Poster winners spread fire prevention messages

The 2017 Osage County Fire District No. 2 fire prevention poster winners were Angelica Ruiz-Pineda, Kaylee Theel, Grady Tincher, Kenzie Bellinger, Sophia Brabb, Jada Ruiz, Brynna Burd, Kalen Conner, More »

Caution on the road: Deer-vehicle crashes increase in fall

Mating season and the quest for more secure habitat have deer on the move this time of year, increasing the chances of vehicle collisions. Typically, the greatest number of More »

Student art show adds autumn colors to Lyndon Fall Fest

Hailey Houser’s fall apples painting won best of show. The Lyndon student art show has become a traditional feature of the community’s annual Fall Fest, highlighting the talents of More »

All aboard: Embark on historical journey at Osage City Santa Fe Depot

Unique open air waiting porch projects from the southwest elevation of the depot. By Paul Schmidt The unique train depot in Osage City, Kan., was constructed 1911-1912, typical of More »

All aboard: Embark on historical journey at Osage City Santa Fe Depot

Unique open air waiting porch projects from the southwest elevation of the depot.

By Paul Schmidt

The unique train depot in Osage City, Kan., was constructed 1911-1912, typical of Santa Fe depots built in the Spanish Mission style during the time period. It was built by Stivers Harvey contractors, of Kansas City, for about $13,000.

The depot is beautifully detailed in dark red brick against light creme concrete walls to recall stucco. The parapet features original Santa Fe Railroad identification complete with cross and lettering.

The Osage City Santa Fe Depot is located at 508 Market St., where it was built parallel to the now Burlington Northern Santa Fe tracks that dissect the town from southwest to northeast.

It is one of two such Spanish Mission style Santa Fe depots left, with the other one located in central Texas at Coleman.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Whistle provides notice, warning

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Five working days a week, the town whistle blows at noon and again at 6 o’clock.”

City slickers are alarmed by the loud shrill questioning: “What’s that?”

Not too many communities regularly sound announcement it’s “dinnertime” and when to officially “stop working.”

Fortunately, the hometown these days continues the practice, although there is occasional malfunction.

Few realize the whistle absence, but there’s typical small town folk uprising when the buzzer continues screeching for extended time.

Rural town visitors always comment about the twice-a-day whistles, yet sirens are common place in the state’s capital city. There are also loud chimes that city churches regularly toll, certain days, specific times.

Some country churches still faithfully, thankfully, continue ringing the church bell, or semblance thereof, at Sunday starting time.

Even when there are real bells with truly beautiful melody, they don’t ring when electricity’s off or timer’s caput. That’s not a problem when the deacon, pastor or church board member pulls the bell rope.

Mid-last-century, Mr. Fisher, the Garfield Grade School principal, came out of the front door every school day morning at 8:15. With copper-colored bell in hand, he’d select one of the students for ringing the bell “school’s ready to start.”

OCPR Update: October tumbles in as gymnastics classes start jumping

OCPR-logo-redOsage City Parks and Recreation is laying down the mats for the upcoming gymnastics classes, which will keep gymnasts jumping and tumbling in October and November. Here are the details:

National 4-H Week: Stylin’ 4-Hers show off fashion sense, sewing abilities

Participants in the 4-H Style Revue held at the 2017 Osage County Fair, front from left, Amanda Malone, North Osage; Allie Kneisler, Lyndon Leaders; Chloe Cannon, North Osage; Brealyn McNally, Melvern Jr. Highline; Cole Thompson, Willing Workers; Soloman Shultz, Clover Wrangler, back, Josie Thompson, Willing Workers; Jerra Butterfield, Willing Workers; Trista Anderson, Willing Workers; Lily Shultz, Clover Wrangler; Keira Shultz, Clover Wrangler; Addyson Easter, Vassar Blue Ribbon; Isaac Shultz, Clover Wrangler.

Participants in the local 4-H clothing project hosted a public fashion revue July 1, 2017, at the Osage County Fair.

The clothing project is made up of two areas: clothing construction, in which the 4-H member sew their own clothes, and clothing buymanship, in which the 4-H member purchases an outfit.  With a theme of “4-H Clover Review”, 15 4-H members participated.

Grand and reserve champions were: Senior boys buymanship, grand, Isaac Shultz, Clover Wrangler, reserve, Isaac Shultz, Clover Wrangler; junior boys buymanship – grand, Solomon Shultz, Clover Wrangler, reserve,  Brody Thompson, Clover Wrangler; senior girls buymanship, grand, Lily Shultz, Clover Wrangler, reserve, Josie Thompson; junior girls buymanship, grand, Addyson Easter, Vasser Blue Ribbon, reserve, Jerra Butterfield, Willing Workers; construction, grand, Jerra Butterfield, Willing Workers, reserve, Chloe Cannon, North Osage.

With fall here, Lyndon plans to celebrate with day of fun

Fall has officially arrived and the Lyndon community is inviting everyone to celebrate during the annual Lyndon Fall Fest on Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017.

The Osage County Courthouse lawn is the center of festivities, and Lyndon Pride and the city of Lyndon are the hosts to the event that includes a craft and vendor fair and a multitude of fun games for kids of all ages. In addition, the celebration features a touch-a-truck opportunity, student art show, silent auction of all kinds of unique items, classic fair food, and the ever popular coins in the corn with cash prizes. All proceeds benefit Lyndon Pride.

The Saturday celebration gets underway at 9 a.m. Oct. 7, and will wind down about 3 p.m. The whole family is invited to enjoy the fall day in Lyndon, Kan.

Here is the schedule from Lyndon Pride:

Iona Lorraine Smiley, 91, Osage City: Oct. 3, 2017 – Aug. 8, 1926

OSAGE CITY, Kan. – Iona Lorraine Smiley, 91, of Osage City, Kan., passed away on Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, at Osage Nursing Center, Osage City. Iona Lorraine Evarts was born on Aug. 8, 1926, in Dodge City, Kan., the daughter of Ross Ray and Lillie Arline (Bryan) Evarts. She graduated from McPherson High School.

Lorraine was joined in married to James Clifford Smiley, on Jan. 25, 1947, in Topeka, Kan.

She had worked for Kansas Neurological Institute for 27 years. Lorraine was a member of the Countryside Baptist Church, Osage City, TOPS, Jersey Creek Ladies Club, and was very active in the church and community.

Osage City student wins statewide award for Put the Brakes on Fatalities poster

An Osage City student artist has been named as a statewide winner in the Put the Brakes on Fatalities Day statewide contests.

Austin Lamb, of Osage City, Nora Ackermann, Andover, and Alyson Welch, Overland Park, were named as statewide winners in the poster contest. Each student was first selected as a regional winner and will receive a bicycle and a helmet donated by Safe Kids Kansas at presentations at their schools.

A total of 1,048 Kansas kids ages 5 to 13 participated in the poster contest. As statewide winners in their age categories, they will also receive a Kindle Fire tablet from the Kansas Turnpike Authority, a $50 gift card from the Petroleum Marketers and Convenience Store Association of Kansas, a $50 gift card from Walmart and movie passes from AAA Kansas.

Winners of the two statewide contests were announced as part of the national safety campaign Put the Brakes on Fatalities Day.

Multi-county nutrition program announces new executive director

Angie Logan

Long time social worker Angie Logan assumed the helm of Mid-America Nutrition Program as executive director on Sept. 20, 2017. Logan said she hopes to find ways to enrich the multi- county Meals on Wheels program by securing additional funding and working to create intergenerational relationships between the elders and school age youth.

“I am excited to join our program because I believe that we are the eyes and the ears of the homebound elderly thereby preventing premature admissions to nursing homes and undue emergency room visits,” Logan said.

She has worked in Kansas as a licensed master’s level social worker since 1999 and has worked in a variety of diverse settings. Throughout her career, she has engaged in policy, direct practice, research, teaching, grant writing and fundraising initiatives.

National 4-H Week: Former 4-Her honored as Osage County’s 4-H Alumni

Presenting the 4-H Alumni Award to Devin Ramsey, holding award, are, from left, Savannah Bean, Morgan Woodbury, Maddy Montgomery, Devin Ramsey, Casten Wirth, and Dalton Hook.

Osage County 4-H has recognized former 4-Her Devin Ramsey as the 4-H Alumni of the Year.

Devin, who was nominated by Vassar Blue Ribbon 4-H Club, was a member of the Carbondale Rustler 4-H Club for 12 years. Devin’s favorite project was the dog project, and since she has been out of 4-H she has been a dog project leader for Osage County, and helps the superintendent at the fairs.

The 4-H Alumni award is given as a way to thank former 4-Hers for giving back to their home county’s 4-H clubs. Ramsey was recognized for the award during the 2016 Osage County 4-H’s achievement night.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, Sept. 25 – Sept. 29, 2017

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse Sept. 25 through Sept. 29, 2017.

Maxine Karnes, 96, Overbrook: March 24, 1921 – Oct. 4, 2017

OVERBROOK, Kan. – Maxine Karnes, 96, passed away on Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017, at the Stormont-Vail Hospital, Topeka, Kan. She was born on March 24, 1921, on the family farm east of Overbrook, Kan., the daughter of John and Bertha Howard Desque.

Maxine had lived all of her life around Overbrook until 1991, when she moved into town. She attended Enterprise School until fifth grade, then graduated from eighth grade at the Lickskillet School, and graduated from Overbrook High School in 1939. She farmed with her husband, Wilson, driving grain trucks and feeding hay crews through the years. She was a member of the Overbrook United Methodist Church and the United Methodist Women, was an organizer and member of the Busy Bee Club, and was a member of the Thimble C​lub and Canasta Club. Maxine loved dancing, cooking, baking, quilting and embroidery work.

National 4-H Week: Club reviews exhibits during walking tour of county fair

North Osage 4-H Club on its annual tour of exhibits, from left: Wylie Young, Brock Robert, Alex Strother, Amanda Malone, Lynnea Nelson, John Sand, Gabe Butel, Dylon Harris, Gage Cannon and Chloe Cannon.

The North Osage 4-H Club held its annual club tour during the Overbrook Osage County Fair, Aug. 12, 2017. The tour, which consists of walking through the Coffman building and livestock barns, gives club members an opportunity to share and talk about their projects exhibited during the fair.

National 4-H Week: 4-H clubs rely on a little help from their friends

Awarding a Friend of the 4-H Award to Robyn Williams, right, are local 4-H members, from left, Garret Croucher, Dalton Hook, Morgan Woodbury, Gracie Croucher and Tracy Wilk.

4-H members and clubs are supported throughout the year by numerous individuals and businesses. Without such support, the 4-H program would cease to continue helping young people make a difference in the communities, learn life skills and develop leadership skills. To recognize the individuals who provide support, the organization annually gives out Friend of 4-H awards. Three people from Osage County were honored by Frontier Extension District 4-H clubs as Friends of 4-H, Chris Reno, Kelly Vandruff, and Robyn Williams.

Reno was nominated by Vassar Blue Ribbon 4-H Club, due to his graciousness in allowing the club to use his store front window for the past year and half. This has given the club the opportunity to promote Osage County 4-H and the club’s projects.

Vandruff was nominated by Burlingame 4-H Club, because she is always willing to help out with the club’s activities and community service projects. She also has offered fun and new ideas for the club to try.

Williams, of Edward Jones Investments, was nominated by Willing Workers 4-H Club. She has provided a generous cash award to the top two showmen in both age divisions of the Osage County Fair round robin showmanship contest since 2002. Whenever possible, Williams has attended the contest to personally present the award to the winners.

Attorney general accepts public comment on St. Francis Hospital sale

TOPEKA, Kan. – The attorney general’s office will accept public comments starting this week on the proposed sale of St. Francis Hospital, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt has announced. Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth Health System Inc. has announced plans to sell the hospital to Topeka Health System LLC, a joint venture between the University of Kansas Hospital Authority and Ardent Health Partners LLC.

The public comment period is the next step in the attorney general’s review of the terms of the proposed sale. Under Kansas law, the attorney general reviews conversions of not-for-profit entities, such as St. Francis, to for-profit entities to ensure compliance with state laws protecting charitable assets. The public comment period is intended to allow members of the public and affected consumers to provide information to the attorney general on the proposed sale and the impact on health care services in northeast Kansas – whether favorable, unfavorable, or neutral.

“Since SCL announced its intent first to close, and later to sell, St. Francis, we have been engaged in a thorough review of the proposed transaction to ensure compliance with Kansas law,” Schmidt said. “I anticipate the public comment period to be the final step necessary for our review, and I encourage anyone with information about the proposed sale and asset conversion to file comments and bring that information to our attention. The purpose is to ensure our review is complete and does not miss any pertinent issues.”

National 4-H Week: Hook family continues support for 4-H through generations

Osage County’s 4-H Family of the Year, the Don and Jenise Hook family, front from left, Melissa Bean, Charleigh Bean, Jenise Hook, Savannah Bean, Savannah Bean, back, Tyler Bean, Dalton Hook, Don Hook, and Adam Bean.

Don and Jenise Hook and their family were named as Osage County’s 4-H Family of the Year for 2017, continuing a rich tradition of 4-H in their family. Don’s and Jenise’s mothers were active members of 4-H in the 1950s, they both were active in 4-H as youth, and their four children, Adam, Tyler, Jamie, and Dalton, also continued in 4-H. The Hooks now have two daughters-in-law, one who was also a 4-H member.

Vassar Blue Ribbon 4-H Club recognized the family’s continuous support to the local club, Frontier Extension District and the Kansas 4-H organization.

It was less than 10 years ago that the Vassar Blue Ribbon membership was surviving on a mere handful of members. The Hooks maintained a positive presence and leadership, kept their children engaged, and plugged forward. Today the club stands strong with 25-plus members and a slew of supportive parents. Fast forward to today, you will see the Hooks hosting meetings, leading committees, assisting families, and consistently supporting the greater 4-H community.

The Hook and Bean family’s combined years of 4-H participation totals 62 years. The Hooks’ granddaughter, Savannah Bean, represents the family’s fourth generation to participate in 4-H.

National 4-H Week: Frontier Extension District youth to celebrate

For the 75th consecutive year, millions of youth, parents, volunteers and alumni across the country will be celebrating National 4-H Week during the first full week of October. Frontier Extension District 4-H will leverage National 4-H Week this year by showcasing the incredible experiences that 4-H offers young people, and will highlight the remarkable 4-H youth in our community who work each day to make a positive impact on those around them.

Be looking for the 4-H members in your community this week.  They will be highlighting some of their 4-H projects and experience this week.

“The 4-H program has shaped me into the person I am today,” said Jessica Flory, Frontier Extension 4-H program assistant, “teaching me vital life skills that have helped me achieve success in my adult life.”

4-H alumni around the country are always the first to acknowledge the significant positive impact 4-H had on them as young people. The opportunities and experiences that 4-H provides youth empowers them to become true leaders. Research has shown that young people in 4-H are almost four times as likely to contribute to their communities, and are twice as likely to engage in science, technology, engineering and math programs in their free time.

In Frontier Extension District, more than 604 youth and 162 volunteers from the community are involved in 4‑H.

Runners, bikers to ‘Rush the Rails’ Saturday

FLINT HILLS NATURE TRAIL, Kan. – Where locomotives once chugged across the eastern-Kansas prairie, hikers, joggers and bicyclists can trek the same route today along the currently completed 95 miles of the Flint Hills Nature Trail. On Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017, the first Rush the Rails event will fill the trail with riders and bikers, with a planned relay race, bike rides and festivities along the completed portions of trail.

Starting at Osawatomie in the east to Council Grove in the west, four and eight-person relay teams will set out at 7:30 a.m. from John Brown Park, in Osawatomie, and run the entire 96-mile route (a short detour adds an extra mile to the 95-mile trail). Bikers can choose from three distances: the full 96 miles starting at Osawatomie (7 a.m.), 54 miles from Pomona State Park (8:30 a.m.), or 25 from Admire (10:30 a.m.), with all running and cycling events ending in Council Grove.

Back in Time: Whirlwind of land acquisition floods Marais des Cygnes Valley

Shown in a June 1975 photo of Melvern Lake, its then-new 12-story control tower is already a landmark on the water.

About 1972, Corps of Engineers attorneys obtained easement for the Melvern Reservoir in Osage County, Kan. The details involved in acquiring an easement for land to be flooded by the Melvern Reservoir in Osage County, Kan., is explained by a Corps of Engineers attorney, Ben Bonner, left, to sellers of the easement, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Evertson, of Topeka, Kan. The easement permitted flooding of 180 acres of the 350-acre tract owned by the couple. Exemplifying the speed of the process, the Evertsons received their check 10 days after signing the agreement.

Osage County Jail Log, Sept. 24 – 30, 2017

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Harveyville church invites all to offer praise in the pumpkin patch

The Harveyville United Methodist Church is planning two events and is inviting everyone to share in faith and fellowship.

The church will have its annual Praise in the Pumpkin Patch on Sunday, Oct. 15, at the Country Bumpkin Pumpkin Patch, 11668 K-31 Hwy, Harveyville. Service starts at 11 a.m., followed by a pot luck and wiener roast at noon. Hot dogs, buns, condiments and drinks will be provided. Bring a lawn chair and a covered dish and enjoy a praise and worship service in the great outdoors.

A month from now, the church will host a BBQ pulled pork fund raising dinner 5:30-7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 4. They will serve pulled pork, cheesy potatoes, baked beans, salad, dessert and a drink for the suggested donation of $8 for adults, $5 per child 6 to 12, and children 5 and under eat free.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Lost are always found

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.Somebody said it’s called “mazeophobia.” That’s a big word for fear of being lost.

Probably not actually a fright of such so much as it sure is easy to not know where one is.

It’s happened a jillion times in the big chain store parking lot, several times at a dozen airports and a handful of major cities.

As bad as or perhaps worse than getting lost in a metropolis is in a multi-section Flint Hills pasture. When there’s native prairie as far as can be seen everywhere, it’s difficult to know which direction is which. Fortunately, ranch managers have that keen sense, while bewildered wannabees sometimes ride in circles.

Worse case urban scenario was in a Boston, Mass., rented car trying to find the horse show grounds. That same coin-throw-toll bridge was driven over several times before making the correct turn.

Another nightmare memory was trying to find the Seattle, Wash., airport for a 3 o’clock morning flight. Repeated calls to the show manager kept responding: “It’s right there.” No, it wasn’t, but fortunately figured out where it was, just before the stewardess closed the airplane door.

Can’t help but reflect, too, on 1968 when lost in the state fair parking lot. Had ridden with neighbors to the best groomed boy contest, and was meeting at 4 o’clock to come home. Obviously lost was found.

Semblances occurred twice in recent weeks trying to locate horseshow arenas in small northeast Kansas communities. Maps, the internet and show bills all provide directions, but they’re vague or incomplete.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas