Search Results for: lakes

Blue-green algae warnings lifted for all Osage County lakes

TOPEKA – All lakes in Osage County that were previously under watch or warning status for blue-green algae have been cleared by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment and Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism.

The two agencies lifted the warning and watch for Melvern Outlet Pond and Carbondale West Lake this week; they were the two remaining lakes in Osage County under the algae alert.

In northeast Kansas, the agencies have issued a public health warning for Frazier Lake in Grant County for the upcoming weekend and week, and South Lake Park, Johnson County, remains under a watch status.

Several lakes in Osage County experienced blue-green algae blooms over the summer, including Carbondale West Lake, Melvern Outlet Pond, Melvern Outlet Swim Pond, Overbrook City Lake, Overbrook City Kids Pond, and Pomona Lake.

If a lake is under a public health warning for blue-green algae, activities such as boating and fishing may be safe. However, direct contact with water, such as wading, skiing and swimming, is strongly discouraged for people, pets and livestock.

Two area lakes remain under health warning for blue-green algae

TOPEKA, Kan. – All except two Osage County lakes that were previously under a blue-green algae warning or watch have now been released from the public health advisories. Carbondale West Lake and Melvern Outlet Pond remain under a warning status for the algae, with activities at those lakes still restricted.

Toward the end of the summer, several area lakes were under either warning or watch status for blue-green algae. The warning or watch status has now been lifted for Melvern Outlet Swim Pond, Overbrook City Lake, Overbrook City Kids Pond, and Pomona Lake.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment with the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism issue the public health warnings for Kansas lakes.

If a lake is under a public health warning for blue-green algae, activities such as boating and fishing may be safe. However, direct contact with water, such as wading, skiing and swimming, is strongly discouraged for people, pets and livestock.

Lakes under a warning are not closed. If swim beaches are closed, it will be specifically noted. Drinking water and showers at parks are safe and not affected by algae blooms. Boating and fishing are safe on lakes under a warning but contact with the water should be avoided. Hands should also be washed with clean water after handling fish taken from an affected lake.

Overbrook City Lake no longer under algae warning; enjoy fall at local lakes

Summer might be over, but with fair weather, Overbrook City Lake and Friesen Fishing Lake continue to offer residents and visitors peaceful spots for reflection, walking or fishing. Benches installed in 2015 have been placed on the fishing dock, with one honoring the late Max Friesen for his many years of service. Photo thanks to city of Overbrook.

The city of Overbrook was notified that results of testing for blue-green algae from the week of Sept. 11, 2017, has allowed the Overbrook City Lake to be downgraded from warning to watch status by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

The lake was put under warning for blue green algae the week of Sept. 1. The lake was not closed, but officials recommended avoiding contact with the water, and rinsing any fish caught with clean water.

Despite the lake’s former-warning status, the city’s lakes were still open for fishing and other activities. According to Overbrook City Clerk Jim Koger, 100 children participated in the Steve Cross Memorial Children’s Fishing Derby Saturday at the Children’s Fishing Pond, at Jones Park. He noted that due to great support from the community and national sponsors, each of the children were given a new fishing rod and reel.

Two other lakes in Osage County remain under warning for blue-green algae, Melvern Outlet River Pond and Melvern Outlet Swim Pond.

If a lake is under a public health warning for blue-green algae, activities such as boating and fishing may be safe. However, direct contact with water, such as wading, skiing and swimming, is strongly discouraged for people, pets and livestock.

Five Kansas lakes under public health warning due to blue-green algae

TOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment, in conjunction with the Kansas Department of Wildlife Parks and Tourism, has issued a public health warning for five lakes due to a harmful algal bloom.

If a lake is under a public health warning for blue-green algae, activities such as boating and fishing may be safe. However, direct contact with water, such as wading, skiing and swimming, is strongly discouraged for people, pets and livestock. The lakes currently under a watch or warning status are:

  • Warning: Keith Sebelius Reservoir, Norton County
  • Warning: Kirwin Lake, Phillips County
  • Warning: Marion County Lake, Marion County
  • Warning: Marion Reservoir, Marion County
  • Warning: Sam’s Pond, Syracuse, Hamilton County
  • Watch: Webster Lake, Rooks County

Lakes under a warning are not closed. Marinas, lakeside businesses and park camping facilities are open for business. If swim beaches are closed, it will be specifically noted. Drinking water and showers at parks are safe and not affected by algae blooms. Boating and fishing are safe on lakes under a warning, but contact with the water should be avoided. It is safe to eat fish caught during a harmful blue-green algae outbreak, as long as the fish is rinsed with clean water. Only the fillet portion should be consumed, and all other parts should be discarded. Hands should also be washed with clean water after handling fish taken from an affected lake. Zoned lakes may have portions fully open for all recreation even if other portions are under a warning.

Zebra mussels continue infestation of Kansas lakes

Two more lakes found to have invasive mollusks

050814-zebraTOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism has confirmed the presence of invasive zebra mussels in Wellington Lake in Sumner County earlier this month. Wellington city staff discovered the invasive, sharp-shelled mollusks as they replaced buoy lines. KDWPT staff subsequently found well-established populations of zebra mussels of various ages in the old and new parts of the lake.

In May, KDWPT confirmed the presence of invasive zebra mussels in Paola City Lake, or Lake Miola, in Miami County. On May 23, an angler snagged an old fishing rod near the boat ramp with live adult zebra mussels attached and reported it to the local KDWPT game warden. KDWPT aquatic nuisance species staff subsequently found more zebra mussels of various ages in several parts of the lake. The population appears to be well-established.

Wellington Lake covers approximately 675 surface acres, and is managed by the city of Wellington. Lake Miola covers approximately 220 acres and is managed by the city of Paola.

KDWPT manages both lakes’ fisheries as part of the department’s Community Fisheries Assistance Program (CFAP).

Both lakes offer outdoor activities such as boating, skiing, swimming, fishing, camping and hiking. Jessica Howell, KDWPT aquatic nuisance species coordinator, reminds lake visitors that everyone using the lakes plays a key role in stemming the spread of mussels to uninfested lakes.

“This situation shows how important it is for boaters, anglers, swimmers and skiers to be aware of aquatic nuisance species (ANS) and to take precautions to prevent their spread,” Howell said.  

Anglers encouraged to use caution on ice covered lakes

Warmer temperatures will begin causing weak spots on frozen waters 

PRATT – A recent cold-spell had many Kansas lakes covered in thick ice, creating ideal conditions for ice fishing, but even with very cold temperatures, ice anglers must be vigilant. Now that temperatures are warming, extreme caution must be used in avoiding weak spots on lakes and reservoirs.

If you have an itch to drop a line this winter, keep these following common-sense ice safety rules in mind:

Spring rains fill local ponds and lakes

As pond-filling rains ended Tuesday afternoon, Dragoon Creek at U.S. 75 looked more like the Dragoon River, with rapid flow pouring into Pomona Lake. Rain gauges showed 2 to 4 inches fell across Osage County Monday and Tuesday. With another inch or so added overnight Wednesday, Pomona Lake’s elevation was 977.62 feet Thursday; normal pool elevation is 974.

Outdoors: Frozen lakes require extreme caution

PRATT – After nighttime temperatures in the single-digits and daytime highs in the teens and twenties, most Kansas water bodies are covered with a sheet of ice. While beautiful and perhaps alluring to anglers and explorers, a frozen lake can be deadly and deserves respect and caution.

Corps urges waterfowl hunters to be safe on area lakes

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – The Kansas City District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers urges hunters to be safe and take precautions this winter when hunting at any of the district’s 18 lakes throughout Missouri, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska.

Most waterfowl hunters do not think of themselves as “boaters.” The boat is just a mode of transportation to reach their favorite hunting spot; as a consequence, they do not consider the safety precautions that are important for a safe and enjoyable hunting trip. Packing boats beyond capacity with decoys, guns, dogs, gear, and their buddies creates a very dangerous safety hazard. 

Corps to reopen area lakes’ operations

Pomona, Melvern lakes’ federal facilities to be open by Friday

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Kansas City District is reopening operations following the shutdown of the federal government for lack of fiscal 2014 funding legislation which began on October 1. This includes visitor centers, boat ramps and similar facilities that are typically open this time of year at all 18 of the district’s lake projects. The following camping areas will be reopened by Friday, October 18:

Pomona Lake, Kan. – Outlet, 110 Mile, Cedar, and Wolf Creek Group Camp; Melvern Lake, Kan. – Outlet and Sundance parks;

Federal recreation areas closed at Melvern and Pomona lakes

KANSAS CITY – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Kansas City District has closed USACE-operated campgrounds and day-use parks due to the shutdown of the federal government for lack of fiscal 2014 funding legislation. The closure includes federal facilities at Melvern and Pomona lakes.

Affected recreation areas will remain closed until after the shutdown is lifted. This includes all visitor facilities, campgrounds, boat ramps and similar facilities at all 18 lake projects in the Kansas City District.

Zebra mussels found in two more Kansas lakes

Glen Elder Reservoir and Lake Wabaunsee have the invasive species

TOPEKA – The Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism has confirmed the presence of zebra mussels in Glen Elder Reservoir (Waconda Lake), in Mitchell County, and Lake Wabaunsee, in Wabaunsee County. Zebra mussels are bean-sized mollusks with striped, sharp-edged, two-part shells. Twenty-one Kansas lakes have now been confirmed to have zebra mussels.

“These latest discoveries show how important it is for the public to be aware of the dangers of aquatic nuisance species (ANS) and to take precautions to prevent their spread,” said Jessica Howell, KDWPT aquatic nuisance species coordinator.

USACE urges safety when hunting in public areas

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – The Kansas City District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers urges all hunters to be safe this fall when hunting at the 18 lakes throughout Missouri, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska and the Missouri River.

Whether your hunting season started Labor Day weekend or you are still awaiting your first opportunity to venture out, hunter safety is a must. First, before you put on your hunting gear here are five safety musts to ensure many return visits to that favorite spot:

Follow firearms safety practices

Treat every gun as if it were loaded. Never point a gun at anything you’re not willing to shoot, Ever! Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot. Be sure of your target and what is beyond it.

Know your surroundings

Learn the location of the property boundaries, homes, building, trails, and other recreation areas where you are hunting. Know where to hunt and know where other people and places are located.

Wear safety equipment

State laws require specific safety equipment or attire to be wore while hunting. It is also important to remember to wear your life jacket while hunting from a boat or a safety harness while hunting high up in a tree.

Respect other public land users

Public land allows for multiple different uses. Hikers, bikers, and wildlife watchers have just as much privilege to use public land as hunters. Respect their use too.

Non-hunters near hunting areas

Non-hunters and their pets should wear bright, noticeable clothing and make enough noise for adjacent hunters to know your presence. If you want to avoid hunting altogether many public use areas around the lake are restricted to hunting.

Jeanne Louise Bond, 81, Overbrook: June 23, 1937 – Oct. 28, 2018

OVERBROOK, Kan. – Jeanne Louise (Kingery) Bond, 81, went home to the Lord on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018, surrounded by her family. Jeanne was born on June 23, 1937, near Lone Star, Kan., to Everett William Kingery and Mary Elizabeth (Sanders) Kingery.

Jeanne was married to Roland Arthur Bond on Oct. 23, 1953. Jeanne and Roland brought seven children into this world, Michael, Steven, Pamela, Cynthia, Stanley, Jeffrey and Brenda. Jeanne loved her family greatly and enjoyed loving on 15 grandchildren, 23 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.

Jeanne attended a one-room school near Globe until the eighth grade and then attended Overbrook High School, Overbrook, Kan. Jeanne and Bus were high school sweethearts. She started working at O’Bryhim’s Grocery Store, in Overbrook, in 1967. She worked there in various positions, but for most of those years, she worked behind the meat counter with her loving smile until she retired in 2011.

Frontier Extension District youth to celebrate National 4-H Week, Oct. 7-13

OSAGE COUNTY, Kan. – For the 76th consecutive year, millions of youth, parents, volunteers and alumni across the country will celebrate National 4-H Week Oct. 7-13, 2018. This year’s theme, Inspire Kids to Do, is a campaign that will give kids more opportunities to do, empowering them with the skills they need to succeed in life and career.

Throughout National 4-H Week, Osage County 4-H members will showcase the many ways 4-H inspires kids to do through hands-on learning experiences, and highlight the remarkable 4-H youth in our community who work each day to make a positive impact on those around them.

4-H was founded on the belief that when kids are empowered to pursue their passions and chart their own course, their unique skills grow and take shape, helping them to become true leaders in their lives, careers and communities.

Adam Burnett, active at work and on the boccia court

Adam Burnett, Osage City Chamber of Commerce member and employee of Resource Center for Independent Living, is not only busy at work, he also is active participating in the sport of boccia. He has been very successful in recent competitions at the national level.

Burnett, originally of Melvern and now Osage City, has worked at RCIL, in Osage City, since 2002. He was introduced to the Paralympic sport of boccia in 2016. Boccia is a throwing sport that tests an athlete’s coordination, accuracy, concentration, and ability to strategize. It can be played in a team or pair or individual competition.

What started out for Burnett as playing “just for fun” became more serious following a third place finish at the U.S. national tournament in 2016. He was then selected to Team USA in 2017 and represented the United States in two international tournaments that year, first in Montreal, Quebec, and then in Cali, Colombia.

Burnett won gold at the US National Tournament in 2017, but he is most proud of being a member of the first BC4 pair to ever win an international match for the United States, when he and his partner defeated Argentina last summer in Colombia.

“It’s really exciting and an honor to wear the Team USA gear and represent my local communities when we travel and compete,” Burnett said.

Leitha Farwell, 82, Lyndon: May 13, 1936 – Sept. 7, 2018

LYNDON, Kan. – Leitha Farwell, 82, passed away on Friday, Sept. 7, 2018, at Osage Nursing Center, Osage City, Kan. She was born on May 13, 1936, in Peoria, Ill., the daughter of Wilbur and Clara Tunis Light.

Leitha grew up in Dunlap, Ill., and lived in Peoria, Ill., and Topeka and Lyndon, Kan. The last four years she has wintered in Venice, Fla., and summered in Lyndon.

Leitha had worked for UPS in Ottawa for 24 years in the accounting department; she then worked for Neosho County Community College in Ottawa. She was a member of the Lakeside Lutheran Church, in Florida, and the Lutheran Women’s Guild.

USACE encourages lake visitors to be safe on the water during Labor Day holiday

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District, which manages 18 lakes throughout Missouri, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska, is encouraging everyone to not be a statistic this Labor Day weekend and to wear a life jacket while in, on, or around the water.

“Since March of this year, eight water-related fatalities have occurred at our lakes,” said Kyle Ruona, Kansas City District public safety program manager. “None of these individuals were wearing a life jacket.”

The Kansas City District urges visitors to be prepared, understand the importance of water safety and to be alert to expect the unexpected.

“Whether kayaking, swimming or fishing, we want all our visitors to exercise good judgment when on or around the water,” said Angelia Lentz, Tuttle Creek Lake natural resource specialist. “We encourage everyone to wear a life jacket and to remember that boating and alcohol are a bad combination. We want all our visitors to have a great time, but the most important thing is their safety.”

Blue-green algae closes Michigan Valley swim beach at Pomona Lake

VASSAR, Kan. – The U.S Army Corps of Engineers at Pomona Lake has announced the existence of a blue-green algae bloom at the Michigan Valley swim beach at Pomona Lake.

According to project operations manager Scott Rice, yesterday, Aug. 16, 2018, what appeared to be blue-green algae was noticed in the beach area and around the dam.

“Preliminary tests show the presence of blue green algae,” Rice said. “The beach will be tested Monday by KDHE but for safety reasons the beach has been closed.”

According to an announcement from the Corps, swimming will not be allowed at the Michigan Valley Swim Beach, and all wading and contact with algae is highly discouraged. Visitors are encouraged to use the beach located in Pomona State Park on the south side of the lake.

The Corps reported the most recent tests showed the presence of the toxin microcystin, but noted levels can increase or decrease on a daily basis. Hot and sunny weather conditions combined with high nutrient levels create ideal conditions for harmful algae bloom growth.

Pet owners need to be particularly mindful of the presence of blue-green algae. Dogs are highly susceptible to algae toxins and frequently ingest concentrated toxins from shoreline areas. Pets that swim in or drink water affected by a harmful algal bloom or those that eat dried algae along the shore, may become seriously ill.

Boat ramps and lake activities are not affected at this time. Marinas, lakeside businesses and park camping facilities are open for business. Drinking water and showers at parks are safe and not affected by algae blooms.

All invited to Osage City Library’s community health fair

The Osage City Public Library is hosting a community health fair for all ages 1:30-2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2018. The health fair will feature numerous local organizations, agencies and businesses that encourage everyone to be healthy in mind, spirit and body. Everyone is invited to stop by the library at 515 Main St., Osage City, for the health fair, or call the library at 785-528-3727 for more information.

The following organizations, agencies and businesses have signed up to be at the health fair:

Osage County sizzles in drought with scant rainfall, high temperatures

With Osage County and portions of Kansas under a state-issued drought emergency declaration, the federal government has authorized emergency grazing of some of the state’s Conservation Reserve Program acres. The governor had earlier authorized use of state lakes for water sources for counties designated in a drought emergency.

U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency announced today additional authorization of Conservation Reserve Program acres for emergency grazing for 44 counties in Kansas, including Osage County.

Earlier in the month, Kansas Governor Jeff Colyer issued a drought declaration for the state, which included all 105 counties in drought emergency, warning or watch status; 50 counties are in emergency status.

The declaration allows individuals and communities in counties in emergency stage to be eligible for use of water from certain state fishing lakes and some federal reservoirs. Anyone needing water from the designated lakes must contact Kansas Water Office for a water supply request prior to any withdrawals.

Likewise, eligible producers interested in emergency grazing of CRP must request approval through their local FSA before grazing eligible acreage, and obtain a modified conservation plan from the NRCS that includes grazing provisions.

The governor’s declaration is in effect until rescinded by executive order; emergency grazing of CRP is authorized through Sept. 30, 2018.

Officials cited livestock water shortages, low flows at some reservoirs, and outlook of persistent drought as reasons for the statewide drought declaration. Some areas of Kansas are behind more than 15 inches in moisture for the year, and outlooks indicate continuing above normal temperatures and below normal precipitation.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas