pets away.

Hidden History: Sac and Fox orphan ensures record of tribes’ life in Osage County

Julia Goodell, right, and her adopted daughter Fannie Baker both made their marks on the Sac and Fox tribes’ history in Osage County.

By Wendi Bevitt

Prior to their removal to Kansas around 1845, the Sac (or Sauk) and Fox tribes were located in Iowa. Most often they are mentioned together, but had originally been two distinct groups.

During the 1700s, French attacks on the Foxes (the Fox Wars of 1712 to 1733) in the Great Lakes Region caused the two tribes to join forces and form a close alliance that helped to affect unification.

The Sac and Fox reservation in Kansas was 435,200 acres located at the headwaters of the Osage River, the first agency being in Franklin County. In 1859, the agency was moved into Osage County, at Quenemo, with Perry Fuller (former employer of Frank James) as agent. The agency also employed an interpreter, John Goodell, to assist in government negotiations with the tribe.

John Goodell was of European descent and raised in New York. He became familiar with the language and customs of the Indians, and served as an interpreter for the government in both Iowa and Kansas.

In 1840, Goodell married Julia Mitchell. Julia was a member of the Sac and Fox tribes and was a survivor of the Black Hawk War. This war was an attempt by Sauk leader Black Hawk to lead the Sauk and associated tribes to resettle lands in Illinois that had been ceded by the tribes in an 1804 treaty. Finding a place to call home that was both acceptable to the tribe and the government was something that would plague the tribe continuously, and translating during these negotiations was the main responsibility for John Goodell.

John and Julia Goodell’s home at the Quenemo agency was an asylum for orphans, the sick, and needy. They adopted twins Fannie and Isaac Baker, children of Indian trader Isaac Baker and his Fox wife, who died after their birth. Mr. Baker pursued the fur trade, and eventually became a prominent banker in St. Louis, Mo.

In 1859, the Sac and Fox tribe paid for Fannie and a handful of other young people, including the daughter of the Indian agent, to attend Baker University. Baker University was the first college in Kansas territory having opened in 1858. Perry Fuller, the Sac and Fox Agency representative, was also living in Baldwin City at the time.

Mr. and Mrs. Swarts named as Mr. and Mrs. Osage City 2017

Mr. and Mrs. Osage City 2017 are Richard and Jeanette Swarts, (driven in a Corvette convertible by the Oglebys).

Richard and Jeanette Swarts represented Osage City in the  2017 Osage County Fair Parade as Mr. and Mrs. Osage City. They said they feel very honored and appreciative and would like to thank the Chamber of Commerce for selecting them.

Richard has been a life-long resident of Osage City. After high school graduation, he attended Flint Hills Vo-Tech, studying automotive. He has held a variety of employment including DuPont, Buzz’s Automotive, co-owner of Buzz’s Automotive, and Kansas Department of Transportation. Upon retiring from KDOT, he now assists his brother-in-law with his farming operation.

Jeanette grew up in Burlingame and moved to Osage City after they got married. After high school graduation, she received a business-secretarial degree from Emporia State University. Retirement in 2012 concluded a combination 40 years of service with Hallmark Cards and Kansas State High School Activities Association. Jeanette has enjoyed supporting the community, where she has served on the school board for 12 years, recreation commission for 12 years, and treasurer for the Osage City Country Club. Jeanette continues and is enjoying the opportunity to serve Osage City as executive director for the Osage City Chamber of Commerce and Third Ward representative on the Osage City Council.

The couple is always looking for ways to improve and support the community. On June 28, they celebrated their 48th wedding anniversary. Together, Richard and Jeanette’s hobbies include attending car shows and traveling. They are active with the Twin Lakes Cruisers Car Group and organizing the annual Cruis’n and Cook’n Car Show. They enjoy spending time at The Lodge, in Branson, Mo., and attending Kansas State Football games as season ticket holders. They also enjoy spending time with their two sons, Shawn, Baker, Mont, and Ty and Jill, Shawnee, Kan., five grandchildren, three step-grandchildren, and four step-great grandchildren.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas