A Cowboy’s Faith: Voice reveals true expression

buchmanhead“That cowboy sure has a face for radio.”

“That cowboy sure doesn’t have a voice to announce rodeos.”

No argument to either, and we’ve heard both evaluations said honestly without offense intended.

Thoughts of being on the radio crossed our imagination for decades as certain cowboy music jocks appealed our fancy.

Upon becoming a radio station worker, opportunity to voice commercials has arisen.

Right, wrong, or coincidental, comments of listener recognition have sometimes been noted.

Being on the radio is harder for a cowboy than it might seem. There are all of those recording gadgets that must be pushed, pulled, coordinated before words go across airways.

It’s been a cooperative effort of coworkers to record, then produce our sounds with appropriate background in set time. They’ve been patient, thankfully.

Yet, intrusion on schedules became apparent that it was better to have professionals do entire production. We’d write the words, and they’d do what the audience hears.

Still, those paying for on-air promotions generally like to hear what the message sounds like before having it go live. Sample advertising commercials require time, further demanding an already busy staff.

To ease that burden, several personal attempts to “learn the board,” and produce our own “specs” have failed, due to inert technical incapability.

After just a couple “lessons,” despite congenial assistance, we’ve shaken our head, pouted in disgust, threw up our hands, dropped the ball and quit trying to learn.

The need has remained, and even become more important to being helpful to everyone involved. So again, we’re determined to learn the trade.

Most appreciative that a four decade recognized veteran of live airwaves, also with vast production experience, has consented to teaching this time. That’s despite warnings of our naiveté when it comes to computers and like stuff.

Admittedly, learning hasn’t been easy for an old set-in-ways cowboy, but there’s been limited success. Fortunately, listeners only hear the voice and can’t see who it is.

Likewise, while our unique, often readily identifiable voice, is not what evaluators consider appealing for Western-action-calling (announcing), that job’s been ours on a couple hundred occasions since the first time in ’69.

Reminds us of: Solomon 2:14: “Let me see your face. Let me hear your voice.” Because Solomon 5:14: “His rugged face shines with brightness, while His voice, warm and reassuring.”


030615-franksmug2Frank J. Buchman is a lifelong rancher from Alta Vista, a lifetime newspaper writer, syndicated national ag writer and a radio marketing consultant. He writes a weekly column to share A Cowboy’s Faith.


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