A Cowboy’s Faith: Cowboy Code of Conduct, Roy Rogers – Osage County Online | Osage County News

A Cowboy’s Faith: Cowboy Code of Conduct, Roy Rogers

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.The West has long been associated with honor, bravery, and the pioneer spirit of heading into the unknown to make a better life. Today, the West continues to celebrate that “cowboy spirit” of adventure and entrepreneurial pursuits.

However, it seems that to call someone a “cowboy,” in some circles, is an insult. Yet, cowboys’ principled behavior became codes of conduct that many of America’s heroes promoted for viewers of early days Western movies and television shows.

Second in a four-part series, the inspirational philosophies of movie cowboys, unknown to many today, are being shared.

Roy Rogers, nicknamed the King of the Cowboys, was an American singer, actor, and rodeo performer.

Riding his Palomino stallion Trigger, Roy appeared in more than 100 motion pictures, as well as his self-titled radio and television programs. In most of them, Roy entertained with his wife, Dale Evans, riding her buckskin horse, Buttermilk.

There were Roy Rogers action figures, cowboy adventure novels, play-sets, comic book series, and a variety of marketing successes. Roy Rogers was second only to Walt Disney in the number of items featuring his name.

Highlight of childhood memories was seeing Roy Rogers in person when he had his family show at the Mid-America Fair in Topeka.

Of course, Roy rode and did tricks with Trigger, shot plates thrown into the air, and sang cowboy songs with his wife and some of their children.

Glenn Randall, who trained most cowboy movie horses, was in attendance with six matching palomino horses that performed at liberty.

Years later, Roy Rogers was seen in person again at the American Royal in Kansas City. He borrowed a palomino horse to ride around the arena for his introduction before entertaining with his songs including “Happy Trails.”

Roy Rogers Riders Club Rules

  1. Be neat and clean.
  2. Be courteous and polite.
  3. Always obey your parents.
  4. Protect the weak and help them.
  5. Be brave but never take chances.
  6. Study hard and learn all you can.
  7. Be kind to animals and care for them.
  8. Eat all your food and never waste any.
  9. Love God and go to Sunday school regularly.
  10. Always respect our flag and country.

Reminded of First Peter 2:17, “Show proper respect to everyone: Love the brotherhood of believers, fear God, honor the King.”

Editor’s note: This article is one in a four-part series shared by Frank Buchman on the philosophies of four inspirational early day movie cowboys, unknown to many today.


Frank J. Buchman is a lifelong rancher from Alta Vista, a lifetime newspaper writer, syndicated national ag writer and a marketing consultant. He writes a weekly column to share A Cowboy’s Faith.

 

 

 


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