Train, pickup crash results in no injury

OSAGE CITY, Kan. – The Osage County Sheriff’s Office has reported that a driver of a pickup truck escaped injury after his vehicle was struck by a train this More »

Poisonings and medicine mishaps can happen anywhere, anytime

March 17-23 is National Poison Prevention Week TOPEKA, Kan. – Nearly 60 percent of the human poison exposures reported to the Kansas Poison Control Center involved medications or pharmaceuticals. More »

Corps braces for more levee breaches as Missouri River flood heads downstream

KANSAS CITY, MO – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Kansas City District declared a flood emergency along the Missouri River last week due to concerns resulting from heavy More »

Severe Weather Awareness Week: Prepare your family for severe weather

Safe Kids Kansas offers safety tips for severe weather TOPEKA, Kan. – While the threat of severe weather in Kansas is year-round, March 3-9, 2019, is Severe Weather Awareness Week More »

A Cowboy’s Faith: Rains bring in spring

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Get ’em out of the mud.”

The statement has many connotations but been heard more and more as moisture continued coming down.

“It’s a tale of woes,” whoever’s relating their difficulty in caring for cattle in this “most unusual year,” comment added.

Certainly cattle in confinement even with highly coordinated drainage systems, there’s no relief from the mud.

Major cattle feeders report reduced gains from combination – sloppy pens, mud packed cattle backs, record cold, then too warm.

Problems expand for cow-calf operators with first calf heavy springer heifers behind the barn.

Even those with high maternal instinct can’t find a dry spot to birth. Drop the newborn in the wet mud, sometimes even a waterhole, because no alternative.

A certain mud reprieve comes when ground freezes overnight, but that’s less often, and the icy cold creates its own havoc.

Calving in grassland is generally satisfactory for mature mommas with more knowledge of caring for young, but not this year. Finding dry grass for birthing is difficult, more so with every additional sprinkle, let alone shower or downpour.

Hazards of water filled draws, fast running creeks, and ponds are always a haunt for newborns. Now, there’ve been more reports of finding babies in flooding streams, on ponds frozen tight, or stranded alive.

Jesse Hall Sr., 97, Quenemo: Feb. 13, 1922 – March 20, 2019

QUENEMO, Kan. – Jesse Hall Sr., 97, passed away on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, in Ottawa, Kan. He was born on Feb. 13, 1922, in Woodlake, Neb., the son of Thomas and Mary Jessep Hall.

Jesse attended school at Boatman School in Nemaha County, Neb., and lived in Falls City, Neb. He lived in Hiawatha, Kan., before moving to Quenemo, Kan. Jesse farmed for several years and then worked unloading coal cars in Nebraska. He worked at Monarch Egg Plant, in Hiawatha, until retiring in 1984.

Yes, healthy eating is possible on a tight budget

“Healthy food is too expensive!” This is a common response from many folks who view “healthy foods” (such as fruits, vegetables, lean meat) as too pricey to afford, but is it really? Eating healthy may seem out of your reach (or a stretch of your paycheck) but with some advanced planning and a little know-how, it is possible.

While deals on processed foods like soda, boxed meals, chips, sugary cereal and fruit snacks may seem to be your answer on how to spend your food dollars, eating well on a budget is easier than you think. Besides, a lifetime of buying cheap, highly processed and not-so-healthy foods will likely backfire on your health. Developing a chronic health condition such as type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure is often related to poor food choices. In the long run, you will end up spending far more money on treating your chronic health condition (doctor visits, medications, hospitalizations) than you would have if you chose healthy foods more often.

The thing to know is that healthy eating is not simply purchasing high dollar foods. There are ways to enjoy a variety of high-quality, nutritious, and affordable foods that fit into your food budget, and reach your health goals.

Train, pickup crash results in no injury

OSAGE CITY, Kan. – The Osage County Sheriff’s Office has reported that a driver of a pickup truck escaped injury after his vehicle was struck by a train this morning north of Osage City.

The sheriff’s report said that at 9:29 a.m. March 21, 2019, a northbound Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad train struck an eastbound 1999 Ford F250 pickup truck pulling an empty livestock trailer, driven by Aaron Payne, 26, Scranton.

The report said Payne failed to yield at a cross buck marked intersection at 201st Street and Auburn Road, in Osage County, about three miles north of Osage City.

Neither Payne nor the train crew was injured, the sheriff reported. The train’s engineer was Sean McBreen and conductor was Dave Kleuskens.

The accident is being investigated by the Osage County Sheriff’s Office. Assistance was by provided on the scene by Osage County EMS, Osage County Fire District No. 6 and the Kansas Highway Patrol.

Poisonings and medicine mishaps can happen anywhere, anytime

March 17-23 is National Poison Prevention Week

TOPEKA, Kan. – Nearly 60 percent of the human poison exposures reported to the Kansas Poison Control Center involved medications or pharmaceuticals. While most over-the-counter and prescription medicines can be helpful when taken as directed, when not taken properly, medicines can be harmful, and in some cases deadly. Medication errors can occur at any age, which is why during the March 17-23 National Poison Prevention Week, Safe Kids Kansas asks everyone to be aware of proper medicine safety.

“Any medication, prescription or over-the-counter, can be poisonous when used in the wrong way, by the wrong person, or in the wrong amount,” said Cherie Sage, Safe Kids Kansas state director. “Be sure to read labels carefully and follow directions. If you have questions, contact your doctor, pharmacist or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222 for information.”

It’s important for everyone to save the Poison Help line in your phone, said Stefanie Baines, education coordinator for the Poison Control Center at the University of Kansas Health System. “Calling 1-800-222-1222 is the fastest way to get an answer from an expert. It is far better than going online to find help, and you can call any time with questions, not just during emergencies,” Baines said.

By taking a few precautions, you can help keep your loved ones and yourself safe from poison emergencies.

Opal Morine Ireland, 88, Overbrook: Nov. 6, 1930 – March 15, 2019

OVERBROOK, Kan. – Opal Morine Ireland, 88, of Overbrook, Kan., passed away Friday, March 15, 2019, at Brookside Manor, Overbrook. She was born Nov. 6, 1930, at Dearborn, Mo., the daughter of William Albert Richey and Laura Catherine (Mauzey) Richey.

Morine grew up in the Kansas City area attending Wyandotte High School, Kansas City, Kan.

On Feb. 3, 1951, Morine was united in marriage to Robert Wendell Ireland, in Kansas City, Mo. Bob and Morine were an inseparable pair. Their life journey together sent them all over the country, living in Hawaii, California, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas. They settled in Overbrook in 1990, living in the area for the rest of their lives.

Osage County Jail Log, March 11 – March 16, 2019

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Wayne Graika, 62, Ottawa: March 3, 1957 – March 16, 2019

OTTAWA, Kan. – Wayne Graika, 62, passed away on Saturday, March 16, 2019, at Midland Hospice House, Topeka, Kan. He was born on March 3, 1957, in Hettinger, N.D., the son of John and Margie Onefeather Graika.

Wayne had lived in Anchorage, Alaska, Arizona and Colorado; he had lived in the Ottawa, Kan., community for the last several years. He worked in construction and roofing.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, March 4 – March 8, 2019

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, March 4 through March 8, 2019.

U.S. Supreme Court to hear Kahler death penalty appeal

The Kansas Attorney General’s Office reported today that the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear the appeal of James Kraig Kahler. An Osage County jury convicted Kahler of killing his two teenage daughters, his wife, and her grandmother at Burlingame, Kan., in 2009, and recommended he be sentenced to death.

The Kansas Supreme Court affirmed Kahler’s conviction and death sentence in February 2018. Today the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear Kahler’s appeal from the Kansas Supreme Court decision.

In his appeal to the Kansas Supreme Court, Kahler raised 10 issues, including allegations of misconduct by the prosecutor and trial judge, challenges to the instructions given to the jury, and an argument the death penalty is unconstitutional when applied to a person who has a severe mental illness at the time he or she committed a crime.

Help Wanted: Osage City accepting applications for Sanitation Department

The City of Osage City is accepting applications for a Sanitation Department Refuse Collector. Duties include manual work associated with trash collection. This position involves both light and very heavy labor. Salary will be commensurate with individuals qualifications and experience. The City of Osage City is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Applications may be made at or mailed to Osage City Hall, 201 South 5th St., P.O. Box 250, Osage City, Kansas, 66523, by 5:00 p.m. on March 22, 2019. The application can be found on www.osagecity.com Job Postings, and emailed to City Clerk at [email protected].

Corps braces for more levee breaches as Missouri River flood heads downstream

KANSAS CITY, MO – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Kansas City District declared a flood emergency along the Missouri River last week due to concerns resulting from heavy rainfall, saturated and snow-covered soils across the basin, and increased releases from upstream dams. The resulting effects pushed river stages into minor, moderate, and major flood stage at various locations along the Missouri River from Rulo, Neb., to St. Louis, Mo.

The Kansas City District Emergency Operations Center is currently operating at a level 2 partial activation, during which the Corps collects, evaluates, interprets and disseminates flooding information both internally and externally. The Corps continues to closely monitor the situation and reiterates that during this flood event that the public remain vigilant and aware of their surroundings.

The Corps is currently providing direct and technical assistance to local levee owners and operators and has dispatched liaison teams to work with both the Kansas Department of Emergency Management and the Missouri State Emergency Management Agency. The assistance includes providing sandbags and sandbag filling machines.

Four non-federal levees have breached in the Kansas City District’s area of responsibility. River stages are currently rebounding in and around Rulo, Neb., and St. Joseph, Mo. The water levels are dangerously high and present great risk to people, property and levee systems.

The flood crest will move downstream, expected to impact non-federal levees systems more than federal levees along the Missouri River.

Help Wanted: Osage City seeks applicants for Water, Gas and Wastewater Operator

The City of Osage City is taking applications for a Water, Gas and Wastewater Operator, to work in the Water, Wastewater, and Natural Gas Departments of the City. Job responsibilities will include treatment plant operation of both water and wastewater, also working in distribution and collection systems. High School diploma or GED required as well as a valid Kansas driver’s license. The City of Osage City is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes and applications by 5:00 p.m. March 22, 2019, to City of Osage City, 201 S. 5th St., P.O. Box 250, Osage City, Kansas 66523 or visit www.osagecity.com, Job Postings. Applications and/or resumes can be emailed to City Clerk at [email protected].

A Cowboy’s Faith: Go ahead do it

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Can’t is over in the ditch.”

That was first grade teacher Mrs. Gibson’s response, 62 years ago; when classmates said something couldn’t be done.

“Don’t say it can’t be done; just find another way to get accomplished what’s needed.”

That was coworker Sean Carter at the recent Farm Profit Seminar when somebody said there was no more display space.

While not always completely accurate in either scenario, both statements encourage efforts for finding solutions when quitting is easier.

Looking around the ranch front, office situations, community needs, and seemingly unconquerable projects everywhere, “can’t” is a common analysis.

An excuse of one kind or another can be determined for nearly every project that requires extra effort, coordination and cooperation.

In grade school long ago, it was easy for any kid to readily contend: “I can’t do that.” Whether printing their name, erasing the chalk board or adding one and one, the teacher proved everyone could do it.

Finding places for late arriving sponsors at last week’s seminar was as simple; crowd together, share areas, use smaller tables. Can’t was sure not the solution when all originally planned sponsorship areas were filled.

Of course, getting everything accomplished that the majority first insist can’t be done isn’t always nearly that easy. Still all things considered, generally, “where there’s a will, there’s a way,” quoting a common longtime philosophy.

That’ll require a bit of give and take from everybody involved. Certain ones are not going to get exactly their method. It must be united effort for best results.

Mary Louise Hoy, 68, Overbrook: Aug. 6, 1950 – March 14, 2019

OVERBROOK, Kan. – Mary Louise Hoy, 68, of Overbrook, Kan., passed away March 14, 2019, at her home. She was born Aug. 6, 1950, in Twin Mound, Kan., the daughter of Floyd Trout and Mary Alice (Schirmer) Trout.

Mary was a lifelong Osage County resident, graduating from Overbrook High School with the class of 1969.

On February 21, 1969, she was united in marriage to Lloyd Hoy Jr., at her parents’ home in Twin Mound. They just celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.

Britta Sue Whitaker, 59, Topeka: Dec. 13, 1959 – March 11, 2019

TOPEKA, Kan. – Britta Sue (Browning) Whitaker, 59, passed away on Monday, March 11, 2019, at her home in Topeka, Kan. She was born on Dec. 13, 1959, in Topeka, the daughter of Richard and Marla Schultz Browning.

Britta grew up in Topeka, where she graduated from Washburn Rural High School in 1977. She had also lived in Bremerton, Washington, Kansas City and Gardner, Kan., before moving back to Topeka. Britta had worked in banking for many years and was a trustee officer. She was a member of the Zion Lutheran Church, Vassar, Kan.

Filings in the Osage County Courthouse, Feb. 25 – March 1, 2019

The following information was compiled from records at the Osage County Courthouse, Feb. 25, 2019, through March 1, 2019.

Spring to bring swine showdown to Osage City

OSAGE CITY, Kan. – A spring swine show at Osage City is being planned by local organizers, who recently welcomed a donation from a Baldwin City based farm credit provider. The Osage County Showdown Spring Show is scheduled for May 26, 2019, at the Osage County Fairgrounds, at Osage City. The event will include a one-day swine show and learning opportunities for students, including “Livestock Workdays” during which exhibitors bring their livestock projects and older showman and parents help them to learn more about the animals.

“Providing learning opportunities such as workshops will be a fun way to get more kids involved in animal agriculture, creating advocates for the industry,” said Josie Bosse, who is co-coordinator of the show with Amanda Croucher.

As part of organizing a livestock show, donations are welcomed, including the recent $500 grant gained through Frontier Farm Credit’s Working Here Fund. Osage County Showdown was one of nine organizations to receive Working Here Fund grants in the fourth quarter of 2018.

Former Kansas EMT sentenced to probation for stealing morphine

WICHITA, Kan. – A former emergency medical technician in Jackson County, Kan., was sentenced Tuesday to five years on federal probation for stealing morphine from vials, the U.S. Attorney’s Office has reported.

Colby W. VanWagoner, 33, Mayetta, Kan., pleaded guilty to one count of obtaining a controlled substance by deception and one count of making a false statement during an investigation. One condition of his release is he not engage in any occupation that would give him access to controlled substances without prior approval from his probation officer. He also must complete an approved substance abuse program.

The crimes took place while VanWagoner was working for the Jackson County Emergency Medical Service, in Holton, Kan. In his plea, VanWagoner admitted he tampered with vials of morphine sulfate. He replaced morphine with saline solution and put the vials back into narcotic boxes on ambulances and in office stocks. Tests showed the concentration of morphine in vials that had been tampered with was low as 1 percent or less. The concentration of morphine should have been 100 percent.

Osage County Jail Log, March 3 – March 9, 2019

The following individuals were booked into the Osage County Jail in connection with charges or warrants as listed by the arresting agency.

Officials advise drivers to be cautious on local wet, sloppy roads

Local officials are asking everyone traveling on non-paved roads to slow down and use extreme caution. Non-
paved roads have become hazardous with the recent wet and rainy conditions in the Osage County area. With the wet weather expected to continue for the next couple of days, emergency management officials are asking drivers to please slow down, closely watch road conditions, don’t drive through flooded areas, and avoid non-paved roads whenever possible.

More moderate to heavy rain is expected to continue Tuesday evening and Wednesday.

For more information about this local travel advisory, contact Bryce Romine, Osage County Emergency Management director, at 785-828-3323, or 131 W. 14th St., Lyndon, Kan.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas