Category Archives: Faith

A Cowboy’s Faith: Generosity should be appreciated

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth.”

The old familiar saying has come to mind several times over the decades.

Sometimes it does relate to horses and as often to life and people in general.

First off perhaps important to clarify exactly what the statement means and where it really originated.

A horse’s teeth become more protruded appearing longer with maturity. Thus comes the term “long in tooth” meaning an older horse. Those with much experience can open a horse’s mouth and determine almost exactly the age of a horse.

So, checking a horse’s mouth would be a sign of mistrust towards the gift giver and bad manners.

The polite thing to do is simply to say “thank you” and accept the gift horse graciously.

Actually the comment relates to anything given without obligation or expecting something in return.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Inspirational service to others

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Life is so precious very short making friends and family such importance only completely realized when one is lost.”

A crushing blow has been passing of the best friend true inspirational guiding confidant brother in spirit.

Call came that Ron Wilson had a stroke perhaps followed by a heart attack and he’d requested presence.

Upon arrival, his children, two siblings and an uncle were bedside verifying Ron’s serious condition. Time was spent pacifying praying for the dearest yet unaware comrade.

Realizing the treasured life was only in God’s hands, trust was given Him and His medical servants. Ron passed the following morning.

Complete heart sinking depressed sadness overcame, reflecting inspiration and services provided in 56 years.

Two beanpole third-string seventh grade basketball players, Ron, a farm boy, and the grocery store town kid wannabe cowboy met. On the cold armory floor lifetime friendship was born.

In high school highly intellectual yet country common Ron inspired as district star farmer and state public speaking finalist. Family farm was offered location for a rewarding vo-ag hog cooperative.

With a powerful noisy classic Ford, Ron was transportation for the girl watching pair. When wannabe’s small cowherd became short of feed, opportunity was presented to harvest hay on shares with farm family assistance.

Off to college Ron attended the cow college insistent the southbound friend follow trail for the second semester. Positive in many ways first day for wannabe on the campus, bride-to-be became acquaintance.

As sophomore dormitory roommate, Ron served as wedding groomsman that summer on his 20th birthday.

Friendship enhanced while Ron went many avenues, farming, drag racing, oilfield, trucker, feed-equipment distributor, insurance-investments, always fishing.

Help House News: Giving thanks for the blessings of community

By Raylene Quaney

Signup for Thanksgiving food baskets has been completed at Help House. Those who received pick-up slips will need to come on the date on the slip due to the delivery schedule of the poultry. Delivery will be either 1-2 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13, or 1:30-2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 26. Help House will be closed Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, Nov. 28, and Friday Nov. 29.

Help House still needs donations for the Thanksgiving food boxes. Items needed are cake mixes, frosting, complete pumpkin pie filling mix, Jiffy brand pie crust mixes for the desserts, Jell-O and canned fruit for salad makings, and rolls. If you prefer we accept cash donations that can be used to purchase these items as well. Just designate on your check that it is for the “Thanksgiving Food Baskets”.

Christmas Stores

Help House Christmas Stores are on the following dates for families who have not been adopted by ECAT, ECKAN, or other Christmas programs. There is a change in how the parent and grandparent shopping will occur this year. The Children’s Shopping Day will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7. Santa’s elves will assist children in selecting one gift per parent per child. Then they will wrap them to take home.

Parents and caregivers will need to sign up to schedule their shopping time this year. Times available will be 4-7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 9, and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 10, Wednesday, Dec. 11, Thursday, Dec. 12, and Friday, Dec. 13.

Grandparents and others will need to sign up for their shopping times as well. Those dates will be 4-7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 16, and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 17th, Wednesday, Dec. 18, Thursday, Dec. 19, and Friday, Dec. 20.

Shop local, help local

Remember while shopping at  Jerry’s Thriftway in Osage City, and Overbrook Thriftway and Carbondale Thriftway, you will see at the register a card that reads, “You may now make a donation to Help House for the Food Pantry by asking the clerk to add either $1 or $5 to the total of your bill.” It is that easy and we thank everyone for your continued support and donation. We are very grateful to Jim O’Neill and Jerry Geisy for their continued support of Help House.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Continued efforts yield results

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“The squeaky wheel gets the grease.”

An old saying going back centuries has several meanings depending on the subject at hand.

Of course most agree to the mechanical aspect of the statement. When there’s friction in wheel rotation grease does at least stop the irritating noise until further attention can be given.

That’s led to common reference that the most noticeable problems are the most likely to get attention needed.

Others take advantage of such attitude to continue complaining about certain issues just to get their own way. Sometimes perhaps too often their demands are met in order to stop the argumentation and badgering.

Yet there is additional positive truth in the saying when it comes to getting action done on anything.

As a professional media marketing consultant, entire objective is to help others. That generally takes many avenues in order to completely spread the word about what they have to offer.

Of course paid advertising is one way. Yet which form is best to return the highest investment response?

The answer is not one but several. To get the word out about any matter requires marbles in a jar. A combination of efforts will work together to yield maximum results.

While helping promote a recent community attraction, the event coordinator became distressed in lack of mutual interest and response.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Ranch crew mission accomplished

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“There’s a bunch in that timber draw and they won’t move let alone come out.”

That was the ranch manager talking to the cowboy and cowgirl crew rounding up calves to sell.

Gather of this pasture known for renegades started with initial directions to horseback assistants. “Somebody will need to hold this horse while I walk the timber. There’s no way to ride through the brush.”

Before too long the herd from the north collected by the four-wheeler met with those brought out of cover. Diagonally headed northeast, one bitty from the south tore back from where she came with more pairs tailing after.

No whoop and holler but eight riders exploded into action on both sides attempting to prevent a potential stampede. Grudge apparent, the pairs were regrouped with others as one bitty headed astray yet toward the corral.

“Get her,” was the manager’s order. Threesome lariats unraveled went to pursue and in short order had cow roped, driving calf alongside into the pen.

By that time, a handful had escaped back to the north fence with determination made to save remainders.

Without much ado, that group was nearly corralled when a bawling heifer scattered past the gatherers. Fortunately that replacement quality bovine was quickly roped by the southpaw cowgirl and persuaded into confinement.

Help House News: Stocking up the shelves to help make happy holidays

By Raylene Quaney

Looking ahead to the holidays, it seems impossible, but they are just around the corner. Help House has begun signing up for Thanksgiving baskets. A family of one to four can sign up for a chicken. A family of five or more can sign up for a turkey. There will be a limited number available of each. It is on a first come first served basis.

Help House also needs donations for the Thanksgiving food boxes. Items needed are cake mixes, frosting, complete pumpkin pie filling mix, Jiffy brand pie crust mixes for the deserts, Jell-O and canned fruit for salad makings, and rolls. We are accepting cash donations that can be used to purchase these items as well. Just designate on your check that it is for the “Thanksgiving Food Baskets”.

Nov. 1, we will be accepting and taking donations for the Christmas Store. Gifts for adults, teens, children and infants are welcome and appreciated. Last year 53 adults selected gifts for 157 children at no charge during the shopping season.

Coat closet opens

The Help House Coat Closet opened on Oct. 1  and will be open through Oct. 31 each day during regular hours. We are accepting donations for clean and gently worn coats especially infants and children’s coats. They are always in short supply, so if your children have coats they have outgrown but are still in good condition, please consider sharing with another child who may not have a coat for this winter. We also can use men’s and women’s coats in all sizes, coveralls or overalls for those who have to work outside in the weather, and hats and gloves for everyone. If you are bringing coats or any other donations to Help House,  bring them in when we are open as we have been forced to lock the donation shed when we leave due to continued vandalism of the contents during hours that we are closed. We know this is an inconvenience to those wishing to donate but we were left with no choice due to the actions of a few. We do not want items left outside at the back door or outside the shed because if animals get into the boxes or sacks or if it rains the items are ruined and have to be disposed of and that is not something we want to have to do. So we ask for your understanding and cooperation. 

A Cowboy’s Faith: Chaps are for protection

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Nowadays people in all sorts of endeavors wear chaps.”

While cowboys may have been the original chaps wearers, Native Americans known as Indians to some were likely predecessors.

What those first natives in the Flint Hills actually wore is typically referred as buckskins, strong semblance to chaps.

For those unknowing, best define chaps. Mr. Webster said, “Chaps are sturdy coverings for the legs consisting of leggings and a belt.”

With a prod from Mrs. Webster, he shyly went ahead to admit: “They are buckled on over jeans. But have no seat and are not joined at the crotch (oops).”

Furthering description: “Chaps are designed for leg protection and originally made with leather.”

The name is shortened version of the Spanish word chaparreras (this is spelled correctly even though the computer disagrees).

Bringing up insignificant point for topic at hand, the alma mater rodeo group was long known as the Chaps Club. Change came after a couple decades as seemingly outsiders, maybe even insiders, couldn’t comprehend correlation between chaps and the sport. So it became the K-State Rodeo Club.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Cowboys do wear ties

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“The kind of tie he wears is a sign of the man he is.”

What a weird unnecessary thing to say. Yet there is certain truthfulness to the comment.

Of course, majority of men don’t wear ties, at least not very often. Some never wear a tie and wouldn’t think of it.

Something about having a tie on gives a man a professional, even an official look. Apparently not as common anymore, teachers used to generally wear ties. It made them head of the class, more respected, receiving the attention expected and deserved.

Generally men in leadership positions sport a four-in-hand tie, obviously the colored cloth piece intertwined in a four-in-hand knot. Broad end of the tie around the neck crosses over the narrow end forming a knot tightened under the collar.

A few men always wear bow ties presenting their unique yet defining role.

Interesting as an elementary student and yet today more than a half-century later evaluating four-in-hand ties and wide variations thereof. Seems nowadays most men hand-manipulate their own ties, but through the ages there were “fake ties,” often referred as “clip-ons.”

Requirement of new job a decade ago was wearing a tie to be a respected marketing consultant. It’s become distinctive identity to always have a tie on to present one’s best side to a potential client.

Free Christian concert slated in Overbrook Sunday evening

OVERBROOK, Kan. – There will be a free concert on Sunday, Oct. 13, 2019, at Grace Community Church, Overbrook. “The Witness Band” is a six-member group, which includes the church’s member Gary Collins. The band has been performing across the Midwest since 1994.

The Witness Band, from left, Phil Wizer, Norman Tyler, Duane Richardson, Gary Collins, Jeannie Furst, and Jeff Furst. Courtesy photo.

“It is special to get to praise the Lord with your church family,” Collins said, “We, as a band, love using the talents that God has given us to praise Him, and it is a privilege to serve the Lord in this manner. All the glory goes to God our Father!”

The Witness Band plays Southern Gospel to Christian Country. They will be performing a mix of songs they originally wrote along with other popular tunes.

The public is invited to attend this free concert which will begin at 6 p.m. in the church’s main sanctuary. The concert is expected to last about an hour.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Help filling the tank

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Low Fuel”

A buzzer has gone off and the “idiot light” has shown bright twice in the past two weeks. An initial irritation, but well worth it considering consequences when running out of gas.

However after that deserved warning there’s no inkling how miles before it goes completely dry. In decades gone by there wasn’t any clue of such either than possibly bad unforgettable experiences.

Previously, only a gauge moved from full to quarter to half to bottom-quarter to red meaning empty.

Few haven’t kept the pedal going despite being made aware fuel was supposedly all gone. It sometimes seemed to create an inner dare to see just how many miles were left in the tank. Those tempters have generally been caught and run out at least once. They’ll not speculate the trickle of gasoline remaining again or at least for an extended time.

Nowadays drivers are spoiled comparatively as there’s a gadget revealing “fuel range” before a completely vacant tank. Every vehicle’s a little different and lots of things can come into play until an engine dies from no fuel.

Actually some buzzer warnings go off when the indicator has just shown “50 miles.” But there’s still a gut uncertainty uneasiness to get to the gas pump as quickly as possible.

Half-full means half-empty to many smart drivers and if the gauge gets near just-a-quarter, fill up is in order. Others wait until it’s below that line sneaking into the red before finding a pump. Those who just keep going are often sorry.

Slow learners have run out too often, like speeders getting citations, they just don’t get it, never learn.

Complications can be extensive when empty in the middle of nowhere. It’s a long walk home on a wide open country road with no travelers, especially in the days before cell phones.

Of many such semblances two are most memorable. One was traveling in Iowa to judge a horseshow; fortunately a congenial farmer had a tank to help out.

Another was nighttime two miles from home and passenger well along with unborn first child. Walked to ranch, filled gallon gasoline jug, rode ugly white mare Candy back, and eventually all was just fine.

There’s always been an upper power looking down helping out.

Reminded of Matthew 20:23: “My Father is taking care of that.”

A Cowboy’s Faith: Wrecked fence needs repaired

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Somebody came across the highway again, tore the fence down and a car’s out in the brome.”

Not much of a shock hearing the news as it’s happened a half dozen times in five decades.

Circumstances are generally similar although actually what really happened is usually never known. Drivers from the east don’t heed the stop sign and traverse the north-south main highway right across the field.

Obviously to continue into the ditch through rough terrain and beyond would indicate pedal-to-the-metal exceeding speed.

Likely other factors are involved whether just not paying attention, dozing, off, nipping a bit, too many medications, whatever.

Used to be it was an abandoned country road grown into timber where the intruding out-of-control vehicles were eventually stopped. At least one time a fatality resulted, and on other occasions minor and even sometimes serious injuries.

Now, trees and old lane are gone with fenced pasture. That doesn’t stop wild traffic intrusion, and always a major ordeal to get those wrecks out of the mess.

Exactly what happened this time remains vague, although a full month has passed since the assumingly Friday morning incident. Uncertain exactly what to do initially, so followed common knowledge advice and called 911.

Phone answerer said the sheriff had been informed and law enforcement was on the way. With a tight morning appointment schedule decision was made to let officials take care of the matter.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Teeth sure are important

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“There’s a cavity in a wisdom tooth that needs to be filled before it gets worse.”

That was the dentist’s conclusion after extensive once-every-five-year’s x-rays and accompanying exam.

“Ugh.” Going to the dentist is dreaded enough and then such a report brings to reality the reason why.

There have definitely been plenty of lifetime experiences in those offices starting as a youngster. Included was a year of attempted straightening in ’65, although it didn’t do much good.

Yet, in actuality there are still plenty of positive aspects to negative sides of regular dental checkups. Teeth are essential to easy chewing food.

At least most of these are the original ones, with a few cosmetic enhancements after losing a front smiler. It was four decades ago when that untrained stallion went over backwards stirrup, hitting rider in the mouth.

Certainly not much personal wisdom, but having the tooth is different than many acquaintances who don’t. There have been stories about being forced to have that back fang removed, causing nearly unbearable pain to the toughest.

Always intending to brush regularly, it’s not been followed stringently and certainly not the extent of some. Have had coworkers and seen others who publicly bring out the teeth cleaning tool after nearly every bite.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Handicap no life setback

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Now, Keith quit that. Robert what are you doing? You boys better settle down.”

Actually that’s probably not exactly how Sandy said it, but certainly semblance.

That was every Saturday afternoon in the mid ’60s. Mom and the boys did grocery shopping while dad Billy generally went to the weekly sale barn auction.

Came to mind with passing of longtime friend Keith Bacon. Others may not have such vivid recollection of those days, while remaining fond reflections for one former grocery carryout boy.

Typical of Four Mile community farm families, the hardworking Bacons had diversified cropping and livestock operations. Keith and Robert were rambunctious farm boys who didn’t get to town very often.

One wouldn’t know it on the forefront and certainly not let on by him or any of his family. Keith had an incurable disease in joints forcing hospitalization in an urban hospital as a newborn.

Despite what most would consider serious handicap, Keith’s parents were determined the boy live a “normal life.” Nobody was to feel sorry for Keith or him for himself, and no shirking of any farm chores and responsibilities.

That became Keith’s definitely expressed always pleasant energetic positive attitude for life appreciated and respected completely by younger brother Robert.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Retiring friend amply appreciated

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Hello. Kelly Lenz suggested we call you to come and work for the radio.”

Of course, Kelly had been a longtime friend in the media business and had assisted with personal ranch event promotions.

The surprising opportunity call came exactly a decade ago four days after being fired from previous employment. Assistant farm director Greg Akagi heard that personally defeating news, sharing it with Kelly who made recommendation to radio management.

Initially taken aback, first reaction was quite indecisiveness, yet with prodding interview was scheduled and before long a new job.

It must all be credited to now even closer friend and daily work cohort Kelly Lenz. There’ve been a number of airwave and print reports in recent days about Kelly’s retirement as a farm broadcaster.

That’s after a remarkable career serving agriculture around the world for nearly half a century with 41 years in Kansas.

Mention the name Kelly Lenz anywhere and eyes immediately light up appreciatively, recognizing Kelly for his knowledge and engaging congeniality. That’s from every local farm and ranch home to state, national and worldwide agriculture and political affiliations.

More than four decades Kelly was up at 4 o’clock, soon live on the radio reporting analyzing agriculture news and markets. Leaders in every phase of the industry, government programs and decision making were interviewed willingly trusting sharing with Kelly.

Help House News: Goodbye summer, hello fall

By Raylene Quaney

Saying goodbye to summer, Help House thanks everyone that has contributed in one way or another to help make this another successful summer. Beginning with our huge garage sale in June, the Summer Fan Club, the school supplies give away and our very popular silent auctions, we have been very busy. The Summer Fan Club gave out 49 fans. School supplies were given out to 85 children who did not have an opportunity to sign up with ECKAN or receive supplies from Grace Community Church or other school supply resources for the upcoming school year.

The silent auction donors and winning bidders raised $1,205.51 at Melvern Sunflower Days, and $2,788.18 on Aug. 10, during the Overbrook Osage County Fair. These are our two largest fundraisers of the year and will help provide food for about three months for the more than 200 families that depend on the Help House food pantry to supplement their nutritional needs each month.

The crocheted flag, made and donated by Peggy Kampsen, was raffled off and the winner drawn during the Overbrook fair. The winner was Louise Michael, of Topeka. A total of $884.00 was raised through this very gracious gift. We thank you for helping your Osage County neighbors.

Clean, gently worn coats needed

Help House’s next effort for assistance is the sixth annual coat drive and giveaway. We began taking donations for clean and gently worn coats on Sept. 3. Infants and children’s coats are always in short supply, so if your children have coats they have outgrown but are still in good condition, please consider sharing with another child who may not have a coat for this winter. We also need men’s and women’s coats in all sizes. Also coveralls or overalls for those who have to work outside in the weather, and hats and gloves for everyone. The coat closet will be open Oct. 1-31, during regular business hours.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Early start to longevity

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Passing his farmhouse nearly every morning Monday through Friday, 6:30 to 7:15, for 48 years, he was always up working.

“Returning home, each of those days he was still going strong every afternoon 5:15 to 5:45.”

In the past month, his car wasn’t always in the garage, morning lights weren’t on, he wasn’t apparent at work.

Then the story was printed in the hometown weekly, personal hero Leroy Fechner passed away at 95 years of age.

At such admirable maturity passing probably shouldn’t be too unexpected but the news sent cringing recoil.

The lifelong bachelor cattleman, former renowned quality seed stock breeder merchandizer, conservation-minded crop grower, most ambitious, twinkling-eyed farmer seemed insurmountable.

One felt he’d surely live forever, and probably Leroy’s opinion was likewise such – whenever visiting conversation centered on future plans.

There’d been a couple setbacks in the past decade or so with body injury from farm-ranch work. Seriously out of commission at times forced to live away from his lifetime home some, Leroy always returned.

Back full force ahead, Leroy was checking cows, feeding backgrounders, operating farm equipment, driving slowly down the highway ranchland gazing.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Congenial service is appreciated

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Greenbacks are the best way to do business.”

The old boss insisted that paper money is the safest and most accurate way to handle payment and receipt transactions.

That was probably 40 years ago the comment was made. Certainly, the truly smart man always had a billfold seeming full of folding bills to buy our Monday dinner.

Have remembered the statement occasionally through time, it definitely came back after a recent horseshow. Headed out of town, the gas gauge was below half as pulled into the filling station. Sure didn’t want to run out and have to ride one horse and lead the other to the ranch.

Heart sank when pulled the billfold out of the glovebox and there was no credit card. Of course, the first thing running through the mind was “What happened to it?”

Couldn’t remember last time it was used or where could have lost it. But, realization soon dawned the biggest immediate concern was paying for pickup gasoline.

Unlike the former employer, cash hasn’t been a form of paying for much of anything for several decades. Seems like if there happens to be any real hard dough readily available it’s usually spent for something unnecessary.

However, oddly and coincidently this time a twenty dollar bill was folded up in the hideaway.

Actually paying for gasoline with cash isn’t even that easy to do anymore. Most clerks get a concerned look whenever currency is brought out to pay for anything.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Maturity changes romantic passions

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Been there, done that and no real desire to do it again.”

While philosophy has long been that people never change, they actually can and do in some ways.

What was formerly a “romance,” although some folks don’t understand that terminology preferably describing such as a “passion,” can become unimportant. That is, not completely irrelevant yet certainly unnecessary and unessential for a happy life.

There can be endeavors with such heartfelt attachment one feels they can’t or wouldn’t really want to live without. Yet in reality “this too shall pass” as “time changes everything.”

Forever desiring to be a cowboy in every positive definition of such, certain characteristics just automatically become part of it.

After getting that first horse, a mare, not atypical to many, she was mated and raised a foal. Over four decades that meager beginning developed into a major horse breeding program. Never raising 40 colts a year, the operation approached that level to become known, with demand for production. It was a “romance.”

A Cowboy’s Faith: Fast horse just excited

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“How come your horse is so wild?”

The teenage cowgirl operating the entrance gate at the horseshow asked seriously, perhaps as a courtesy, with concern.

Taken back by the question, initially offended, second thoughts realized it was legitimate query.

Still as the quite mature palomino gelding Cody of Trigger-semblance high stepped eagerly through the gate, response likely seemed rude.

“He’s not wild. He’s a great horse who knows his job. He is trained to run barrel races, loves doing it and is anxious to get started.”

That was an accurate reply said with heartfelt belief and most appreciation.

Yet, none of the other perhaps 100 different horses entering the gate had the enthusiasm of the old cowboy’s horse. So the golden horse with white mane and tail is a “little wild.”

However, put the pleasure horse bridle and martingale on the speedster and ride in the arena before the show. He’s pretty calm, collected, might even get an eight or nine out of 10 given a score.

Always entered in the stock horse pleasure division to help keep his jitters down, ole Cody’s adrenalin still builds. Actually, the horse is just too doggone smart, maybe smart-alecky would be more accurate.

Anyway prancing through the typically slow moving pleasure riders attracts the judge’s attention. Certainly enough bad notice to never get the rider’s Number 17 on the placing card.

Take the big homebred gelding to the pasture for rancher’s work he just doesn’t understand what it’s all about. That’s despite geneticists evaluating his pedigree above average cow horse lineage.

Help House offers help for students without school supplies

Help House is now giving out school supplies to those who have not received them from other agencies or sources.

Those who need school supplies are asked to bring the supplies list from their school to Help House, 131 W. 15th St., Lyndon, Kan. Hours are 4-7 p.m. Mondays and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesday through Friday.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Correct tightness means safety

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Watch out, your girth broke.”

That was the initial sideline scream from more than one at conclusion of a good pole bending run.

“Get off before your saddle turns and you fall off.” Sincere concerned advice came from the gateman.

Confused by all the goings-on, glance down to the saddle billet verified it was gone. Only the back cinch was loosely intact holding saddle on the high-withered old Palomino Cody.

Cautious dismount was made to ground safety as the saddle remained upright for evaluation of what the whole predicament entailed.

It was a weird deal, really, although the front cinch had been tightened to the usual hole. However, evidently as the fast lean horse stretched out on the straightaway home, the girth became loose enough to unhook itself.

A spectator congenially picked the off-billet up out of the arena and brought it to the trailer. Nothing was broken period, as the back cinch, centered rider and the horse’s back kept saddle upright.

Luckily no tack had to be repaired, but the girth was definitely pulled one hole tighter for the next run. It’s even been taken up another notch after a couple runs.

Pulling the cinch is the most important part of saddling up. Such a simple action it would seem. But actually getting the right snugness to suit the horse, the rider and the expectations are somewhat complex.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas