Category Archives: Record

Osage County Jail Log, March 29 – April 4, 2020

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Osage County Jail Log, March 23 – March 25, 2020

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, March 9 – March 13, 2020

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, March 9 to March 13, 2020. Please note that due to changes to Osage County District Court procedures and public access, this report might not be available or could be limited in its scope temporarily.

Osage County Jail Log, March 14 – March 19, 2020

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Osage County: Stay at home!

County health officer issues stay at home order

All of Osage County will be under a stay at home order effective at 12:01 a.m. Saturday, March 28, 2020, to help control the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19).

Osage County public health officer Jackie Patterson, RN, issued the public notice Thursday, noting, “Despite recent enactment of Public Health Orders (schools, bars and restaurants), lack of available metrics to monitor the effect of these measures and the potential dire consequences of delay led the Public Health Officer to conclude that further delay could lead to excess mortality.

“Early implementation of this strategy is even more important in the context of limited testing capacity. With full community cooperation, this proactive public health order can minimize the impact of COVID-19 on our Osage County community.”

The notice directs individuals to stay at home to slow the rate of community spread of COVID-19 through intensified social distancing.

“It is estimated that each COVID-19 positive patient could infect between 2.6 to 4 other people. Social distancing strategies are effective when implemented early enough – ideally within two weeks of the first case and are key to flattening the epidemic curve to prevent overwhelming our local health care system’s ability to care for the proportion of residents who develop severe symptoms,” the notice says.

The order urges everyone to stay at home except to perform essential services or to engage in essential activities, defined as tasks or activities that are essential to health and safety, and to practice social distancing when out.

“People at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and people who are sick are urged to stay in their residence except as necessary to seek medical care,” the order warns.

The order outlines which businesses are considered essential and the proactive measures they must take to ensure compliance with social distancing requirements, where possible.

The order also prohibits public gatherings of more than 10 people, and empowers local law enforcement officers to enforce the order.

Osage County had previously declared a public health emergency and had closed all restaurants and bars except for carryout service, effective March 23.

U.S. Supreme Court affirms Kahler’s capital murder conviction

James Kraig Kahler is led out of the Osage County Courthouse to the county jail after his sentencing, Oct. 10, 2011. File photo.

TOPEKA, Kan. – The U.S. Supreme Court today affirmed the capital murder conviction of James Kraig Kahler, who murdered four members of his family in Osage County, Kan., in November 2009.

A press release from Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt’s office announced the high court’s ruling, which found the Kansas statute for handling evidence of a criminal defendant’s mental disease or defect does not violate the due process of law guaranteed by the 14th Amendment. Put another way, the Kansas law governing the “insanity” defense is constitutional.

“Contrary to Kahler’s view, Kansas takes account of mental health at both trial and sentencing,” Justice Elena Kagan wrote in the majority opinion. “It has just not adopted the particular insanity defense Kahler would like. That choice is for Kansas to make – and, if it wishes, to remake and remake again as the future unfolds.”

In the 1990s, Kansas adopted a revised form of insanity defense, which is now referred to as the “mental disease or defect” defense. Under Kansas law, a criminal defendant may not be held culpable if he lacks the cognitive capacity to know that his actions violate the law. But, unlike in the majority of states, a criminal defendant in Kansas may be held culpable if he does not understand that his actions, although against the law, are also morally wrong. Kansas is one of five states that does not allow acquittals of defendants who do not recognize that their actions are morally wrong.

The Kansas Supreme Court in February 2018 upheld the Kansas approach. The U.S. Supreme Court, in a 6-3 opinion today, affirmed the Kansas Supreme Court’s ruling.

Kahler was convicted of capital murder by an Osage County jury in August 2011 for the 2009 murders of his wife, Karen Kahler, their two teenage daughters, Emily and Lauren, and Karen Kahler’s grandmother, Dorothy Wight. The shootings occurred at Wight’s Burlingame, Kan., home.

Kahler was sentenced to death by Chief District Court Judge Phillip Fromme in October 2011.

Order of the Board of Health/Public Health Officer Prohibiting or Restricting Public Gatherings

Editor’s note: The following order was issued by the Osage County Public Health Officer, Saturday, March 21, 2020. It is published here as a public service.

Order of the Board of Health/Public Health Officer
Prohibiting or Restricting Public Gatherings
(Issued under the Authority Granted by K.S.A. 65-119(a))

March 21, 2020

The Board of Health/Public Health Officer hereby issues the following prohibitions or restrictions regarding certain businesses and/or gatherings in Osage County:

  1. This order shall apply to all restaurants, dining facilities, bars, taverns, community centers, fitness centers, and clubs.
    These locations are hereby ordered closed to the public effective at 12:01 a.m. on Monday, March 23, 2020, until further notice.
    Any such establishment may continue to provide carryout, drive-through and delivery food and beverage services.
    Any establishment that provides any kind of public self-service food or beverage such as buffets, salad bars, coffee shops, and convenience stores may remain open, but must close the self-serve portions of their business. This order does not allow for there to be any dine-in seating whatsoever at the establishments listed in the order.
  2. All large public gatherings of people in the County are prohibited. Large public gatherings are those with more than ten (10) people in attendance or anticipated to attend, both indoor and outdoor, except for governmental functions and deemed essential industries as defined by U.S. Homeland Security.
  3. Religious services, funerals, and memorial services (as defined by the Internal Revenue Service) are authorized to have more than ten (10) people in attendance, but must ensure appropriate social distancing of at least 6 feet between co-habiting members.
  4. In all areas, establishments must follow the guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), federal, state, and local public health officials for social distancing and infection control measures.
  5. The order may be supplanted or modified as required for the effective and efficient management and control of the Coronavirus epidemic in Osage County by further order or direction of the Osage County Board of Public Health or by the Osage County Local Health Officer.

This order will remain in effect until further notice from the Board of Health or Health Officer.  Any questions regarding this notice may be directed to the Osage County Public Health Department at (785) 828-3117, or to the Osage County COVID-19 Hotline at (785) 219-1680.

Jackie Patterson, RN, BSN
Osage County Public Health Officer

March 21, 2020

KCC issues emergency order suspending utility disconnects until April 15

Citing emergency declarations by Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly and the World Health Organization, the Kansas Corporation Commission used its emergency powers to issue an order suspending utility disconnects for nonpayment until April 15. The action, taken in a special meeting March 16, 2020, will offer relief to those experiencing potential hardship from the COVID-19 virus.

The directive covers all electrical, natural gas, water and telecommunications utilities under the KCC’s jurisdiction, several of which have already voluntarily suspended disconnects. The KCC also encouraged those utilities not under its jurisdiction to enact similar practices.

“COVID-19 is an unprecedented challenge, and Kansans may face unexpected or unusual financial difficulties,” Kelly said. “No one should have to worry about losing utility service needed to ensure public safety, which is why I am bringing every resource to bear to make sure everyone stays safe and healthy. Kansans step up in a time of need, and this is more proof.”

The commission may elect to extend the suspension order in a subsequent order if conditions warrant.

Kansas open meeting laws remain in effect amid COVID-19 pandemic

TOPEKA, Kan. – Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt is offering guidance to state and local governments on how to comply with the Kansas Open Meetings Act if in-person meetings of any public body are replaced with remote meetings by telephone or other communications equipment amid the developing federal, state and local response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

“Nothing in state law allows for the suspension of the KOMA or its open government requirements,” Schmidt said. “In fact, in times like these, it’s more important than ever to ensure government remains open and accessible so Kansans are able to observe and understand how responses to an emergency situation are being developed.”

Kansas law requires meetings of public bodies be “open to the public.” Ordinarily, that requirement is satisfied by public bodies, such as city or county governing bodies, gathering in a room where members of the public are allowed to enter and observe during the meeting. However, in response to the “social distancing” directives from federal and state authorities that are designed to slow the spread of the virus, some governing bodies are considering replacing in-person meetings with electronic meetings by telephone or other remote communication method to avoid gathering in person.

Schmidt pointed out that although remote meetings of public bodies by telephone or otherwise are allowed, those meetings still must remain “open to the public” by allowing the public to observe or hear the meeting. Due to the unprecedented and evolving nature of the current situation, Schmidt said his office is currently drafting a temporary regulation to provide more-specific guidance on how public bodies may comply with KOMA while the state of emergency related to the virus outbreak remains in effect.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, March 2 – March 6, 2020

This information compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, March 2 to March 6, 2020.

Osage County Jail Log, March 8 – March 13, 2020

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, Feb. 24 – Feb. 28, 2020

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, Feb. 24 to Feb. 28, 2020.

Osage County Jail Log, March 3 – March 7, 2020

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, Feb. 17 – Feb. 21, 2020

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, Feb. 17 to Feb. 21, 2020.

Osage County Jail Log, Feb. 23 – Feb. 28, 2020

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Osage County Jail Log, Feb. 18 – Feb. 22, 2020

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, Feb. 10 – Feb. 14, 2020

The following information compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, Feb. 10 to Feb. 14, 2020.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, Feb. 3 – Feb. 7, 2020

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, Feb. 3 to Feb. 7, 2020.

Osage County Jail Log, Feb. 10 – Feb. 15, 2020

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, Jan. 27 – Jan. 31, 2020

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, Jan. 27 to Jan. 31, 2020.

Osage County Jail Log, Feb. 4 – Feb. 8, 2020

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas