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Osage City opens holiday season with annual Christmas on Market Street

KC Wolf helps chorus director, Dr. Clinton Johnson, direct the Osage City School Chorus, which gave an entertaining performance prior to the parade. Chamber photo.

The Osage City Chamber of Commerce has announced the 2022 Christmas on Market Street, the city’s annual Christmas season opener, was a success, with various activities entertaining participants throughout the day and evening of Nov. 12. Christmas on Market Street’s fun included a ping pong drop, food court, lighted parade, quarter bingo, craft show, retail poker, face painting, emergency services showcase, raffle drawing, chili feed, and retail store events.

Parade entries included the Boy Scouts, city police, county law enforcement, fire trucks, Osage County EMS, Twin Lakes Car Club, the KC Wolf,  and around eight floats and three golf carts decorated with lights, horses.

This year’s theme was “Songs Of Christmas.”

Santa poses for Christmas photos with some of his gleeful admirers.

Christmas on Market Parade winners

Floats

  • First place, Willing Workers 4-H Club, $125
  • Second place, Garretts Fireworks, $100
  • Third place, Blackston family, $75
  • Fourth place, A Place Called There Church, $50

Golf Carts/ATVs

  • First place, April Peet, $30
  • Second place, Osage City Public Library, $20
  • Third place, Chris Mullins-Washburn Tech, $10

Retail Poker Run, 63 Participants

  • First place, Shawn McKinney, $20
  • Second place, Sarah Weaver, $15
  • Third place, MacKenzie Curley, $10

Downtown Lighting Ceremony

Carter Burkdoll is ready to flip the switch to turn on Osage City’s downtown holiday lights.

Carter Burkdoll’s name was drawn at the Gingerbread House Making event to turn on the downtown lights prior to the parade.

Chili Cook-Off, 12 Entries

  • First place, Diane Rogala, $50 Chamber Bucks
  • Second place, Kim Thompson, $30 Chamber Bucks
  • Third place, Becky Brewer, $20 Chamber Bucks

Business Window Decorating

  • First place, Osage Hardware, $50
  • Second place, Osage County Senior Center, $40
  • Third place, ECKAN, $30

Jingle Bell 5K Run/Walk

Lisa Bulante won the Best Costume/Sweater, and received a $10 Chamber Buck Certificate.

Adult, first overall, Jeff Lohmeyer (male); Amie Lohmeyer (female). They received Michelob coolers. Youth, first overall, Riley Jay (male); Emory Speece (female). They received Sparkling Ice Water. Both prizes were courtesy of Flint Hills Beverage.

Willing Workers’ nominees Jason and Amy Gilliland honored as Friends of 4-H

Jason and Amy Gilliland, Osage County Friends of 4-H.

By Avery Thielen
Willing Workers Club Reporter

Jason and Amy Gilliland, owners of JAG Trucking, have always been a friend of 4-H. This year they won the Osage County Friend of 4-H Award, announced Oct. 26, 2022, at the Osage County 4-H Achievement Night, held at Lyndon High School.

The Gillilands were recognized for their contributions to local 4-H. Every year he has been involved, Jason has donated his time to prepare the pit for the Osage County Fair demolition derby, and helped at the Overbrook Osage County Fair by trucking in lime screenings. Jason is also one of the main organizers of the Touch-A-Truck event at the Osage County Fair, at Osage City. Jason and Amy, who is a 4-H alumni, donate add-on money of $20 to each 4-H member who sells an animal at the Osage County Livestock Sale, in Osage City.

Because of their help, the Willing Workers 4-H Club nominated them for this award to say thanks for helping our community and 4-H! Congratulations Jason and Amy and JAG Trucking!

Dustin Stucky recognized with 4-H Alumni Award

Dustin Stucky

The 2022 4-H Alumni Award was presented to Dustin Stucky, Osage City High School English teacher. As a former 4-H member, mainly in Saline County, he served two years as a 4-H ambassador, held almost every officer role for his club, and was the county council president while serving on the council. He also served as a 4-H camp counselor and attended two 4-H hiking trips, to Mount Rushmore, and to Philmont Ranch, New Mexico. He won grand champion swine two years, won top in state for team demo at Horse Panorama (team demo involves competitions such as quiz bowl, public speaking, and presentations. He won fourth place in the nation for team demo with his sister, Tiffany.

Today, Dustin helps the community by being the debate and forensics sponsor, and high school play director. He is involved in the Willing Workers 4-H Club, and serves as the rocketry project leader. Congratulations Dustin for winning the 4-H Alumni Award.

Willing Workers members’ achievements win awards

The Willing Workers 4-H Club received numerous awards at the Osage County 4-H Achievement Night, held Oct. 26, 2022, at Lyndon High School.

Several members received achievement awards. Receiving the Clover Pin was Ruby Stucky, Leila Wilcoxson, Reece Wilcoxson, Hadley Bosse, and Claire Newman. Paige Thielen earned an Emerald Pin, Kaiden Bosse earned a Silver Pin, and Lena Stucky earned the Silver Guard Pin. The members who received their First-Year Guard Leadership Pins were Kevin Whitmer and Jaiton Bosse. Many members were recognized as record book winners.

In the junior division, Leila Wilcoxson won entomology; and Claire Newman won foods, pets, photography, plant science, poultry, rabbits and visual arts. In the intermediate division, Reese Wilcoxson won pets and visual arts; and Kevin Whitmer won plant science, poultry and sheep. Kevin Whitmer received the treasurer officer book award; and Brody Thompson received the historian officer book award. Jaiton Bosse and Brody Thompson will be joining the Ambassador Team. Congratulations to all award winners!

Melvern Jr. Highline 4-H Club: Members plan to share Christmas spirit in December

By Bella Reeser, Club Reporter

On Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022, the Melvern Jr. Highline 4-H Club held its monthly club meeting at the Melvern Community Center. At 5:01 p.m., the meeting was called to order by President Braelyn McNally. The club began their meeting with The Pledge of Allegiance and 4-H Pledge, led by Braelyn. Historian Allie Reeser called roll, and members and parents answered with, “What is your favorite food at Thanksgiving Dinner?” There were eight members and five adults present. Allie read the minutes from the last meeting; they were approved as read.

Treasurer Gradey McNally read the treasurer’s report; it was approved as read. Reporter Bella Reeser stated she submitted one article to the newspaper. In historian report, Allie shared “4-H Fun Facts” about how 4-H got its name. In leader’s report, leaders Caleb McNally and Lisa Reeser thanked members for attending Achievement Night and Trunk or Treat. They also reminded members to write thank yous to the Lions Club, and that officer training will be Dec. 22 at Lyndon High School.

In old business, club members voted and approved a new club T-shirt design (Please let Lisa know your sizes as soon as possible). In new business, it was moved and seconded to adopt the residents of the Mays House in Melvern, Christmas carol at homes, and deliver fruit baskets for December’s meeting.

Officer elections were also held: President, Gradey McNally; vice-president, Braelyn McNally; secretary, Allie Reeser; treasurer, Landon Roy; reporter, Bella Reeser; historian, Levi Arb and Harper Melton, council reps, Braelyn McNally and Allie Reeser; song leaders, Khloe Rice and Gentry McNally; and recreation, Nathan Ferris.

For the program, each member shared which project they are looking forward to this upcoming 4-H year. In songs, the club sang “We Will Rock You” by Queen. At 5:39 p.m. the meeting adjourned.

Melvern Jr. Highline’s next club meeting will be 5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 4, 2022, at Melvern Community Center.

Members enjoyed snacks brought by the Roy family and played tag for recreation.

Hidden History: Superior townsite fades away with founder’s Kansas dreams

Superior School, Osage County, Kan. Photo by Wendi Bevitt.

The very first attempt at a settlement in what is now Osage County was called Council City. But Council City had a problem. The settlement company that funded and planned it was disorganized, and no one could quite decide where the best location should be – or even if it should be called Council City! After multiple attempts at establishing a location, in an area that covered nearly half a township between Switzler and Dragoon creeks, principal settlement seemed to find a resting place at approximately where Burlingame is today. At the head of the Council City enterprise in the earliest days was James Winchell.

Winchell had been with the settlement company since its arrival in Kansas in the fall of 1854. Shortly after their arrival, the members of the company each selected their preferred tracts of land. Winchell chose a large, wooded parcel located near the confluence of the two creeks. It was not only beautiful but contained significant advantages for building. He was eager to start organizing the town and became its first postmaster.

But when Philip C. Schuyler arrived in Council City in the spring of 1855, he had his own ideas for Council City. Both Winchell and Schuyler were very driven individuals, and it soon became evident that their ambitions would not be able to be combined.

Winchell abandoned Council City at the Switzler location and instead decided to put the resources available on the southern end of the proposed Council City tract for his own town.

His first attempt would be in 1856 with a town named Fremont in honor of General John C. Fremont. In the spring of that year, Winchell served as a delegate to the first national Republican convention. It was at that convention that Fremont was declared the Republican nominee for the presidency. Winchell’s support for Gen. Fremont prompted him to use that name for his town. However, John C. Fremont did not win the presidency, and likewise his namesake town also lost momentum.

Nominating commission chooses Reynolds as new Coffey County magistrate judge

TOPEKA, Kan. – The 4th Judicial District Nominating Commission has selected Kara Reynolds to fill a magistrate judge position in Coffey County. Reynolds’ new position will be effective on her swearing-in. She currently is the executive director of Coffey County Transportation.

The 4th Judicial District is composed of Anderson, Coffey, Franklin, and Osage counties. The position was among several recently certified after the Kansas Legislature passed legislation to fund them.

To be considered for this position, nominee were required to be a resident of Coffey County while holding office; a graduate of a high school, a secondary school, or the equivalent; and either a lawyer admitted to practice in Kansas or able to pass an examination to become certified within 18 months.

After serving one year in office, the new magistrate judge must stand for a retention vote in the next general election to remain in the position. If retained, the incumbent will serve a four-year term.

Qualifiers represent Osage County at Kansas 4-H State Shotgun Match

From left, Osage County 4-Hers Kiera McNellis, Austin Eichem, and Dylon Harris competed at state sporting clays shoot Oct 9.

Three members of the Osage County shooting sports program participated in the Kansas 4-H State Shotgun Match, Oct. 8-9, 2022. Participants were Kiera McNellis, of the Clover Wranglers 4-H Club, and Dylon Harris and Austin Eichem, both of the North Osage 4-H Club. All three members qualified for the state shoot by shooting and scoring high enough at a regional trap and skeet shoot held in August.

Nearly 200 4-Hers from across the state shot trap and skeet Saturday, Oct. 8, at Ark Valley Gun Club in Sedgwick, Kan., and then many returned to shoot sporting clays the next day at Shady Creek Sporting Clays, in Belle Plaine, Kan.

Eichem placed 29th overall for the weekend in the junior, 10-13-year-old division. McNellis placed 96th in the senior, 14-18-year-old division, for skeet. Harris placed 16th in senior trap, 20th in senior skeet, 12th in senior sporting clays, and 13th overall in the senior division for the weekend.

Following the event, Harris was invited to apply to be a member of the 2023 Kansas Shotgun Team at the National 4-H Shooting Sports Competition, in Grand Island Neb., next summer. Team selection will be announced in November.

Dylon Harris to retire from 4-H archery with 6th-place finish at state match

Harris also qualified and participated in the state 4-H archery match, which was held Sept. 24, at Smoky Valley Shooting Sports facility, Lindsborg, Kan. He competes in the senior, open/compound bow division.  He finished in 6th place overall at the event.

This sixth place finish wrapped up Harris’ 4-H archery career as he prepares to age out of the program.  He joined 4-H in 2011, started the shooting sports project in 2012, and made his first appearance at the state archery match in 2015. Harris finished 5th, 10th, 4th, 4th respectively from 2018-2021 at the state matches, earning an invitation to be part of the Kansas National archery team each year. In 2021, only being able to attend nationals once per discipline, Harris finally accepted the team invite. In June 2022 he was one of four compound archery team members for Kansas who brought home the national championship title with their impressive scores for the week.  Harris placed 9th at the national shoot in the individual scoring.  

Melvern Jr. Highline 4-H Club fall update

By Bella Reeser, Club Reporter

On Sunday, Oct. 2, 2022, the Melvern Jr. Highline 4-H Club held its monthly meeting at the Melvern Community Center; the meeting was called to order by President Braelyn McNally. The club began their meeting with The Pledge of Allegiance and 4-H Pledge, led by Braelyn. Braelyn called roll, and members and parents were to answer with “Would you rather slide down a rainbow or jump on clouds?” There were eight members and five adults present.

Vice-President Gradey McNally read the minutes from the last meeting; they were approved as read. Gradey read the treasurer’s report; it was approved as read. Reporter Bella Reeser stated she submitted one article to the newspaper.

In historian report, Historian Allie Reeser shared “4-H Fun Facts” about the emblem of 4-H.

In leaders’ reports, leaders Caleb McNally and Lisa Reeser reminded club members of Achievement Night Oc. 26, and this week is 4-H Week. There was no old business.

In new business, it was moved and seconded to have a Trunk at the Melvern Trunk or Treat 5-7 p.m. Oct. 31.

It was moved and seconded to order new club shirts; Lisa will inquire for designs and bring it back next month.

In program, MJH members created posters to hang up at the Melvern and Quenemo buildings to promote and advertise 4-H.

In songs, the club sang Happy Birthday to Jennifer Roy.

At 5:24 p.n. it was moved and seconded to adjourn the meeting. The Melvern Jr. Highline’s next club meeting will be 5 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022, at the Melvern Community Center.

Members enjoyed snacks brought by the Reeser family and played at the park for recreation.

Willing Workers 4-H Club starts off new 4-H year willingly working

Sweeping the playground at Osage City Elementary School are Willing Workers, from left, Lelia Wilcoxson, Kassie Thielen, Claire Newman, Lena Stucky, and Paige Thielen. Courtesy photo.

By Avery Thielen
Club Reporter

The Willing Workers 4-H Club jumpstarted its 4-H year by celebrating National 4-H Week and 48 Hours of 4-H, and initiating the officers who will serve in a leadership role this year. The club has always been open to help their community. On Oct. 2, 2022, the Willing Workers 4-H club journeyed out to clean the school playground and paint windows. After asking for ideas for National 4-H week, the club thought that cleaning the Osage City Elementary School playground would be a great way to help the community.

The club used brooms and leaf blowers to clean up mulch, dirt and trash, making the playground look much cleaner. After cleaning, the club went to Market Street to paint windows and glass doors, saying “Join 4-H.”

Willing Workers 4-H Club thanks the businesses that allowed us to paint their windows.

Vote: General Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022

Osage County Election Officer Rhonda Beets has given notice that Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022, will be the general election in Osage County, Kan. Listed in the notice were polling places in each city, township and voting precinct in the county as follows:

  • Agency Precinct – Melvern Community Building
  • Arvonia Precinct – Community Building, Osage City
  • Barclay Precinct – Community Building, Osage City
  • North Burlingame Precinct Schuyler Museum Annex
  • South Burlingame Precinct – Schuyler Museum Annex
  • Dragoon Precinct – Schuyler Museum Annex, Burlingame
  • Elk Precinct – Grace Community Church, Overbrook
  • Fairfax Precinct – Grace Community Church, Overbrook
  • Grant Precinct – Community Building, Osage City
  • Michigan Valley Precinct – Grace Community Church, Overbrook
  • Vassar Precinct – Lyndon Community Center, Lyndon
  • Lincoln Precinct – Melvern Community Center, Melvern
  • Melvern Precinct – Melvern Community Center, Melvern
  • Olivet Precinct – Melvern Community Center, Melvern
  • North Ridgeway Precinct – Elms Community Center, Carbondale
  • South Ridgeway Precinct – Elms Community Center, Carbondale
  • Scranton Precinct- Scranton Community Building
  • Superior Precinct – Community Building, Osage City
  • North Valley Brook Precinct – Lyndon Community Center, Lyndon
  • South Valley Brook Precinct – Lyndon Community Center, Lyndon
  • Osage City First Ward – Community Building, Osage City
  • Osage City Second Ward – Community Building, Osage City
  • Osage City Third Ward – Community Building, Osage City
  • Osage City Fourth Ward – Community Building, Osage City

Osage County’s election notice named the persons nominated for any public office and whose names will appear on the ballot:

Fun-loving Windom cowgirl leads diversified, competitive life

Halloween is a special time for TallyAnn Klitzke who enjoys costuming her horse and herself. Elvis and TallyAnn are dressed here as Minnie and Mickey Mouse. Courtesy photo.

Halloween is generally the time kids want to be all dressed up in scary and fun costumes. Some adults like to get in on the excitement too, and TallyAnn is one of them.

Likely first recognized as a cowgirl, TallyAnn Klitzke is much more. A diversely talented educator, youth counselor, coach, pharmaceutical salesperson, and most gifted artist.

Artistic creativity is partially where costuming for Halloween comes in. TallyAnn combines her energetic art talents with her fondness for everything horses to have fun and a good time.

“It’s been a tradition to design and make Halloween costumes for my horse,” she said. The most recent ones include Minnie and Mickey Mouse, Charlie Brown and Snoopy, and Maleficent Fire-Breathing Dragon.

“Diversified” is likely the only encompassing description for the ambitious woman who’d probably be satisfied with “TallyAnn is a cowgirl.”

Raised in western Kansas, TallyAnn graduated from Quinter High School and then received degrees from Fort Hays State University. She has a bachelor’s in education and a Master of Science in school counseling.

Now making her home on an 80-acre farm near Windom, in McPherson County, TallyAnn is a fulltime pharmaceutical sales representative.

“I have three dogs that greet me with happy tails when I return from work each day. I love them to pieces,” she said. “I also have some loyal beef customers for which I enjoy feeding out black Angus steers for butcher.”

Horses have always been close to her heart. “I’m often accused of being ‘born on a horse,’ however my riding didn’t begin quite that early,” Tally Ann said. “My mother Karen Stewart was raised on a horse ranch being an accomplished rider and competitor. I was seven when I started riding.”

Riding her neighbor’s sorrel stocking-legged, blaze-faced feedlot gelding Ponch, TallyAnn participated in her first horse show. “That was the beginning of riding at Kansas Western Horseman’s Association shows as a child and teenager,” she said.

For her eighth birthday, Tally Ann got her very own horse. “Mom came home on a frigidly night with a great surprise, a tri-colored Paint weanling named Thistledown,” TallyAnn reflected.

After Thistledown, TallyAnn rattled off more than a dozen horses she’s owned and ridden throughout decades. “Stub, Ranger, Booker T, Slammer, Blondie, Jim, Bear, Pride, Flaxxy, Cactus, Elvis, Ace, Wasp, and more,” she counted. “That leads us to where I am today with Presley and Fleetwood. It would be nice to have another horse for visitors to ride.

“Elvis was my super star for years and I was heart-broken when he passed away about a year ago. Ladies and gentlemen Elvis has left the building for the very last time.

“Training my childhood mounts to compete certainly lent a hand to the rider I am today,” she added.

Horses are expensive hobbies and even more so for young cowgirls. “I aways had farm jobs lined up for money to buy winter horse hay,” TallyAnn said.

Highlight of the cowgirl’s college years was being crowned Miss Rodeo Kansas 1996. She swept the competition including Miss Congeniality, public speaking, horsemanship, modeling and more.

TallyAnn finished in the top five at the Miss Rodeo America pageant during the 1997 National Finals Rodeo, in Las Vegas. She placed high in state promotion display, photo album, and speech competitions.

Attending Fort Hays State University, TallyAnn was a member of the rodeo club. “But I did not compete on the rodeo team because I was working every weekend, putting myself through college,” she pointed out. “I was in my 40s when I made my final student loan payment, but the struggle was worth its weight in gold.”

TallyAnn served as art and tech instructor as well as track and cross-country coach at Lyndon and Holcomb school districts.

Parker recognized for innovation and creativity at FSA awards ceremony

Presenting the Jack Kilby Innovation Award to Rachel Parker were Farm Program Division Chief Todd Barrows, left, and FSA State Executive Director Dennis McKinney, right. Courtesy photo.

During a ceremony in September, the Farm Service Agency recognized this year’s Eisenhower Legacy Award winners. Included as an honoree was Osage County’s FSA executive director, Rachel Parker, who was the state winner of the Jack Kilby-Innovation Award.

The Jack Kilby-Innovation Award honors an individual who has made impacting contributions to FSA’s mission and vision with groundbreaking ideas. The employee demonstrates creativity and “out-of-the-box” thinking when faced with challenges. This team member uses creative energy to make the workplace better for the entire team.

The award recognized Parker, Osage County and Coffey County FSA Executive Director, as follows:

“When facing challenges at work, Rachel is a true leader. With a positive attitude, she always looks for enhanced methods to provide innovative processes to both co-workers and producers. She has updated information for CIMS and COC training for easier reference. She goes the extra mile to find, create, and share information that benefits everyone.

Hidden History: Osage County farmer women hated weeds, politics and men

In the 19th century women’s roles in the home and workplace were often limited to household management and family responsibilities. Different factors began to influence a change in expectations. One was the rise in popularity of the women’s suffrage movement, which showed young women they could be considered on equal footing with men in many areas. There was also a shift away from an agrarian society in which young men sought out “easier” jobs in cities. Additionally, technological advances made farm work easier to manage and allowed women to take a larger portions of farming activities. In Osage County, Carrie and Martha James didn’t settle for just that, but became principal farmers on their farm in the northwestern portion of the county.

Carrie and Martha’s parents, Charles and Sarah James, moved to a 200-acre farm northwest of Burlingame in the early 1880s. Charles James started with nothing but his land, his horses, implements, and hard work. When lands in Oklahoma Territory were opened up for white settlers, the family took their chances and participated in the fourth land run, which took place in the north central portion of the state in 1893.

Not every participant was able to obtain a claim, but the James family secured an uncontested one near Alva in Woods County. After the claim was made and improvements began, the land was rented, and the Jameses returned to Osage County. Carrie James eventually took on responsibility for the property, while Martha never went farther than the county seat. Once a year Carrie would go to check on the Oklahoma claim, collect rent, and assure herself that the land was being properly maintained.

Charles died in 1896 and instead of his sons taking over their parents’ farm, Martha, age 30, and Carrie, age 18, immediately jumped in. The sisters began working 100 acres – 40 acres they owned and 60 rented. And they did it with great success.

Advances in farming technology greatly helped women farmers. While cost was prohibitive to small farms, implements like the reaper-binder, improved hay rakes, hay tedders, land roller, and disc harrow made the work go much faster. While the Jameses’ farmhouse may have been plainly furnished, their outbuildings housed all modern machinery with large Clydesdales to pull it.

Willing Workers 4-H Club elects officers for new 4-H year

At the first 4-H meeting of the new 4-H year, held Sept. 14, 2022, the Willing Workers 4-H Club selected new officers. Officers are: President, Jaiton Bosse; vice president, Cole Thompson; secretary, Brody Thompson; treasurer, Kevin Whitmer; reporter, Avery Thielen; historian, Paige Thielen; songs and recreation, Leila Wilcoxson; county council representatives, Kevin Whitmer and Brody Thompson; junior president, Lena Stucky; junior vice president, Kaiden Bosse; junior secretary, Reece Wilcoxson; junior treasurer, Ruby Stucky. Congratulations to all of the Willing Workers officers.

Celebrating National 4-H Week, Oct. 2-8, 2022!

Meet a local 4-Her: Bella Reeser, friend of her animals

My name is Isabella Reeser; this is my fifth year in 4-H and my first year in the sheep project. My sister and I decided this year we would like to try a new project, sheep. I was so excited for this project! Unlike my sister, I have never had the chance to show livestock, so I couldn’t wait! To get us started for our birthdays, our parents and grandparents bought each a ewe and wether lamb.

In late March, our journey began by going to a local farmer’s farm to pick out our lambs. The lambs were kept at our grandparent’s house, and every day my sister and I would go to their house twice a day to feed and water them. Then while my sister and mom were at work, I would practice walking and give them baths.

During this project, I learned how to gradually increase their feed to help work them up to being on full feed, how to clean a sheep pen, how to bathe and shear sheep, how to show sheep properly, and how much work it takes to take care of them at the fair. I loved every step along the way with this project.

Even though I was sad when I had to sell my wether, I am looking forward to breeding my ewe and buying a new wether and showing it and my ewe at next summer’s fairs.

Celebrating National 4-H Week, Oct. 2-8, 2022!

Willing Workers 4-H Club 2022: Looking back on a year of community service

By Avery Thielen
Willing Workers 4-H Club Reporter

Ringing bells, working to help others, front, Kassie Thielen and Clara Thielen, back, Avery Thielen and Paige Thielen.

The Willing Workers 4-H Club loves to help the Osage City community. Last 4-H year the club found many new ways to help the community. During 4-H week members made cookies and gave them to the nursing homes and other medical centers to show appreciation to all medical workers. Around Christmas, members made cookies and went caroling at the Park Place Apartments and other assisted living locations and gave cookies to the residents living there.

In the winter the members volunteered to ring the bell for Salvation Army in front of Jerry’s Thriftway. Every year after Smoke in the Spring, the Willing Workers clean up all the trash left behind. In April, the Willing Workers brought a easter egg hunt back to Osage City. The easter egg hunt was held at the Osage City football field. In preparation for the fair, the club cleaned up the Osage City fairgrounds, and made pies for the Lions Club.

The Willing Workers 4-H Club looks forward to helping the community in new ways again this year.

Meet a local 4-Her: Allie Kneisler, quilter and goat caretaker

My name is Allie Kneisler and I just finished my seventh year of 4-H. I am a member of the Lyndon Leaders 4-H Club and the club treasurer. I am also the treasurer for the 4-H Council. I really enjoy 4-H and have learned a lot in the last seven years.

This year I had a great year. I participated in the fashion review, livestock judging contest and participated in both round robins at the fair.

Our club also participated in a lot of different activities this year. This year I participated in photography, fiber arts, visual arts, woodworking, and buymanship.

I really enjoy making quilts as I like to see how much it changes from fabric to a quilted design by the end. I also like working with the animals and showing them at the fairs. I really like showing my goats at the fair, and plan to show them at the Kansas Junior Livestock Show this year.

I think my favorite things about 4-H are club meetings and spending time with my friends at the fair.

Celebrating National 4-H Week, Oct. 2-8, 2022!

Meet a local 4-Her: Tyler Williams, livestock showman

My name is Tyler Williams. I am a member of the Lyndon Leaders 4-H Club, and this was my fourth year in 4-H. I took three projects to the Osage County fairs this year. They were my pigs, Sunny, Clay, and Tsunami; my bucket calf, Slim; and I made a Lego model of my pig barn for the STEM Architectural Block Construction project.

I also took my pigs and STEM ABC project to the Kansas State Fair. My Lego model got a purple ribbon and a Best in Show award at the state fair. My favorite 4-H activity this year was showing my pigs in Overbrook, where I was the Reserve Champion Junior Showman, and all of my pigs won their classes.

My favorite memory from this year was hanging out with and petting my favorite pig, Sunny. I was happy to win reserve showmanship with him.

Celebrating National 4-H Week, Oct. 2-8, 2022!

Meet a local 4-Her: Allie Reeser, shepherding a new project in 2022

My name is Allison Reeser; this is my eighth year in 4-H and my first year in the sheep project. My sister and I decided this year we would like to try a new project, sheep. So to get us started, for our birthdays our parents and grandparents bought each of us a ewe and wether lamb.

In late March, our journey began by going to a local farmer’s farm to pick out our lambs. The lambs were kept at our grandparent’s house, and every day my sister and I would go to their house twice a day to feed and water them.

During this project, I learned how to gradually increase their feed to help work them up to being on full feed, how to clean a sheep pen, how to bathe and shear sheep, how to show sheep properly, and how much work it takes to take care of them at the fair.

Even though I was sad at the Overbrook fair when I had to sell my market lamb, I enjoyed the experience and look forward to showing my ewe again next summer.

Celebrating National 4-H Week, Oct. 2-8, 2022!

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