Category Archives: Notions

A Cowboy’s Faith: Blessings of the rain

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Rain makes the grass grow.”

That’s good from every regard, way better than the opposite.

“When have the crops looked any better in the second week of August?”

Appreciating the sufficient rains on the home front, another rancher just 30 miles down the highway instantly contradicted. “We really do need a rain.”

Weather analysis not particularly disgruntled or even disagreeing always brings comment. It depends on locale, certainly. A field just down the road from another might have a bumper crop, compared to mediocrity.

Semblance, overall majority of crops appear lush driving by, but it’s not always the accurate picture. Several days earlier when temperature exceeded 100 degrees, curling plant leaves were most apparent. Yields undoubtedly hampered, although difficult to calculate extent.

Date of planting has direct influence on grain in the bin. Date of rains, temperature during stage of growth, it’s all left up to the power of nature. Just a few days make the difference between profits, loss.

Native grass in most pastures seen daily truly is stirrup high on a 16-hand horse. Even those intensely grazed generally have comeback of lush green, ample to turn more cattle out.

As importantly, ponds are full, many overflowing the spillway. Creeks running, as draws and wet weather seeps supply water, too.

Depending when and where, tame hay tonnage set records, as other was reported average, even low.

Building of distinction still graces Burlingame; old school now repository of local history

By Paul Schmidt

This distinct brick building built in 1902 served as Burlingame’s grade school for 99 years. Now called the Schuyler Museum, it is a repository of local, county, Santa Fe Trail, railroad, and mining history. The museum is named after Phillip Church Schuyler (1805-1872), a prominent settler, politician and reformer, who in 1855 purchased a large land claim that eventually became the town of Burlingame. The school-turned-museum is at 117 S. Dacotah St., in Burlingame. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Photos thanks to Paul Schmidt.

Hidden History: Homesteaders lay foundation for Osage County’s future

A cornerstone carved by William S. White reminds of the connection of the home’s past owners to its current inhabitants.

By Wendi Bevitt

Every home has a story. It is a standing memorial of the people that have lived and loved within its walls – each family tailoring it to meet their tastes and needs.

One Osage County family is seeing to preserve the original details that were lovingly added to their century-year-old home.

Michael and Sara Floyd bought their rural Osage County, Kan., home and 4.5 acres in 2014, and the home and barn were in much need of some love and attention. It is the Floyds’ goal to restore both structures back to their former glory.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Doing what’s most important

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“It’s impossible to be everywhere at the same time.”

Something has to give, and it’s a major decision deciding which that’s going to be. More so, determining the one of many things wanted to do in a day.

What is the most important? Whatever selected means missing out on all of the others. Always in the busy life conflicts arise among opportunities.

It seems to strike harder than ever as calendar schedule overflows the lines. Life was supposed to be simpler in maturity, but opposite it’s become.

Reality of that has definitely moved to forefront in recent days. With a fulltime off-ranch job to assure bills are paid, evenings and weekends are packed with catchup chores.

Add to the complexity, so many “social” activities one desires to partake. Saturday, there were two “important” horse shows that needed to be participated in for valuable yearend points.

After serious deliberation determination made to attend the one with most events, efficiently using horse, rider, dollars, and time. Just “gave the winnings” to the competition at the other show, because couldn’t be there to try to beat them.

Lyndon Leaders invite sunflower lovers to enjoy the summer bloom

Photo of last year’s sunflowers by Darlene Bogren.

By Leanne Shoup, Club Reporter

Calling all sunflower lovers! The Lyndon Leaders 4-H Club’s sunflower field is progressing faster than we thought. We think the flowers will be in full bloom by the second weekend in August.

As with the club’s sunflower project last year, everyone is invited to stop by the field and look at the sunflowers in bloom. To reach the field, from the junction of U.S. 56 and U.S. 75 (Four Corners), go four miles south on U.S. 75 to 189th Street; the field is northwest of the intersection. The sunflowers will be easily visible from U.S. 75, but do not park on the highway. Please pull off on the gravel road, 189th Street, and enjoy.

The club decided that all donations from the sunflower field will go to Garrett McCoy, a Lyndon high school senior who recently suffered from a brain aneurism. Club members thank all who support Garrett and the 4-H club.

Rip roarin’ fair fun at Overbrook

Photo by Tod Bevitt

An excited crowd enjoyed fire-breathing and smoke-bellowing farm implements during Thursday night’s tractor pull at the Overbrook Osage County Fair. The fair continues Friday and Saturday. Arena entertainment includes Friday night’s ATV races and Saturday night’s UTV races and demolition derby theatre. The fair parade, with the theme “Country Pride County Wide” begins at 6 p.m. Saturday in downtown Overbrook; lineup by 5:30 p.m. See the full schedule here.

SOS announces Osage County “SOS Strong” men

While most men are not violent in their relationships, SOS believes a single aggressor is one too many. With this in mind, “SOS Strong” was established to build lasting relationships and improve community awareness.  “SOS Strong” is a team of 20 men dedicated to helping SOS stop domestic violence and child abuse by raising $1,000 each to support each of our four SOS programs.

Nominated as “SOS Strong” members for Osage County were Darrel Finch and Jeff King, who will strive to reach a $1,000 fundraising goal between now and August 24, 2017.

This all-male fundraiser was founded to highlight positive role models and to remind our youth men are far more than stereotypical abusers, controllers and runaway fathers. Because most learned behaviors are acquired during our most formative years, children need reassurance and guidance from compassionate, caring men. The community as a whole needs to see that abuse is not just a woman’s problem, it’s everyone’s problem.

Each “SOS Strong” member took a pledge to lead by example, to never blame victims, to be a positive up-stander rather than a willing bystander, to not engage in any acts of violence, to stand-up for someone in need, and to always use his voice to speak up for what is right. When men are strong in character and lead by conviction, so are our families, schools and streets. 

A Cowboy’s Faith: Demand despite industry changes

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Hogs are mortgage lifters for farmers.”

That philosophy commonplace in agriculture for decades has changed. The fact came to mind during a hog show at the county fair.

Most farming operations included hog production for many years. It was because hogs generally earned some profit when other aspects of agriculture were losing money.

Nearly every farm had hogs, chickens and milk cows in the first half of the previous century. While poultry and dairy became specialized quicker, hogs remained on many farms longer. Now they’re much fewer and farther between.

Even if there weren’t larger numbers, many farmers kept a few sows to raise pigs. They’d either sell them as feeders or finish to market weight. Others specialized in buying and growing the pigs, perhaps considered easier than farrowing.

Hog enterprises appeared so enhancive in the final quarter of the previous century that many farmers built elaborate facilities. Some reaped good profits for several years. Others soon found demands to produce pigs’ profitability far less glamorous than those selling buildings claimed.

The industry’s changed completely. Vast majority of pork today is produced by “corporate hog factories.” Similarities to any other workplace except caring for live animals from mating through dinner plate. Well almost, as processing is still separate entity for most hog production.

Summer on the Marais des Cygnes

Lazing on the banks of the Marais des Cygnes River is a perfect way to spend the dog days of summer.

By Paul Schmidt

Viewed here from Melvern’s Riverfront Trail, the Marais des Cygnes River has a rich history dating back to the French trappers who named it (Marais des Cygnes translated to English is “marsh of the swan”). Melvern’s Riverfront Park and Trail includes a scenic five-mile expanse of diverse terrain that winds along river bottom and wetlands. In addition to its scenic river access, the park is an Osage County treasure of native Kansas grassland animal and plant life.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Living to the fullest

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“You can’t take it with you.”

That comment comes to mind again with recent passing of a college judging team mate.

“Live life to the fullest. One never knows when it’s coming to an end on Earth.”

Another repeated remark hits home when 20 percent in a class of 100 have already gone beyond.

“Checked the obituaries again today and name wasn’t there, so still alive.”

One more observation heard on occasion.

Morbid as might be, second page death reports generally the first thing read in the daily newspaper.

Tongue and cheek, not actually checking for own announcement as such. Yet, as lifelong newsman with bred-in nosiness, truly am interested in those who have died.

Sadly too many are acquaintances. Plus always like to learn about others’ stories, big timers, and especially the common folk.

Still, date of birth is always of special note. Those who’ve lived into their 80s, 90s and 100s are true inspiration.

Why are they different? Did they eat better? Exercise more? Work harder? Is it in their genes? One wonders?

Of greater alarm is the number of those dying who aren’t even yet 65. Almost every day, there are some. Many don’t reach what as a retiree one could consider “maturity.” Cause of passing is notable, and if not reported question arises, why?

Then, when it’s a child, teenager or young adult, there’s even more intense grief. How come? They have missed so very much here.

Consumer Corner: Know your rights with door-to-door sales

By Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt

Our office always sees a spike in complaints about salespeople at the door during the summer months. Many different products and services are sold door-to-door, but in particular, home improvement services are much more prevalent during the summer.

Kansas law offers consumers a number of rights when it comes to transactions made at your doorstep.

Three-day right to cancel: This rule says that for any purchase of more than $25 made at your home, or any location that is not the seller’s permanent place of business or local address, you have three days after the purchase is made to change your mind. The seller must give you written and verbal notice of this right to cancel and contact information if you choose to exercise your right to cancel. It is also suggested you send this cancellation by certified mail so you can track it. Companies are then required to refund the customer’s money within 10 days of receiving the cancellation.

Five-day check cashing rule: If you pay for a door-to-door sale with a check, the seller is not allowed to cash or deposit that check until five business days have passed since the transaction. This is to give you a chance to exercise your three-day right to cancel. Because of this rule, it’s especially important to never pay for a door-to-door sale in cash, since it becomes impossible to exercise this option to cancel the transaction and stop payment on the check.

Contract requirements: The contract or receipt must be dated, show the name and address of the seller, be in a large legible font and explain your right to cancel. The contract or receipt must be in the same language used in the sales presentation.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Kid remains in cowboy

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“You need to act your age.”

Uncertain exactly how that comment was meant to be interpreted? So, it was taken as a compliment.

Doesn’t really matter, but likely referred to being in every horseshow class could get in.

Even those where most entries were young sprouts, especially compared to wannabe’s maturity.

Expense to get to a competition so great; philosophy is to participate in everything.

It takes a long while for things to soak in a thick head. Mom always encouraged, “ride in pleasure.” Never did, with excuse: “Nellie won’t back.”

Really didn’t even realize horses were supposed to be in a certain “lead”; hardly knew what “gait” was. Thought if horse could walk, trot, canter on command, was doing pretty doggone good.

Story out of school here, hadn’t heard the word “lead” until after first professionally judged horseshow years later. For unknowing, “lead” is “which set of legs, left or right, leads or advances forward when a horse is cantering, the same as loping, or galloping.” The horse has more coordinated balance in the correct lead.

Anyway, now do what Mom said to do: “Ride in every class.” Some shows that’s 25 events.

“All on one horse?” somebody asked. No, two. One for “performance” classes, a misnomer word in itself, and another for “speed” events, self-explanatory.

Hidden History: Sac and Fox orphan ensures record of tribes’ life in Osage County

Julia Goodell, right, and her adopted daughter Fannie Baker both made their marks on the Sac and Fox tribes’ history in Osage County.

By Wendi Bevitt

Prior to their removal to Kansas around 1845, the Sac (or Sauk) and Fox tribes were located in Iowa. Most often they are mentioned together, but had originally been two distinct groups.

During the 1700s, French attacks on the Foxes (the Fox Wars of 1712 to 1733) in the Great Lakes Region caused the two tribes to join forces and form a close alliance that helped to affect unification.

The Sac and Fox reservation in Kansas was 435,200 acres located at the headwaters of the Osage River, the first agency being in Franklin County. In 1859, the agency was moved into Osage County, at Quenemo, with Perry Fuller (former employer of Frank James) as agent. The agency also employed an interpreter, John Goodell, to assist in government negotiations with the tribe.

John Goodell was of European descent and raised in New York. He became familiar with the language and customs of the Indians, and served as an interpreter for the government in both Iowa and Kansas.

In 1840, Goodell married Julia Mitchell. Julia was a member of the Sac and Fox tribes and was a survivor of the Black Hawk War. This war was an attempt by Sauk leader Black Hawk to lead the Sauk and associated tribes to resettle lands in Illinois that had been ceded by the tribes in an 1804 treaty. Finding a place to call home that was both acceptable to the tribe and the government was something that would plague the tribe continuously, and translating during these negotiations was the main responsibility for John Goodell.

John and Julia Goodell’s home at the Quenemo agency was an asylum for orphans, the sick, and needy. They adopted twins Fannie and Isaac Baker, children of Indian trader Isaac Baker and his Fox wife, who died after their birth. Mr. Baker pursued the fur trade, and eventually became a prominent banker in St. Louis, Mo.

In 1859, the Sac and Fox tribe paid for Fannie and a handful of other young people, including the daughter of the Indian agent, to attend Baker University. Baker University was the first college in Kansas territory having opened in 1858. Perry Fuller, the Sac and Fox Agency representative, was also living in Baldwin City at the time.

Sen. Moran’s decision blocks vote on Senate healthcare bill

Statement by U.S. Senator Jerry Moran on his opposition to the Better Care Reconciliation Act:

On Monday evening I announced my opposition to the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) the Senate healthcare bill. This and an earlier version of the BCRA missed the mark for Kansans. The BCRA neither adequately repealed or replaced Obamacare. It was drafted behind closed doors and without committee hearings.

After my decision, the Majority Leader set aside the BCRA and announced his plan to have the Senate vote on a bill that repeals the Affordable Care Act, effective in two years.

If the bill is adopted it would establish an expiration date for Obamacare and set the stage for a full legislative process expert witnesses, public hearings, amendments and votes by all one hundred senators.

I would work to craft healthcare policy that provides less government involvement in healthcare decisions, greater personal choice, protection for pre-existing conditions, increased access and lower costs. I recognize that decisions made regarding healthcare have real consequences for Kansans and their families. We need a thoughtful and less political process. 

Help House will be your fan if you donate a fan

Summer heat is here, help someone stay cool

By Raylene Quaney

There has been more than 30 households sign up to receive fans, however donations have been down this summer and we have only been able to give out 22 to date. There is a lot of hot weather left during July and August, so if you can donate either a new fan or make cash donations to purchase a fan for someone, please mail your donation to Help House, PO Box 356, Lyndon KS 66451; please note “Fan Club” in memo.

United Way donations can help locally

Jamie Reever, with United Way, attended the Help House board meeting on July 11. Last year’s United Way campaign raised $582,000. They will begin this year’s campaign in two weeks. The United Way of the Flint Hills serves eight counties. Help House is blessed to be a recipient of United Way funds that can be used to purchase food for the food pantry as well as other emergency services.

Did you know that if you work in Shawnee County and contribute to the United Way through your employer that you may mark on your contribution slip that you want the contribution to go to Help House in Osage County? It will then process through the United Way of the Flint Hills and back to Help House. The employer matching funds will remain in Shawnee County, but your part will come back to Osage County to help out locally.

Fill the barrel, summer food drive

A countywide food drive through Harvester’s is being held July 15-July 22. Look for the large blue barrels at each of the three Thriftway grocery stores, in Carbondale, Overbrook and Osage City, during the week. While you are shopping if you could pick up just one or two non-perishable food items and drop them in the barrel on your way out, your neighbor in need would be most grateful. All donations will go to the Help House food pantry.

Participants revel in summertime fun during 2017 Osage County Fair parade

Conklin Plumbing was splish-splashing while taking a bath on their first place float in the 2017 Osage County Fair parade.

The annual Osage County Fair parade, sponsored by the Osage City Chamber of Commerce, was Thursday, June 29, 2017. The theme for the parade this year was “Summertime Fun”.

Diane Michael, parade chairman, coordinated a variety of entries including the mounted color guard and 1st Division Infantry Band from Ft. Riley, Boy Scouts, emergency vehicles, including the city and county law enforcement, ambulance and fire department, parade marshal Ann Lusk, and Mr. and Mrs. Osage City Richard and Jeanette Swarts, floats, golf carts and ATVs, band, politicians, and horses.

The float entry awards were presented as follows: Conklin Plumbing, first place, $125; Friends of Pomona State Park, Going Retro, second place, $100; RCIL, third place, $75; Osage City Middle School cheerleaders, fourth place, $50. The golf cart and ATV entry awards went to: Osage City-Great Life Golf Course, first place, $30; Jody Lohmeyer Stark, State Farm Insurance, second place, $20; First National Bank of Osage City, third place, $10. The high school band competition first place prize of $100 was presented to  the Osage City High School band.

As Diane Michael stated, we are hoping that next year there will be more involvement of floats, school bands, etc., thus there will be have a larger parade for 2018. Your support contributes to the growth of our community.

The Osage City Chamber of Commerce and Diane Michael, parade committee chairman thanked those that participated in the 2017 Osage County Fair parade and noted everyone that attended seemed to have a good time and enjoyed the entries.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Tire blowout no catastrophe

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“It wasn’t just flat on one side.”

There was barely a shred of rubber showing anywhere on the wheel rim.

Already going six-miles-an-hour under the speed limit, honking from behind wasn’t initially heeded. Intrusive blaring continuing; whippersnappers with big ornery grins pointed to the attached trailer while whizzing by.

Still unaware of what was wrong, an intersection not far ahead allowed stopping place for the checkup. Finally obvious, the left trailer tire rubber had been destroyed as highway was grinding on the rim.

Uncertain how much earlier the blowout occurred, but an extended time, for sure.

The 12-foot, single-axle stock trailer used for hauling show horses was bought new six years ago. Typically taking two horses, sometimes one, occasionally three, it’s been a number of miles.

Inflated rubber tires always go flat sometime, but it was the first one on this trailer.

There was a spare, still no comprehensible way to get it changed. There is a jack and wrench someplace, but uncertain where in the pickup.

Notwithstanding frequent derogatory comments about cell phones, sure glad had one that worked.

4-H club leads community in “Tiger spirit” with downtown wall project

Lyndon Leaders 4-H Club members and Prayer and Action team members work together to create a small “Tiger spirit” pocket park in downtown Lyndon. Courtesy photo.

By Leanne Shoup
Club Reporter

Despite a busy fair season, the Lyndon Leaders 4-H Club paired up with the Prayer and Action team that was visiting Osage County this summer. It has been a club goal to help beautify and give back to the community, and with the help of the Prayer and Action volunteers, the club was able to get its wall project well underway. For three days they spent preparing the ground, laying pavers and painting a wall on Topeka Avenue in Lyndon.

The best part about the project was being able to meet and interact with the volunteers. These volunteers were high school-aged Catholics, who devoted a week to help serve others and grow in their faith. The students were from various parishes, ranging from the Kansas City area and even Chicago.

After hearing of their mission, the Lyndon Leader 4-H Club reached out to them. Due to the club having so many young members, they needed the extra muscle to help with their ambitious project. Generously, the Prayer and Action team agreed to team up with the club, and now citizens of the Lyndon community can enjoy the fruits of their labor for many years to come.

There are still a few things left to do before the wall project is complete. Final plans are to put in landscaping to show Lyndon Tiger spirit.

Forgotten bridge spans the flow of time

By Paul Schmidt

The remains of an abandoned Pratt through-truss, five-panel, pin-connected bridge still spans the Dragoon Creek near Burlingame, Kan. Built in 1899 by the Kansas City Bridge Company, only its strong frame survives. It is one of many old surviving bridges that add character and intrigue to Osage County. Details of this bridge were provided by Bridgehunter.com – a site devoted to documenting historic and notable bridges of the U.S. 

A Cowboy’s Faith: Modern hay methods leisurelier

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Life’s easier in maturity.”

Of course, many disagree emphatically, and there are plenty of downsides certainly.

However, when it comes to hay season, there’s sure lots less labor required than half century plus ago.

Well, first off, a younger generation is in charge of the task. If the hay doesn’t get put up, it’s their fault – definitely not getting in the way.

Never had the ability to do much except lug the square bales, and tried the best to get out of that whenever could. Haven’t lifted a single bale this year, and won’t because the small square baling is completed.

As with majority of today’s producers, bulk of the hay goes into big round bales. It’s much easier and more convenient all the way around.

Still reflect having no baler, mowing with a seven-foot sickle mower, and operating a dump rake. After grass dried, manpowered-pitchforks went to work piling hay onto the pickup.

To the shed, it was pitched off and into stacks. Never was but only a few acres, yet enough to know the hard work required in large haying operations.

Work slackened when a small square twine baler was acquired. However, for years there was no hay wagon, let alone an accumulator and frontend tractor loader for stacking.

Bales were dropped on the ground while pickup followed behind and each bale loaded manually onto it. Many times that was one man driving, stopping, loading and going to the next bale.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Modernization in communication, conversation

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Technology demands are cause for stomping the floor, pounding the desk, maybe even screaming.”

No end to it seemingly from every direction and no clue what much of the modern-rigmarole is all about.

Telephones have become outdated, according to logic of many, family included. Email works for some, yet already “old hat,” too. “Just text me” is becoming common reference to making personal contacts.

Very grudgingly, effort has been made to learn that “messaging” system. It seemed to work with son, grandson, a couple others.

Then corruption approached vulgarity when 15 “texts” of unknown numbers, were on the cell phone.

No idea who they were from or what they were about, no findable-messages.

Worry prevented anything else from being accomplished so just gave up and started calling each of the 10 digits.

After figuring out who some were, with guidance from knowledgeable coworker, names were punched into cell phone for future.

Worse thing about dilemma was an important meeting the night before was missed. But, younger board members got the “text” and attended.

From now on, every “text” received is going to be called unless “message” is clearly stated.

After hearing “it’s on Facebook” many times, also finally gave into that one of several “social media” invitations, too. It was fun at first signing up hundreds of “friends.”

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas