Category Archives: Faith

A Cowboy’s Faith: Go ahead do it

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Can’t is over in the ditch.”

That was first grade teacher Mrs. Gibson’s response, 62 years ago; when classmates said something couldn’t be done.

“Don’t say it can’t be done; just find another way to get accomplished what’s needed.”

That was coworker Sean Carter at the recent Farm Profit Seminar when somebody said there was no more display space.

While not always completely accurate in either scenario, both statements encourage efforts for finding solutions when quitting is easier.

Looking around the ranch front, office situations, community needs, and seemingly unconquerable projects everywhere, “can’t” is a common analysis.

An excuse of one kind or another can be determined for nearly every project that requires extra effort, coordination and cooperation.

In grade school long ago, it was easy for any kid to readily contend: “I can’t do that.” Whether printing their name, erasing the chalk board or adding one and one, the teacher proved everyone could do it.

Finding places for late arriving sponsors at last week’s seminar was as simple; crowd together, share areas, use smaller tables. Can’t was sure not the solution when all originally planned sponsorship areas were filled.

Of course, getting everything accomplished that the majority first insist can’t be done isn’t always nearly that easy. Still all things considered, generally, “where there’s a will, there’s a way,” quoting a common longtime philosophy.

That’ll require a bit of give and take from everybody involved. Certain ones are not going to get exactly their method. It must be united effort for best results.

Zion Lutheran youth mark Ash Wednesday by serving others

Zion youth serve and help church members carry plates and drinks to their tables.

Wednesday, March 6, 2019, was a special day for Christians – it was Ash Wednesday, which marks the beginning of the Lenten season.

To celebrate this special day this year at the Zion Lutheran Church, Vassar, the church’s youth group served a spaghetti casserole dinner before the Ash Wednesday service. The meal was served for free will donations as a fundraiser to send the senior youth members to the national youth convention this summer.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Cold night healthcare rewarded

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Could you please come help a heifer with a prolapse from birthing her calf?”
It was 2 o’clock in the morning, below freezing, winter moisture, herdsman calling the veterinarian 25 miles away.
Less than an hour, not smiling but ready for her job, the bundled-up animal health doctor arrived.
Heifer and wet but alive newborn were in protection of the barn. That is a major deal compared to the wet, cold, snowy mud dim shadowy corral.
Or, in the middle of the half section pasture miles from civilization with pickup headlights and low-battery flashlights. Through the decades there have been all of those scenarios thankfully with understanding yet inner-grudgingly cooperating veterinarians.
Such medical assistance is difficult in the best of environment softened some being inside despite tightness of confinement. Sanitation is of obvious importance with barn straw bedding considerably better than sloppy germ-ridden barnyard conditions.
Sure not knowing much about the physical aspects of it all, for the even less informed, simple explanation seems appropriate. Mr. Webster said, “Prolapse is to slip or fall out of its proper place in the body.”
What comes out must go back in, stay there, combat any infections which might arise, and heal up. The very good doctor adjusted, manipulated, pushed, medicated and got everything in place again sewed up tight.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Are medicines really needed?

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.Evidently, the ranch ought to become a pharmacy. That would be a “drug store” decades gone by, but it might get wrong connotation nowadays.

Boldface headlines daily target law-breaking news about “pills” and other such consumptions, unknown to ranch life, for “recreational” purpose.

“Getting high,” it’s said, although really wouldn’t know. Horseback ride on a brisk winter morning serves that purpose here.

Perhaps, giant medicine chest would be more accurate description of the mudroom and kitchen.

Except, most of the always very high dollar “supposed preventives, treatments” recommended health improvements aren’t in a cabinet. They’re here, there, wherever, ready for immediate use upon need or suggestion.

Now, this includes both livestock and human medication, or definition derivative thereof, maybe painkiller, to use old timer’s common terminology.

It’d be hard to know which requires more medicine these days: cattle, horses, and cats, or the ranchers. Counting all of the bottles and packages, there’s actually quite a bit more for critters.

That said, neither required such health “necessities” half century ago, can’t remember hardly any. Oh, a colt might get kerosene lard if a cut swelled up, but that was it.

Grandma, when she was in her 80s, would take one of Carter’s Little Pills. Dad was on high blood pressure tablets, and took one whenever he remembered. Mom never had any medicine period until terminal diagnosis.

Help House News: Prom closet opens for upcoming enchanted evening

By Raylene Quaney 

Help House will open its Prom Closet 4-7 p.m. Monday, March 4, 2019, and it will be open each day during regular hours until the selection of beautiful dress have been chosen by girls thoughout Osage County for their special night. We will also have jewelry available to enhance the evening wear. All girls are invited to come in on March 4, and be among the first to find their dress for that big night.

Good Sense budget class

The next “Good Sense” budget class will be held 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday, March 11, at Help House. This is a one-day class. Call 785-828-4888 for more information and to register.

Volunteer training scheduled

Help House’s annual volunteer training will be held on March 18. Registration begins at 9 a.m. All volunteers are asked to participate in this training at least once. If you have thought about becoming a volunteer and would like to know more about Help House, you are welcome to attend. Call the office to register.

Mobile food pantries

Mobile Food Pantry dates: Carbondale location is Carbondale Church of Christian Fellowship, 12 p.m. on the 2nd Tuesday, March 12; Osage City distribution is located at Osage City Community Center at 10 a.m. on the 3rd Thursday, March 21; Melvern Mobile Pantry has been cancelled until further notice; Burlingame distribution is held at the Burlingame Federated Church at 10 a.m. on the 3rd Thursday, March 21; Lyndon distribution is located at Jones Park on East Sixth Street, at 12 p.m. on the third Friday, March 15. Recipients in the mobile pantry are asked to be in line 15 to 20 minutes before starting time to be in the count to determine how much of each item each family will receive. Help House sponsors the Lyndon and Carbondale mobile pantries.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Dedication receives right reward

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“There were five drooling coyotes on the pond dam this morning.”

That was the son-herdsman’s report in the back door after another check on the first calf heifers in the corral.

In the frigid cold, the varmints were anxious for a warm tasty breakfast of afterbirth should a baby arrive. Obviously, they knew the flavor and somehow instinctively readily came into the barnyard in anticipation of free easy taking.

Should a calf arrive when nobody was overlooking the herd, the wild ones would all pounce for food without manners.

If new momma is attentive to her newfound duties, generally the baby wouldn’t be in initial harm. That can change if mother moves away from a cold shivering one or there is apparent newborn weakness.

Attentiveness to assist first calvers is a major ordeal, let alone worrying about hungry canines. It’s an every three hour task day and night confirming if help is required. Having gone through that dreadful ranch task, fortunately the younger stockman and his mom will still do the work.

Typically, especially in the subzero chill index, if there are telltale signs of an arrival expectant momma is moved inside. That far from eliminates problems but reduces elements harshness.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Calving by nature’s plan

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Mother Nature does exactly what she wants.”

Cows work just like her. When momma decides to give birth she’ll do it, or do her best trying. Contrarily it’s almost impossible to predict when that’ll be despite telltale signs often turning out differently.

First of February is sometimes considered beginning of spring calving season, although ranches have varying philosophical datelines. Certain operations set later times to begin, and some producers calve in the fall, summer and even summer.

Not nearly as many as used to be, but several cow-calf managers have babies arriving year around. It’s determined when the bull is turned into the cowherd.

Everything being just right, cow is romanced by the bull that day maybe even within minutes fertile embryo starts growing. A baby calf should be on the ground nine months, nine days, nine hours, nine minutes, nine seconds later. It’s seldom exactly that precise and often not even close.

Uncountable tribulations can come into play in this mating game. At the beginning of the season, Mr. Bull is eager and ready to go. Certain sweet, fancy, foxy, young heifers on high nutrition feel the same anticipating action.

More mature mommas, baby at side taking breakfast, generally aren’t so fast. By nature’s intent, inner body parts need a bit of rest, relaxing, healing before starting the process again.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Songs tell county’s history

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Hello. This is Monte Selby. I have a grant to write and sing songs about Morris County. Several people suggested I talk to you. Could I come by your office and visit?”

Sure, that’ll be fine.

Reflections from growing up in a farm town became one song Monte and Martin Selby presented in concert.

Laura Mae

Laura Mae is your best friend
Always smile and say hello
Deliver groceries to your home
That’s my job, off I’d go
Twice a day, I’m on the go

My whole life, I’ve ridden my horse
Love to be a cowboy – rope and ride
Nearly 50 years, had the time of my life
But back as a kid, I had to bide my time
Mama had work, gotta bide my time

You see, Daddy had an accident on the farm
So Mama said we gotta make money somehow
A few years later what mama found was a
Grocery store in the middle of town
Right on Main Street, middle of town, they’d say….

Laura Mae is your best friend
Always smile and say hello
Deliver groceries to your home
That’s my job, off I’d go
Twice a day, I’m on the go

A Cowboy’s Faith: Slow better than ditch

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Weather can change in the blink of an eye.”

Forecasts had been fairly consistent for several days from one predictor to the next.

“It’ll be above freezing with rain turning to snow.”

Exact timing when transitions were to take place varied moving later in the day with the snow.

“If it starts snowing or the sky looks like it’s coming soon, hit the road.” That was the plan.

Nearly everybody had already left the office early with the holiday weekend.

With most work done best possible and procrastinating on the reminder, headed out the door 45 minutes early.

It was raining, had been off and on, throughout the day, now steady, yet not all that hard. Dashboard temperature gauge read 36 degrees.

Obviously others had followed trend leaving work ahead of time with highways pretty much jam packed.

It was moving fast and smoothly with cruise fixed well above posted signs but generally allowable by the cherry top. (That’s what they used to be called when law enforcement was readily identifiable like Andy and Barney.)

Driving with little thought other than get riding done as soon as at the ranch, eat supper and do nothing.

All of a sudden out of nowhere seemingly passing a semi-truck, the roadway became covered with snow and apparent slickness.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Wet waste growth tomorrow

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“This is sure going to waste a lot of feed.”

After a day of rain, then five inches of snow overnight, everything was a mess.

Livestock must be fed despite weather and more so when there’s icy cold water topped with snow.

Better off than another rancher who reported an inch of rain covered by 10 inches of snow.

So, load up the feed and head to the bellowing cows rambling on wet prairie begging for bales.

Always try to find the lowest quality in the hay pile to unroll on the sloppy ground. Greedy, acting like they’re starved, no hay for 24 hours or less, mommas dive into the free food.

No respectful appreciation for the breakfast, rudely stomping hay into the wet snow more than actually being consumed.

Outsider unaware of actual working ranch conditions would air opinions of better methods for less loss.

“Put the hay in a big baler feeder, so they don’t tromp it.” That’ll work with a small herd sometimes, even those 40 replacement heifers in the growing lot.

But for 260 cows in the Flint Hills such really becomes almost impossible.

A Missions Project Story: Through the hearts of children

By Audrey Cop

How does a small group of children at a little church in a little town called Melvern, Kansas, serve God in a really big way in the world? In this instance it happened through a missions project that started in the hearts and minds of a handful of children in a small Sunday school class, in a small local church.

Around the first part of August 2018, several children at the Melvern United Methodist Church Sunday school class came up with an idea to help people in Africa have safe drinking water for their families. The children had learned that many of the young children in these countries were dying from diseases caused by contaminated water. The parents have no source of water to provide for their children – other than the contaminated rivers and streams around them. So, the children started giving their Sunday school donations to a designated clean water project just for this purpose.

Then, the idea expanded to include the children, age kindergarten through fifth grade, at that church’s weekly after-school ministry, called “The ROCK”. The program’s name stands for Reaching Out to Christ’s Kids. This program is available to all children in the area, regardless of whether they attend that church; it meets after school on Wednesday evenings. Then there were about 20 total children involved in the missions’ project.

The children’s group decided to expand their clean water project to include sustainable food sources for people in Africa. The children had also learned how so many other children are hungry and malnourished because there is not enough food for these families. They expanded the mission project to include purchasing chickens for eggs and dairy animals for milk and cheese to provide to the families. The families could consume the eggs, milk and cheese and sell any excess food to provide much needed additional income for their families.

As a group, we prayed for God to bless this project and help us raise the money to help those in need. The children set a goal of $500 to be reached by April 2019.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Cowboy never slept in

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“I’ve always liked to get up early, there was always lots of work that I needed and wanted to do.”

Generally the day started way before daylight, horse waiting at the gate to be saddled and off to pasture work.

Cowboy has always been his first profession, although Kenny Muller certainly has been successful in many agriculture endeavors.

Slowed down a bit the cowboy still rises at dawn anxious to pursue plans in his sharp forever active mind.

Family was joined by friends of a lifetime for Kenneth Muller’s 90th birthday celebration. Most know him as Kenny.

Moved from the ranch to town residence, it’s been awhile since horseback, but the pickup gets daily use. Conversation always centers on heartfelt cowboy life in the Flint Hills.

Kenny was a grocery store carryout boy’s first and always hero-idol-mentor; wanted to be a cowboy just like him.

Perfect image always properly shaped hat, clean cut, sharp dressed, friendly, outgoing with saddled horse in the trailer.

In high demand for day work, Kenny assisted cattle owners over a wide area with roundup, branding, whatever needed.

Horsepower is essential for top cowboys and Kenny always rode the best. Whether cutting a stray from the herd or roping a sick one for doctoring, his horse knew the job. They were ranch raised result of Kenny’s horse breeding program headed by top stallion power.

Proof of quality came first with local winnings followed by recognition nationwide. Kenny’s horses claimed halter championships then as pleasure riders soon earning reining and cow work awards. Collecting trophy saddles, Kenny put them to good use in his life’s trade.

Help House News: Start stocking up now for Souper Bowl Sunday

By Raylene Quaney

Now that we are into a new year it is time for Help House’s annual Souper Bowl Soup-A-Thon. We encourage churches, school organizations, youth groups, civic organizations, businesses to get involved. See which group can collect the most number of items to be donated to the Help House Food Pantry. We suggest organizations collect cans of soup and boxes of crackers, each counts as one item. Set a basket or tub out in your entryway, by your front door, or ask members to bring an item or two when they attend a game or a meeting. Send your members out into their neighborhoods to collect.

The winners will receive one of three awards, a silver, bronze or gold ladle, which is returned the next year to be passed along to the next winners, along with recognition in Help House’s newsletter. So start collecting now, and the contest will end on Feb. 3, 2019, Super Bowl Sunday. Soup and crackers collections can be brought to Help House the following week to be counted and entered into the contest.

Volunteers make the difference

During the Help House annual board meeting in November a number of volunteers were recognized for their dedication. John Neill received volunteer of the year award after giving 340.75 hours of his time to serve others at Help House in 2018. Additional awards were given to those donating over 200 hours, including Lance Jones, with 220.5 hours, and Raylene Quaney, 286 hours. Those with more than 100 hours were Joetta Asbury, Patty Colson, Carolyn Hamman, Joan Hazelton, Ted Hazelton, Ann Hladky, Lisa May, and Bev Russo-Willard. As we have said many times we could not open our doors without our amazing volunteers. Collectively, 6,128 hours were given during 2018 by more than 115 volunteers.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Jake dedicated to rodeo

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Roll ’em. Come on. Get down on that bull. Put your legs down.”

Jake must have said that a jillion times in his lifelong loving career as a rodeo stock contractor.

The show must go on, no wannabe cowboy wimping around. Chutegate could just open ready or not.

“The Rodeo and Sale Barn World has lost a great man. John B. “Jake” Jacobsen, 89, rural Delia, passed away Saturday, Dec. 15, 2018, at his home.”

Obituary opening is the most accurate description one could ever make.

Many have wanted to be rodeo contractors, but none had the business closer to their heart than Jake.

He lived, literally, to produce rodeos with the best livestock for a quality family show.

It’s been more than four decades, but like right now. Rodeo announcer Max Stowell introducing, Jake always rode in the grand entry.

When the national anthem concluded, Jake headed to the bucking chutes, unmounted, bareback riders better be ready.

Jake always opened the chutegate for the rough stock events, no cowboy piddling, rodeo spectators wanted action.

A family business, Jacobsen Rodeo Company contracted rodeos in Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska and Oklahoma. Their small trailer house was home as they’d arrive with livestock two days ahead of rodeo time.

Welcome smile drooling lip of snuff, always a bit round, Jake with Pearl, Dale and Sis were friends of everybody.

Nothing makes a rodeo producer grin wider than his livestock bettering cowboys.

Jake beamed to one champion bronc rider, “I don’t know how many you’ve ridden. But, I can tell you every one that bucked you off.”

A Cowboy’s Faith: Kindness is most important

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.Life’s changes for betterment ahead are the optimistic blueprint many consider at year’s end.

Annual resolutions are being developed and revised so they won’t be short lived as always before.

Listed for majority are make more money, diet, increase exercise, lose weight and live healthier.

Frequent others include manage debt improving finances, enhance family relations, become higher educated, get a better job, and reduce stress.

Without exception, New Year’s resolutions will be broken, but if only one is partially fulfilled it’s better than before.

Regardless of personal philosophies about all of the vast annual hype of the season, let’s help somebody now.

What else is there in life other than health, happiness and eternity than doing for each other, sincerely?

This is actually very easy, quite simple, yet more uncommon all of the time.

Why not try to make life better for another? Talk to more and different people, even strangers on the street. With few exceptions people like to talk and for others to know about themselves.

Ask how their life truly is? Then listen, look them square in the eye, be interested, and be concerned if there’s that need.

Then, comment, offer thoughts, even suggestions, perhaps points for guidance if sought in the least form.

Make a telephone call to an acquaintance of long ago, or a neighbor living alone, perhaps in an assisted care facility.

Everybody just loves to get mail in the box, write a note, and send a card. It’ll make a day and a memory never ceasing. Go ahead send a text, an email, or other social media to make contact.

St. Patrick’s showcases Nativity in special Epiphany celebration

St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, Scranton, will host its fourth Nativity Showcase 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 6, 2019, in conjunction with the Epiphany of Our Lord. To close the Christmas season, all are invited to view the new house of worship of St. Patrick’s of Scranton adorned for Christmas, and view the many Nativity sets that members and friends of the parish have on display.

Descriptions on some Nativity sets share their special meanings to their owners. There will be many sizes, number of pieces, and varied artistic interpretations of the Nativity. In its fourth year, the event is becoming a parish and community tradition; last year’s event had more than 200 Nativities.

Nativities are welcome from community members, both Catholic and other religious denominations, to be displayed at the showcase. For more information or to share a Nativity, contact Lois Shuck, 785-665-7893, or Mary Burgett, 785-836-7887.

Church members continue to raise funds for the new church. Freewill donations will be accepted and will go to the building fund.

St. Patrick’s of Scranton invites everyone to the special showcase on Epiphany Sunday, Jan. 6, honoring the Nativity. The church is at 400 E. Bracken St., Scranton.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Youth tell real story

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Children’s Christmas programs rightly bring out the true meaning of the season.”

With all of the commercialization towards shopping and buying gifts starting before Halloween, reason for Christmas is often completely forgotten.

Likewise, elaborate decorating seems to have gotten out of hand, for lack of a more appropriate description of all the vast lightings. It sure makes the electrical companies happy undoubtedly.

Through all of this Christmas “hype,” there is NO factual recognition of what Christmas is really all about.

In viewing literally hundreds of community and public Christmas decorating, there has been only one notable exception.

A display with a few strings of lights had a small nativity scene. That’s Christmas, celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ, savior of the world, life eternal for all believers.

Used to be, a number of churches would have at least some nativity scene.  That’s a simple manger with Christ child, Mary, Joseph, sheep, donkey, shepherds, and wise men.

Sadly, this year, none have been seen as of yet. Live nativities became popular for a time, but have dropped out of fad as well.

Notable, Saint Francis of Assisi is credited with creating the first live nativity scene in 1223 to cultivate the worship of Christ. He was inspired by his visit to the Holy Land seeing Jesus’ birthplace. The idea motivated communities to stage such portrayals.

Although, Christmas programs are still part of the season’s celebrations, most do not have any inclination of the true reasoning. Modern songs often leave a seemingly waning feeling.

Reflecting, grade school pageants of decades gone by never reflected the true celebration either. Yet, singing brought swinging joy to performers and audience with nostalgic appreciation and familiarity.

Fortunately, a few churches, hopefully more than realized, still host children’s Christmas plays highlighting Jesus’ birth and purpose.

Six decades ago, it was a special heartfelt inspiration portraying a shepherd, wearing night robe, turban and carrying a cane.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Cards express season’s sentiments

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.Has the mailman come yet?

That’s a common question around most ranch homes year around. Depending on weather, time of year, flat tires, unforeseeable conditions, it’s not always the same time.

Exclamation of question becomes more emphatic during this season. When the answer is “Yes,” there’s a dash outside regardless of temperature to see if there are any Christmas cards.

Earlier in the month a couple of times returnee’s lower lip drooped. Just a newspaper and another statement were in hand.

Fortunately, it’s picked up from a card or two, maybe a half dozen in recent days. Excitement continues to mount seeing where the envelopes are from and deciding which to open first.

“Don’t rip ’em, be careful, use the letter opener,” scowling orders more than once.

Those from afar with personal addresses get preference of the computerized even sometimes commercialized cards.

A store bought card with just a signature gets a quick once over. When the card is a photograph of the sender, even their family, makes it certainly special. Homemade cards are almost nonexistent nowadays.

The cards with a letter are always read carefully, usually then again. Many are duplicated the same to all on their list, yet informative catchup of the year gone by.

There are still a few with handwritten notes. Maybe just a sentence or two, but sometimes newsy paragraphs. That dairymaid across the section goes all out with several pages of handwriting happenings.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Changing trees remain spiritual

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.Christmas trees have gone through a lot of fads in the past six decades.

All of the specially decorated Christmas tree shows so popular nowadays makes one reflect what has come and gone.

Origin and history of Christmas trees varies widely according to the source, country and time. Generally, Germany is credited with starting today’s Christmas tree tradition in the 16th century, while other reports go back much earlier.

Devout Christians symbolically brought decorated evergreen trees into their homes. A green, thriving tree in the winter reminded people of hope, new and everlasting life promised by Christ’s birth

For a number of years, fir trees served the tradition for many families. Right before Thanksgiving, the produce distributor unloaded an alley full of various sized fir trees at the family grocery store.

They were priced by height, three-footers about a buck. Taller ones went up to $3 for those reaching the ceiling.

A dozen fir trees were displayed for sale at the storefront with persnickety customers carefully evaluating each one. A number of buyers wanted theirs delivered, making a mess in the delivery wagon, or blowing off the top carrier.

Quite differently shaped, most would consider more attractive, pine trees, both long and short needle varieties, increased in popularity. Higher priced, harder to handle, they soon replaced fir trees.

Somebody decided the pine trees ought to be painted, often white, decorated with colored balls enhanced by revolving light.

Aluminum trees came shortly after, displayed semblance to the painted trees.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Ronnie was always there

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“If anything needed to be done, Ronnie would make certain it was completed.”

Just as sure, whatever the task there would be smiles for everybody involved.

Recent passing of Ron Shivers, often referred to as Ronnie, although in his eighth decade, was a very sad loss.

Oh, before going any further, pronunciation of Shivers is identical to spelling, like shivering cold, no long “I.”

Actually impossible to comprehend how diversified Ronnie was and how many different people and functions he assisted.

A hometown newspaper feature most appropriately, accurately, complimentarily identified him: “Mr. Volunteer.”

Among his many diverse talents, Ron was a horseman, active in leadership of several horse show groups He was demanded as a judge at a lot of horseshows for a number of years.

Often, Ronnie would adjudicate the same entries two days in a row; sometimes the same ones the next two-day weekend. That’s a difficult task for the best horsemen, and Ron was always credited as unbiased, completely fair to every participant.

For the first part of his career, starting at an early age, he was a trucker for several companies. Ronnie always pulled the air horn and kept it down whenever passing the ranch no matter the time of day.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Free delivery twice daily

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.A grocery store delivery boy knows every house and every street in the rural town to get there.

Oh, don’t ever ask what the name of the street is, that’s really insignificant. But, those back alleys with the gravel are usually the best and easiest to get to most homes.

Front doors are visitor’s entrance, but the back door generally leads onto the porch right into the kitchen. That’s the best route to deliver groceries.

When parents run a grocery store, the son is expected to do everything there is to be done. From the time could walk would always go with Dad delivering groceries.

Morning delivery was at 10:30, so customers had what they needed for dinner. Afternoon delivery, at 5 o’clock, arrived before supper.

At least three deliveries were made on Saturday, because the store was always closed Sunday. Another run was often made during holiday weekends, or just if somebody called and wanted groceries.

Most days the delivery wagon was packed full with orders. Sometimes there just wasn’t enough room for everything with several filled boxes going to one home.

So those on the west side of town went first, and then back for deliveries east of the Neosho River bridge. Wednesday deliveries sometimes only had half dozen orders twice a day.

First delivery wagon remembered was a cream-colored Kaiser. It was replaced by a specially ordered 1957 Chevrolet panel wagon complete with rear wings. Turquoise in color, broad side panels had big bright red lettering advertising: “Buchman’s Grocery, Free Delivery Twice Daily, Call 410.”

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas