A Cowboy’s Faith: ‘New’ road provides ‘access’ – Osage County Online | Osage County News

A Cowboy’s Faith: ‘New’ road provides ‘access’

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“They finally built a personal ‘super-highway’ so the ranchers and neighbor lady down the road weren’t home locked.”

It was after utmost aggravation with an occasional negative remark.

By law, the Department of Transportation is obligated. “Upon signed agreement to change highway logistics, they must provide access for homeowners.”

More than one assured without question; that is the rule. “Call the Highway Department and the construction crew and then file charges if they don’t build a roadway,” counselors advised.

There have been “Road Closed” signs for several months situated to be driven through to the ranch house. Then, the signs were “locked” across the pavement to stop traffic completely.

In a rage-of-sorts, the sand-bagged ‘orders’ were moved aside several times so the ranch family could get through. Construction crew moved them back, evidently thinking the 45-degree-sloped, 10-foot-wide roadside could be used for travel.

That was done a couple of time, but with a horse trailer behind the pickup it was very dangerous. No accidents occurred, but another call was made to the construction foreman.

Later instead of sooner, a cobbled quarter-mile dirt path was bulldozed from the driveway to the paved highway north.

It was at least a way out until the prayed-for, very-much-needed summer rain came in abundance. That makeshift road became impassible by even the most powerful four-wheel-drive pickup.

Work still had to be done. Two tons of ground feed must be unloaded from the elevator truck that had driven 25 miles to get there. Cattle were ready for shipment to market, and there was a day job at the sale barn. No way to get any of the essential tasks accomplished.

Finally, Cody, the palomino gelding, was ridden to the paved intersection, where the ranch manager with trailer-loaded cattle waited. Remainder of the cattle would have to be sold at a later time. Feed shipment must be taken back, or driver sit there until only God knows when.

Riding to the corner horseback was definitely easier than riding 25 miles to the day job.

Unknown what the situation would be upon return, low-and-behold a rough graveled path was there. Four-wheel-drive is required but it does provide an in-and-out.

Shaking head in disbelief is all one can do, and make do with what there is.

Reminded of Nehemiah 4-7: “Closed roads made the homeowners very angry.”

By law, the Department of Transportation is obligated. “Upon signed agreement to change highway logistics, they must provide access for homeowners.” Frank Buchman photo.


Frank J. Buchman is a lifelong rancher from Alta Vista, a lifetime newspaper writer, syndicated national ag writer and a marketing consultant. He writes a weekly column to share A Cowboy’s Faith.


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