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Thank you from the family of Janat Coleen Rice

The family of Janat Coleen Rice would like to say a heartfelt thanks to all the kind folks who helped make the loss of this special, beloved woman a little easier. The staff of Sunset Manor provided compassionate and loving care not only to our mother, but also to our family during the difficult last days of her life. Our hospice nurse, Stephany, was invaluable in helping Mom feel more comfortable and supporting all of us. We also thank Pastor Joshua McCrarey for his visits and prayers.

There are many people who assisted in the memorial services. Reverend Terry Bullock listened to our memories and put together a touching and personal tribute to Mom’s life. The church community women of Melvern served a delicious meal and the opportunity for our family to be together. It was comforting to see all those who attended her services. This meant so much to us, and Mom would have been pleased. We received many warm condolences, cards, flowers, and memorial contributions. Last, but not least, Marty Feltner, of Feltner’s Funeral Home, was with us throughout this process, responding to our every request with patience and compassion. This kindness from all of you will be remembered by our family and we are forever thankful.

We will miss this wonderful woman more than we can say, but know that she smiles down upon us and is humbly grateful to all the friends and family that blessed her life.

Steve and Debbie Rice and family
Rhonda and Bob Knoernschild and family
Nancy and Bruce Carselowey and family
Jerry and Pam Rice and family
Danny and Terry Rice and family

Eat Well to Be Well: Take practical steps for improving poor digestion

Life is usually good when our gut feels good – no bloating, diarrhea, gas or constipation. But when those symptoms rear their ugly head, and for many they do, suddenly your happy-go-lucky life has just taken a turn down the wrong road.

Having a gut that works like a charm the majority, if not all of the time, is one of life’s most valuable health assets. When tummy troubles are under control, we can enjoy life much more. Luckily, good gut health and the ability to digest what we eat without worry can be achieved by most of us when specific steps are taken.

Causes of poor digestion

There can be several reasons why we may experience poor digestion. Here are some common ones many may have:

  • Taking too many over-the-counter medications or prescription drugs.
  • Sedentary lifestyle.
  • Tooth decay and gum disease.
  • Drinking too much alcohol.
  • Eating too many sugary foods and beverages or refined carbohydrates.
  • Too much “bad” bacteria instead of “good” bacteria.
  • Stress.
  • Environmental contaminants.

Signs of poor digestion

Many of us associate poor digestion with the typical symptoms of bloating, gassiness, constipation, or diarrhea. But poor gut health can make itself known by causing other symptoms outside of our abdomen, such as joint pain, unexplained headaches, fibromyalgia, skin problems, sleep disturbances, and fatigue.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Bulls must romance cows

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Cows will never have a calf if they don’t have intimate lovemaking with a bull.”

For a cowherd to make profits for a ranch, cows must have calves.

All the long-drawn-out discussions about bull performance data, pedigree and production ability are fine and good. They are important, but the most essential ingredient is that the bull gets cows bred.

On the forefront, it sounds simple, but many factors come into the equation for this to happen.

Most importantly, the bull must be fertile. Just because a bull sired a pasture full of calves on the ground this spring doesn’t mean anything now. Many things could have happened since the bull bred cows last year, and he has become infertile.

A bull may have been injured by the last cow he mated. Injuries to his breeding system could have occurred while fighting with other cattle. An accident could have injured the bull while grazing rough pasture terrain.

Freezing cold winter temperatures can have negative impact on a bull’s breeding soundness. The list goes on and on.

So, every bull going out with cows to be bred to raise calves must have a breeding soundness check. That is easier said than done.

Bulls must be rounded up for a qualified veterinarian to do the examination. Most bulls do not like the procedure, which certain people might even consider inhumane, but it is required.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Grasslands endure despite transition

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Method of transporting cattle has sure changed considerably in the past century.”

Railroad cattle cars arrived at Kansas cowtowns before daylight as Flint Hills cowboys were mounted on horseback ready to work.

Mixed colored, big, thin, long yearling steers from Texas rambled out of the train cars into the stockyards.

Real working cowboys on real working cow horses calmly moved the typically a bit renegade, often longhorns out the gate.

It was a 30-mile, sometimes longer, cattle drive through vast just turning green Flint Hills to their summer home.

Never has it been publicly recorded any cowboys got lost enroute or returning in the wide-open prairie without direction signs.

Oh, how times have changed. Today, semi loads of cattle, some from Texas but from many other places beyond, arrive at the big pastures.

A portable chute is there for ease of unloading cattle after their long ride. Often just one cowboy, sometimes even without a horse, carefully counts the summer grazers off the long double-decker truck.

Nowadays, the younger, shapelier, more muscular, lightweight cattle may just graze for a few months. Many will come off the pastures in July instead of October like it used to be.

A Cowboy’s Faith: More than opening gate

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“It’s grass time; open the gate and turn them out.”

That’s the way it was for most farmers many years gone by. Today, there’s usually a lot more to preparing cattle for summer pasture than just unlatching the barnyard corral.

Some ranchers still do the work with horses and lariat ropes but majority of today’s cattlemen have working faculties. It’s not as true Western romantic but more efficient and likely less stress on both cattle and cowboys.

Most cow-calf operators have cattle identified by numbered ear tags, so the right calf must be with their own mama. While families generally stay together, that is not always the case. Youngsters sometimes wander to play around with other calves and must be sorted out from playmates for that motherly love.

Certain ranchers tag heifer calves in a certain ear, left or right, and male babies in the opposite. Likewise, depending on management philosophy, cows with heifer calves might be pastured separately from those with boys.

Every calf must have specific health treatments varying according to the operation. Generally, there are a couple of neck pokes vaccinations, one on each side of the neck, Insecticide treatment is often applied in some form whether pour-on, dust or a fly tag in the untagged ear.

The little boys have it tougher than their mates as they usually become steers by a cowboy’s surgery skills. Implants became a popular growth stimulant several years ago but are controversial today with some believers and other none users. Typically, heifer calves never received a pound-increasing incentive in their ears but that was not always the case either.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Forever changing weather uncontrollable

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“In the spring, I have counted 136 kinds of weather inside of 24 hours.”

Mark Twain said it originally but the comment has been repeated in wide variations during recent weeks.

The temperature can be far above average almost like summer and within minutes near freezing or below. It is calm and still when starting to chore in the morning, then wind blasts seemingly 60 miles per hour when finished.

Those who have planted early spring gardens have been mad to say the least. Often when the sun shines, sky is blue, temperature is short-sleeve-shirt, gardeners till and plant. New sprouts peak through the soil, and then the weatherman says: “It’ll freeze tonight.”

Gardeners scamper to protect the vulnerable new plantings. Potted plants are taken inside as sheets, blankets, feed sacks, everything imaginable are used to cover rest of the garden.

Depending on how low the thermometer gets, some plants generally survive while majority are destroyed. With gardeners’ grunts and groans, there’s something about putting another new seed in the ground that gives felling of optimism.

Of course, this time of year, every farmer has the itch to get in the field. While modern corn varieties are colder weather resistant, chance of freezing still exists. Dry conditions and low night temperatures have kept corn plantings below average.

Eat Well to Be Well Recipe: Oven-Roasted Lemon Parmesan Asparagus

Effortless, this side dish bursts with delicious hints of lemon, garlic, and Parmesan when perfectly paired with asparagus. Here’s a recipe that brings out the best in this perennial veggie by roasting. Easy and quick to make and tastes incredibly good, this recipe you’ll use again and again. Roasting strong-tasting vegetables like asparagus caramelizes the flavor, reducing its natural bitterness. Even the pickiest of eaters will find a liking to roasted asparagus.

Most grocery stores stock asparagus year-round. However, April and May are the peak months when asparagus is at its best. Typically we think of the color green with asparagus, but it also comes in white and purple. White asparagus tastes similar to its green cousin, while purple asparagus is much sweeter.

Eat Well to Be Well: Asparagus, a perennial spring favorite

One of the most sought-after vegetables usually signaling the arrival of spring is asparagus. Farmers markets and supermarkets are brimming with this “king of vegetables,” aptly named by France’s King Louis XIV, who cultivated them in greenhouses so he could enjoy them throughout the year.

This tender perennial stem vegetable belonging to the Asparagaceae family was considered a prized delicacy by the ancient Greeks and Romans. Asparagus is closely related to Liliaceae plants, which also include onions and garlic. Asparagus is believed have originated along the coastal regions of the eastern Mediterranean and Asia Minor regions, and is considered one of the oldest known vegetables.

Health benefits of asparagus

Asparagus is naturally rich in many healthy nutrients and compounds we can take advantage of. Therefore, this “king of vegetables” is a must-buy not only for its delicious flavor but to obtain its powerful nutritional benefits:

A Cowboy’s Faith: Opened mail most suspicious

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Uncle Sam’s horses have evidently been lamed a lot recently, and now their riders can’t read too well either.”

Likewise, it’s a wonder tax refunds ever arrive, but interestingly there’s never an issue with past due notices.

A large brown envelope with correct address and canceled postage slip was mailed from Stilwell, Kan., March 11. It arrived at the ranch 25 days later on April 5.

That’s poor service in everybody’s book. Used to be mail from all the way across the country would arrive at the ranch in a couple days. It’s been sometime since that was the case.

A century ago, blame was sometimes placed on the horses, nowadays there’s every other excuse imaginable. Late mail is a common story repeated whatever barbershop, grocery store line, or elevator one stops at.

This time was even much more disturbing. The envelope had already been opened and two short pieces of loose Scotch tape did not seal it back shut. That’s mail tampering, deception or some unlawful action, isn’t it?

Inside the envelope was a collectible country music song book from a friend and a Xeroxed Internal Revenue Service note. No, it wasn’t a past due tax notice and definitely not a tax refund.

Rather the three-inch-by-eight-inch paper was inscribed “Misdirected Mail Opened by the IRS.” To have a preprinted piece like that, evidently, they open lots of mail that’s not theirs.

That would make many people’s blood boil with remaining commentary on the paper likely heating certain tempers even hotter.

It said: “The enclosed correspondence was misdirected to us by the Post Office.” That’s just not logical in any sense of the definition, because the address was legibly correct.

The return address was also very readable. So, if for some reason the big envelope had been undeliverable, it should have been returned to the sender, right?

Excuse given on the IRS note: “The large volume of mail we receive daily is first opened by machine. Therefore, your ‘enclosed’ envelope was opened before we discovered that it was not addressed to the Internal Revenue Service.” The note was inside the original envelope not attached outside.

Suspicion is increasing about both the United States Postal Service and the Internal Revenue Service.

Reminded of Acts 14:2: “They sowed mistrust and suspicion in the minds of the people.”


Frank J. Buchman is a lifelong rancher from Alta Vista, a lifetime newspaper writer, syndicated national ag writer and a marketing consultant. He writes a weekly column to share A Cowboy’s Faith.

 

 

 


A Cowboy’s Faith: Flat tire assistance appreciated

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Fortunately, the tire was only flat on the bottom side.”

A common intended joke said by others when a person has a flat tire, most upsetting when an urgent situation.

Never is a flat tire a joking matter, but nothing to do except figure out how to get it changed.

With major construction on ranch frontage, the main highway was closed last month. Repairs are so complex the thoroughfare won’t be opened to regular traffic until this fall.

What was a 16-minute trip for weekend church now requires 45 minutes, or much longer depending on the detour taken. Of course, the short route is automatically the one to use for most efficiency. So, despite knowing better, the sharp gravel road was selected.

First time there and back was without ordeal other than slow and hazardous with oncoming traffic in the narrow roadway.

Second time wasn’t so fortunate when returning home dash light indicated “low tire.” Hardly sooner than blinked, the right front tire was completely flat, no air whatsoever, almost impossible to guide.

Sought for assistance, the ranch manager was far away but promised to see about finding another helper. Grudgingly the trunk was opened to attempt undertaking the task at hand.

It could have been worse, but not too much. The car has 260,000 miles on it, and the spare had never been used. Only those who’ve figured out how to put such a jack-and-wrench apparatus into use understand how complicated that can be. It’s completely impossible to describe.

When temper was nearest exploding, a pickup truck stopped: “Need some assistance? Here I can help you.”

LTE: Car show cooks up business during annual cruise-in

Dear Editor,

What is the economic benefit of the Twin Lakes Cruisers’ Cruis’n and Cook’n Auto Show to the community? It is bringing in over 250 vehicles (with approximately two people per vehicle) and 1,000 plus spectators to the downtown area in a six to eight hour period of time. Purchases of food, items of interest, future return shopping, the exposure of the business community is tremendous. It creates a fun atmosphere of viewing all types of vehicles, old and new, good music, entertainment, people visiting and having an enjoyable time.

Saturday, April 9, 2022, marked the 18th annual Cruis’n and Cook’n Auto show sponsored by the Twin Lakes Cruisers. The downtown streets were rumbling with the thunder of cars, trucks, vans, classic, muscle, antiques, street rods, rat rods and motorcycles ranging from the 1929 and before to the 2000 and after eras. We were excited this year to include in the show two electric cars in the mix of the other vehicles. They were a 2021 Tesla and 2015 Tesla. The drivers made a weekend trip starting from Colorado Springs and Littleton, Colo., on Friday, arriving in Topeka Friday and coming to Osage City Saturday for the show and traveling back to Colorado on Sunday. They were very interesting to visit with, and were anxious to share information and enjoyed answering questions about the electric cars with the interested spectators. They even gave a couple of the group a ride after the show.

The Twin Lakes Cruisers welcomed approximately 275 entries coming from Missouri, Oklahoma, Colorado and all parts of Kansas. Throughout the day included approximately 1,000 plus spectators that enjoyed viewing the vast array of vehicles that lined both sides of Market Street from Fourth Street to Seventh Street and also the side streets on Sixth Street.

A Cowboy’s Faith: ‘New’ sleigh still horseless

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“That skiff of snow wasn’t enough to bring the ‘new’ sleigh out of the barn.”

Uncertain if there’d even been sufficient white stuff whether Maggie would have been hooked. Still oh what fun it will be when that time comes.

Several friends had been on the lookout for a sleigh and finally one was located in South Carolina. After describing the antique sleigh, relating the cost and opportunities for delivery to Kansas, approval was given for purchase.

First off, one-horse open sleighs like pictured on record covers for the Christmas song are “hot commodities.” While supply is somewhat limited, they are actually available all across the country.

Quality is widely varied, but everyone has a very high cost. The one to be purchased was at the lowest end of other printed asking prices.

When picking up the “new” sleigh, first sight was rather disappointing compared to what had been envisioned. There was little resemblance of other advertised sleighs, one like Santa Claus has and some displayed during Christmas holidays.

Still, the antique sleigh was in good shape considering how old it could possibly be. Everything is timeworn but ready to use including the shafts which alone sometimes are expensive. Scratched and frayed, paint is original; important to collectors.

“You don’t have to take it, and then I’ll just keep it myself,” said the friend who’d acquired the sleigh.

Without much contemplation, check was written, sleigh loaded in the 12-foot horse-stock trailer, brought to the ranch, and into storage.

Hidden History: Deaf education helps early settlers cope with silence on the prairie

Photo of the printing class from History of the Kansas Institution for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb, 1893.

Perry Barnes and his wife Lizzie, like others anxious to take advantage of the newly opened Sac and Fox reservation lands, moved to Osage County in 1866. However, Perry and Lizzie were unlike other settlers – they were both deaf and non-speaking.

Perry and Lizzie settled south of Osage City. While they were different than other settlers, Perry and Lizzie were also not like many other deaf individuals at that time. Both had been educated at schools for the deaf, and Perry had even taught at one. Because he was given a chance at education, Perry became an avid reader and also a successful farmer and stockman.

Even though Perry and Lizzie left Osage County by 1870, evidence of his time here remains, the name of the creek adjoining their property became known as Mute Creek.

Educational possibilities for the deaf in Kansas started with the Kansas Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb in 1861, which was only a small house school in Baldwin City at that time. While the founders desired to impact area deaf children, it was quite some time before their services would be made more widely available. And so, the deaf of the Kansas interior at the time were left adrift in society and few had the knowledge of how to best meet their needs.

In some cases, deaf individuals were cared for at the county poor farm or floated about. One young Burlingame boy was reported in 1883 to have been given a bottle of whiskey and a cigar as he wandered the neighborhoods.

National Deaf History Month is recognized and celebrated every year from March 13-April 15 to recognize the accomplishments of people who are deaf and hard of hearing. 

The deaf school became established in 1866 at Olathe and reached a period of growth and outreach in the 1880s, when it changed its name to the to Kansas Institution for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb. At this time it and began working on integrating deaf students into society instead of merely separating them from it.

The school in Olathe offered free tuition to students and did not charge for board or clothes washing, which put an education within the grasp of most young deaf or hard of hearing people. Students were accepted as early as age 8, enrolled for a 10-year course of study. The school year ran from September to June, and the students would board at the school during that time. At the end of the term, the students often would be carpooled (for a fee) back to their homes across the state.

Within a decade of growth for the school after its expansion in the 1880s, the school doubled in size. There were 17 teachers in the literary departments, and trades like cabinet making, shoe making, harness making, printing, and baking were taught to the boys, and home skills or the arts to the girls.

Ads ran in Osage County newspapers promoting the school, and many families started to take advantage of the offer. Among the first students from Osage County to attend the deaf school in Olathe were Constance Morell, of Osage City, and Fred Allen, of Burlingame.

Like many at the school, Constance was not born deaf, but due to accident or illness, lost her hearing when she was about six. Her parents first sought out assistance from a doctor in Atchison to no avail. She began attending the institute in Olathe in 1887 and excelled in the art of drawing and painting under the direction of teacher Jessie Zearing, an Osage City native.

Overbrook Overlook: Police department to present community safety meetings

Overbrook Police Chief Hollingsworth announced the police department will present a variety of safety events, once per month, beginning in April. Event dates will be announced. Programs will include preventing scams, self defense strategies, human trafficking, first aid/CPR, and prescription drug abuse. There is no cost to attend these events, and everyone is welcome.

Overbrook Community Chest Committee reports that the goal set for the 2021-2022 Community Chest Drive has been reached and exceeded due to the generosity of the community. With a goal of $8,500, the committee raised approximately $15,500. The final proceeds will be allocated to the 16 organizations chosen by the committee. Each organization will receive the amount donated to them as specified by the donors plus a percentage of the non-designated donations received. The success of this campaign shows the willingness of the residents of the Overbrook area to support their home community and projects. The Overbrook Community Chest Committee would like to thank everyone who helped make this year’s drive a success.

Brookside Annual Easter Egg Hunt is scheduled for 2 p.m. April 9, on the Brookside front lawn, 700 W. Seventh St., Overbrook. Age groups are newborns to 3, 3 to 6, and 7 to 9. Bring Easter baskets, and cameras to catch a picture of the Easter Bunny. For more information, contact Brookside at 785-665-7124.

Tree-limb pick-up will be 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 16, when Rotary Club and PRIDE volunteers will pick up limbs that are left curbside throughout the city. Limbs must be cut to a manageable size and stacked at the curb. Volunteers are welcome to participate; meet-up is scheduled for 8 a.m. at KSB. Anyone who plans to burn leaves should check with city hall for burn bans before you burn.

2022 Citywide Garage Sale

Overbrook PRIDE will be hosting the annual April citywide garage sale Friday and Saturday, April 22 and 23. Email [email protected] or find the event on the Overbrook PRIDE Facebook page to submit your sale for the map. Deadline to be on the printed map is April 18. Maps will be distributed online, via the website and at high traffic sponsoring locations. Listing donations for $5.00 can be made at city hall.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Home deliveries nothing new

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Call ‘Four One Oh’ for free delivery twice daily.”

Advertised heavily, seemingly proudly promoted, was that service of Buchman’s Grocery, long gone family business in Council Grove.

Now many years later, grocery stores and other businesses are offering home deliveries. It is as if the service is new and completely unique, but that’s definitely not true.

However, not having checked out delivery service highly publicized by numerous companies, most likely it is far from “free.”

More than 60 years ago, there were nine grocery stores in the hometown, and only one promoted delivery services. However, there were a couple others who likely did deliver groceries to shut-ins and like, whether charging or not unknown.

Of course, that was a much different time as far as what it cost to offer any kind of services. New cars were about $2,700. Gasoline was a quarter a gallon or less. Employees worked for a dollar an hour. Of interest perhaps, stamps were six cents, and grocery store milk was a dollar a gallon.

Morning grocery deliveries were at 10:30, and must be completed before customer’s dinnertime. Afternoon deliveries started at 5 o’clock.

Sometimes three deliveries would be made on Saturday, since the store was closed Sunday. Before holidays, especially weekends when the store would be closed two days, generally four deliveries were made the prior day.

Melvern Jr. Highline makes ‘mighty’ showing at regional club days

By Bella Reeser, Club Reporter

The Melvern Jr. Highline 4-H Club might be small, but they are mighty. All five members that participated in District Club Days qualified for Regional Club Days, which was held Saturday, March 26, 2022, at Ottawa High School.

Braelyn McNally presented a multimedia presentation on livestock and earned a purple. Harper Melton and Bella Reeser preformed a duet dance and earned a purple. Allie Reeser presented a demonstration on cat grooming and earned a blue. Gradey McNally presented a demonstration on making fruit pizza and earned a purple.

A Cowboy’s Faith: New books bring reflections

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Reading is the best way to be informed about the past, present and future while also having a fun time.”

Always enjoying reading since learning how more than 65 years ago; newspapers have generally been read the most. However, books have also been a prominent source of reading through the decades taking spurts of frequency.

That fact has come to mind in recent weeks when two unsolicited books arrived in the mailbox free of charge.

The first one had many pretty pictures, a children’s book of sort. Quick fun reading, it required only five minutes or so of time cover to cover.

The second book, also a paperback, had a price tag of $17.95 on the back cover. It was certainly more intimidating to start reading.

Opening the front page to the small type and long paragraphs made it look uninteresting. Then leafing to the end of 182 pages likelihood of reading the book seemed even more unlikely.

Yet, relaxing in the leather rocking chair recliner, instinct was to pick the book up from the nearby wooden chair. Then all of a sudden there came an urge to see how boring the book really had to be.

Interestingly, reading began and the book was so intriguing true-to-life, no cover-up or pulling punches, it was impossible to put down. Upon completion in maybe four hours more less, the book’s somewhat complex yet somehow quite appealing writing created serious ponder.

The author had faced so many different life situations not unlike many others and reacted to them head on. Desiring to know more about the writer, an email to the book publisher provided contact information.

Eat Well to Be Well: Grocery shoppers can use money saving strategies as inflation soars

Stocking up on healthy staples and reducing food waste are just a couple of strategies to help you with rising prices

Soaring inflation is hitting many consumers hard while buying groceries for their families. From snack foods like chips and cookies to everyday items like milk and meat, food prices are rising up and down the supermarket aisles across the United States. Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs have had some of the highest price increases. According to the latest Consumer Price Index data from early 2022, overall inflation rates rose to 6.8 percent over the previous year, marking the fastest annual increase in the inflation rate since June 1982.

Depending on where you live, many shoppers are also dealing with countless food product shortages, often due to widespread supply chain disruptions. This double whammy of inflation paired with food shortages is particularly concerning since eating is a basic human need.

Even before inflation arrived, many families struggled to feed their families nutritious foods. Now, with food prices continuing to rise, it’s more important than ever to have a plan of action on ways to cut costs and still eat healthy.

Here’s at look at shopping strategies to help save on food while still making nutritious meals:

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