Category Archives: Notions

Chamber Chatter: Volunteers, organizations, participants wrap up successful county fair

By Jeanette Swarts
Osage City Chamber of Commerce

The Osage County Fair Association worked hard this year to have this be one of the best fairs so far. Activities from Wednesday, June 27, 2018, through Saturday, June 30, included exhibits, 4-H activities and competition, Chamber of Commerce Parade, live band, family fun night, pie contest, carnival, cooking demonstration, Shootin’ Hoops 3 on 3 basketball tournament, football 7 on 7 tournament, pet shows, antique tractor show and pull, kids pedal tractor pull, barnyard Olympics, 5K “Glow Run Run”, and a dance party.

2018 Osage City Fair Parade celebrates patriotism

The annual fair parade, sponsored by the Osage City Chamber of Commerce, was Thursday, June 28, 2018. The theme for the parade this year was “Hats Off to Red, White and Blue”.

Diane Michael, parade chairman, did a fantastic job coordinating a variety of entries including the Boy Scouts of Osage City starting the parade as flag bearers, emergency vehicles, including the city and county law enforcement, ambulance and fire department, parade marshal Mary Lou Estes and Mr. and Mrs. Osage City Jerry and Marilyn Giesy, floats, golf carts/ATVs, band, politicians, antique tractors, horses, and others. Even though the heat index was very extreme at parade time, the participants were eager to have a great time and the spectators seemed to enjoy the entries.

Ruins of 160-year-old stage stop stand as monument to Osage County history

By Paul Schmidt

Located west of Burlingame, Kan., just off U.S. Highway 31, Havana Stage Station was a mail stop on the Santa Fe Trail. The stage station and hotel was built in 1858 and offered meals and lodging until 1869.

About 50 German and French families established a community on the site. A large brewery and distillery were also located there. By the early 1870s, most of the German settlers moved to the town of Alma, in Wabaunsee County, and the property was sold for taxes.

The ruins lie about 150 yards from the highway on private land, and the site is accessible only with permission from the landowner. Readers should note it is trespassing to enter private property without permission.

See more of Paul Schmidt’s photos of Havana Stage Station here.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Safe water to drink

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“That blue green stuff in the pond can be deadly to livestock when they drink the water.”

As if there aren’t more than enough concerns with water supplies during this year’s drought, now another issue has arisen.

Evidently, the problem is nothing new, frequently occurring in certain locales during calm, sunny, dry, hot summer days. Still, there hadn’t been that noticeable predicament for about five years in the couple dozen ranch ponds.

Testing back then indicated what the college hotshots identified as algae blooms weren’t making poison water. But, who would know about this year? Cattle were supposed to be rotated into the pasture with the “contaminated” pond several weeks ago.

Now, they couldn’t be moved until water quality was checked. Contact was made with the microscope officials to see if hand delivering a water sample would speed up test results. Assurance was given that would be helpful. Yet, upon arrival at the laboratory, there was a different person in charge.

This paid government employee informed that their testing mechanism was out of whack. The water would have to be sent to another facility and it would take at least a week to hear back.

Grass was gone in the pasture where the cows were grazing, and they needed to be moved to more feed. That couldn’t be done if the pond water was harmful to drink. So, grub the pasture and ship the samples to another tester hoping results return faster than expected.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Highway repairs cause aggravation

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Road construction ahead. Detour now. Watch for flagman. Be prepared to stop. Follow pilot car.”

Those have been the dreaded orange sign alerts that slowed work commute there and back more than 35 minutes daily.

Highway repair and construction are essential, but it can be very aggravating too.

Well, perhaps not as upsetting as big potholes causing flat tires, damage to springs and motor mount weakening.

For nine years, road to the office has been in terrible shape. Up in the morning and down in the evening, it became a daily dread. Certainly, a complaining conversation piece among coworkers.

After years of patching, re-patching and promises of redoing the whole road, new construction is finally underway.

Of course, that requires a detour. In this situation, complete building of an asphalt entrance to the four offices on top of the hill. Give credit where due. That roadway seems high quality considering it’ll be bulldozed away when the main road’s fixed.

So, instead of coming within just a half mile of work on the highway, entrance is a three-mile crooked back road. It seemed lots further, but odometer shows exact same mileage, although slower driving and stop signs take longer.

Main highway from the ranch to interstate is being all redone too. That’s where there’s been major time loss, waiting until two dozen cars go by on the now one-lane road.

Uncertain if the work really needs done, because the highway hasn’t seemed that bad. Moreover, the state department just recently did a nice job of cover-up on a handful of half-mile stretches. Wasting more taxpayer money seemingly.

Red, white, blue and hot for the Osage County Fair Parade

Conklin Plumbing’s first place float was red, white and blue from top hat to bottom.

By Jeanette Swarts
Osage City Chamber of Commerce

The annual Osage County Fair Parade, sponsored by the Osage City Chamber of Commerce, was Thursday evening, June 28, 2018. The theme for the parade this year was “Hats Off to Red, White and Blue”.

Diane Michael, parade chairman, did a fantastic job coordinating a variety of entries including the Boy Scouts of Osage City starting the parade as flag bearers, emergency vehicles, including city and county law enforcement, ambulance and fire department, parade marshal Mary Lou Estes, Mr. and Mrs. Osage City Jerry and Marilyn Giesy, floats, golf carts and ATVs, band, politicians, antique tractors, and horses. Even though the heat index was very extreme at parade time, participants were eager to have a great time and the spectators seemed to enjoy the entries.

Hidden History: Former Lyndon mayor, fire marshal orders sanity in Fourth celebrations

By Wendi Bevitt

In the early 1910s, commissioners at Kansas City, Kansas, started pushing for a sane Fourth of July celebration. Up to this time regulations were very limited. Fire related deaths had been reported as 4,500 in 1903, but with increasing fire awareness had dropped to 1,500 in 1914. Kansas City’s “Sane Fourth” model proposed limiting usage of fireworks as well as a cleanup day on the eve of the celebrations to remove trash and other fire hazards in urban areas. At this time, most buildings in Kansas were wood frame, and the chance of accidental fires was a real threat.

In 1915, newly appointed fire marshal Lewis T. Hussey adopted the Kansas City plan and started promoting its benefits in time for the July 4th holiday.

Lewis Hussey grew up in Coffey County, Kansas, graduating from Burlington High School in 1888. His family moved to Osage County, where his father, Jerry, became register of deeds and Lewis served as deputy until 1893.

Lewis eventually became city clerk and later mayor of Lyndon. As mayor, he led the way to the installation of a city water and sewer system, which had mixed reviews among the citizens of the town. He was also elected to serve as state representative from Osage County and also served as state oil inspector.

During his civil service, Lewis pursued a career in insurance, establishing the Metropolitan Accident Association. He then joined others in organizing the Osage Fire Insurance Company in 1908. His experiences as a civil servant and in the fire insurance field made Lewis a perfect choice for Governor Arthur Capper to appoint him as state fire marshal in 1915. Capper had already started instituting portions of the safety measures of the Kansas City fire prevention plan, such as a statewide clean-up day in April, but Lewis was the perfect person to enforce what had begun.

In his new job, Lewis took protecting Kansas citizens very seriously. He admonished that a “safe and sane” 4th of July celebration was the most consistent way for Kansas to observe the day and that it might be “too much to expect a complete return to sanity after the free range that has been indulged in the celebration in years past, but an effort needs to be made in most cities and towns for a more moderate and intelligent form of celebration.”

A Cowboy’s Faith: Hurting tummy serious concern

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“A bellyache can really be painful making it such nothing can be done but groan.”

Maybe kick the stall until somebody comes to see what in the world is going on.

It was Monday morning after two days at horseshows away from the ranch, and now back home Maggie started kicking. Beating her hind legs against the steel stall, loud banging was heard inside the kitchen 100 yards from the barn.

Maggie was obviously hurting very badly, begging for some relieving help, making it known the best way she could.

Her neck was wet with sweat when turned out into the indoor arena where she immediately started rolling. There seemed some relief when Maggie stood back up with head hanging low, sad look in her eyes.

Checking on the buckskin mare just a few minutes later, she came right to the fence for pacification. Her stomach was still hurting for sure. Now, that is a serious situation dealt with in other horses through the decades. It can be different problems, maybe just stomachache or colic.

While they’re bad even sometimes with serious consequences, other problems like compaction and twisted intestine are generally worse. Treatment for these ailments is complex, frequently ineffective with higher mortality.

Worry and concern for the very sick still beautiful show horse were rapidly increasing.

Walking a horse is generally advised to help indigestion, relieving pressure and discomfort. Maggie went both Number 1 and Number 2, which seemed positive signs. But there was still lots of heartburn soreness as Maggie aggressively bit at her own sides. She started kicking into the air and wouldn’t lead despite coaxed tugging.

Reading earns prizes at Osage City Public Library

By Jeanette Stromgren, Librarian

Wow. We just went through all the prizes we have for the Osage City Public Library’s 2018 summer reading program and it is unbelievable how much we have to give away.

For those who make it to level 4 for ages 0 to fifth grade reading program, you can put your ticket in one of the buckets to have a chance to win either the Branson, Kansas City or Topeka packet. All packets are worth between $200 to $360. If you make it to level 5 and level 6, you will receive a ticket for each level to increase your winning chances.

For those of you who are participating in the sixth to12th grade program, some of the grand prizes are tickets to the Kansas City Renaissance Festival, $50 VISA gift card, gift cards to Pizza Hut, Subway, McCoy’s Home Electronics & Computer Services, Sonic, Taco Bell, Planet Sub and many more. Prizes total over $300.

We haven’t forgotten about those of you are participating in the summer reading adult bingo. Prizes for this group total over $350. The prizes include $70 gift card to Osage Hardware, $50 gift card to Jerry’s, $100 gift card to Topeka Discovery Furniture Mall, tickets to the WWI Museum in Kansas City and gift cards to Osage Building Materials, Marilynn’s, Hardee’s, Olive Garden, Applebee’s and others. Prizes for the adult summer reading program totals over $350.

Last, but not least, are those who are attending our youth summer reading programs. If you attend certain activities, you will be given a ticket to write your name down on and place in another drawing. There will be two winners for this drawing and each winner will receive $50 gift card to the movies.

You still have time to sign up and participate. Those of us at the library are a little jealous of all the great prizes. Stop by Osage City Public Library, 515 Main St., to sign up, or call 785-528-3727 for more information.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Rainfall short, complexity high

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“When it doesn’t rain, all sorts of problems arise.”

How long has it been since there’s was a true pond filling downpour?

Oh, certain locales have received major rainfall with not a single water issue at the present. Yet, just a few miles away, sometimes just across the section, farmers and ranchers alike are in a dire situation.

One cattleman a short stretch over in the county to the west said it right: “We’re in real trouble.”

His concerns outnumbered some others. Crops were planted, trying to grow, but far insufficient moisture such with the heat leaves were curled and deteriorating. Add to that, the spring was dry; every mud hole that had remained in the creek was gone. There hadn’t been water in the pond for a week.

Short sprigs of grass showed here and there, keeping the yearlings on the prowl, weight gains going backwards. What’s a producer to do? Nothing one can do about the growing crops, barring a new irrigation system, except pray for rain.

Cattlemen do have some alternatives. Sell now, stop the losses. Haul feed and water hoping for some profit; feeling assured “it’ll rain tonight.”

Small showers on the ranch though far and few between have kept most hardy native pastures with some green regrowth. There is limited feedstuff, not yet requiring supplement for the cows and calves if they graze diligently.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Cost for water insignificant

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“The water quit running all of a sudden.”

That loud exclamation always sends alarm around the ranch house and barnyard.

While it’s happened a number of times in nearly five decades, fortunately there haven’t been many recent issues.

Of course, personal concerns come to mind first. The toilet won’t flush, there’s no faucet water to drink or shave with, and no way to take a bath.

In reality, those are minor problems compared to the livestock being without water. Right now, there are only a handful of horses in the lots. But, days gone by, sometimes cattle and hog numbers have been a hundred or more. Livestock must have water.

Fixing anything to do with the water system is obviously a plumber’s job. Yet, sometimes an electricity blink causes breakdown requiring simple switch shut off and on. It was more complicated this time.

What made the problem even worse, it was Saturday morning. Getting somebody to come to a ranch is often complex in itself, but on a weekend can become a nightmare.

“Let’s see, who put the water pump in?” Obviously, that’s the first one to be called. His machine answered, and message was left.

Help House News: ECKAN ‘gives back’ to local community

By Raylene Quaney

Last month, Help House was a recipient of ECKAN’s “Giving Back Day” on May 24, a group of ECKAN employees, all from the Paola Head Start program, painted two of our outdoor storage sheds. A big thank you to Jamie B., Trish T., Kesha T., Caitlin M., and Kirby M. The sheds look great and your help and service to others was greatly appreciated.

Happy birthday, Help House

Help House will be 15 years old in July. A huge celebration is being planned for everyone in Osage County to come and enjoy a day of listening to local music groups, games for kids young and old, food, and lots more. More information will be available soon, so save the date, July 15, a Sunday evening from 3-8 p.m. It is going to be a great time. You won’t want to miss it.

Good Sense Budget Class

The next “Good Sense” budget class is scheduled for 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday, June 25, 2018. It will be a one-day class. You must call to register and stop by and pick up pre-course work. Participants are to bring a sack lunch and beverage. The class is free and once complete the participant is eligible to receive assistance with heating or cooling bills.

Mobile food pantry

Mobile Food Pantry dates: Carbondale was 12-1 p.m. on the first Tuesday,  June 5, at  Carbondale Church of Christian Fellowship;  Osage City is 10-11 a.m. the third Thursday, June 21, at Osage City Community Center; Melvern is 12:30 -1:30 p.m. on the third Thursday, June 21, at  Melvern Community Center; Burlingame is 10-11 a.m. on the third Thursday, June 21, at Burlingame Federated Church; Lyndon is 12-1 p.m. on the third Friday, June 15, at Jones Park on East Sixth Street. Participants in line 15 to 20 minutes before starting time will be in the counted numbers when it is decided how much of each item each family will receive.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Go slow then fast

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“It’s hard for those ‘peanut rollers’ to understand they’re being asked to run.”

Actually, a number of horses ridden only in show pleasure classes haven’t ever run with a rider aboard.

Of course, all know how to run in the pasture. Yet, sadly certain horses are so intimidated they don’t seem to remember how to run when being ridden.

For clarification, “peanut roller,” again unfortunately, is now a fairly common term in horseshow circles. It describes a horse being ridden at a very slow gait carrying the head unnaturally low.

At a glance to a lay onlooker, it actually could appear that the nose is pushing something on the ground.

Horses being trained, ridden and shown in this manner have become a highly controversial issue. It has even been considered inhumane to make a horse ride in such an artificial form.

Rulebooks and judges training have for years prohibited officials from placing entries ridden in this manner. That’s not stopped the “problem” as horses are still being shown that way.

Maggie’s is not a “peanut roller” by any means. However, it’s always been a continuous effort to keep her riding slow with level neck and pleasant natural head carriage.

Sometimes she works nearly as desired and other times not. Maggie can easily get excited picking up her head and going faster, but not running.

Such speedup gets a reprimand, which generally hurts her feelings, even if not slowing down to desired rate.

Chamber Chatter: Osage City Municipal Golf Course opens for businesses

Osage City Golf Course board members welcomed Chamber members for an “After Hours” in April; from left, Dave Wiley, Gordon Worthing, Kim Bergquist, Clint Silver, Richard Burkdoll, and Matt Harmon. Chamber photo.

By Jeanette Swarts, Chamber Director

The Chamber of Commerce “After Hours” is a quarterly networking event held for Chamber members and guests. Attendees have the opportunity to become acquainted with the businesses and patrons in the community.

The Osage City Municipal Golf Course hosted an After Hours Mixer on April 27, 2018. Approximately 20 attended the event. Everyone enjoyed delicious snacks and beverages and good conversation.

The course is in great shape and the golf board members would like to encourage everyone to come out and enjoy a game of golf. Available are a variety of memberships to join which include single, family and student. The spacious club house is also available to rent for meetings, parties and receptions. Sunday morning breakfast is also served during selected months throughout the year. Many tournaments are hosted throughout the year at the course.

Scheduled plans for future “After Hours” will be ECAT in July, Peterson’s Assisted Living in September, and Ramblin’ Rose in December.

Osage City Chamber of Commerce awards scholarships

Chamber scholarship recipients, Georgia Hutton and Carter Swindale.

This year, the Chamber received several excellent applications for the scholarships. The applicants demonstrated outstanding scholastic achievements and community service. The scholarship requires students to submit an application, two letters of reference, an official transcript, and an essay covering “the advantages of owning and operating a business in a small town.”

The revenue from the $5 that residents pay to be listed on the maps for the spring and fall garage sales goes directly for these two scholarships.

The Osage City Chamber of Commerce was pleased to announce Georgia Hutton and Carter Swindale as the 2018 recipients of the $250 scholarships.

Letter to Editor: City councilman spreads kindness in Scranton

Dear Editor:

Tim Nedeau, left, with “Lefty” Stephenson, helped his Scranton neighbors with clearing unwanted saplings from their yard.

My name is Dana Webber, and I live in Scranton. A couple of weeks ago I had a knock at the door in the late afternoon. When I answered it, I was surprised to see one of our city commissioners standing there, Tim Nedeau. He asked me to step outside to talk and proceeded to ask me if it would be okay if he came by the next week with his chain saw and cut down the unwanted tree saplings which had grown up around the south side of our house. Wow, I was excited, and immediately accepted the offer.

I am a widow of 14 years, and my younger brother, Terry, who is disabled with a back injury, and my dad, Raymond “Lefty” Stephenson, a WWII veteran who is nearly 99 years old, also live with me. None of us are able to do this type of labor. Imagine how thrilled I was to have someone offer their time to come and do such a wonderful gesture of kindness.

Last week around 8 a.m. I heard a chain saw going, so stepped out to see if it was Tim. Sure enough there he was working diligently cutting down these unwanted trees (some were up to the rooftop). I’d wanted them removed before but didn’t know who to contact. After a brief chat with Tim, I found he really cares about the community and is trying to improve its appearance. I too care about the appearance of my property and have seen some positive changes in the cleaning up of some properties in the area. I am thankful for someone like him representing the city of Scranton in such a positive manner.

When I asked Tim why he chose to do this for us, he said, “I knew you and a WWII veteran lived here, and I just wanted to help out.”

Sincerely,
Dana Webber, Scranton

A Cowboy’s Faith: Remembering lost loved ones

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“What a terribly sad day, yet such a most beautiful reflection of memories all at the same time.”

That is quite a conflicting statement, yet there’s no question about the truth of it.

Every year as far back as the brain will remember, Memorial Day has been a very special time.

In the beginning only one grave was visited. There wasn’t even a tombstone for namesake Grandpa Frank. Only Grandma Buchman, Nannie, knew exactly where he was buried in Calvary Cemetery.

Dad (Clarence) was only 11 years old when Grandpa passed, uncle Elmer was 14, and Aunt Luvella was quite young. Of course, there was no money to buy any kind of marker.

Upkeep of graveyards wasn’t important for many years either. So, in the mid-‘50s and perhaps later, Dad, usually with Grandma accompanying, would mow Grandpa’s grave lot. It wasn’t regular care with the push wheel-powered mower, but always done the week before “Decoration Day.”

Finally, sometime in the late ’50s, a nice gray granite grave marker was purchased. It was engraved with pertinent now-most-interesting information about the Frank Buchman and placed where Grandma said to.

When Grandma passed, nearly half a century after Grandpa, she was buried beside him with matching stone. Elmer is next to her, and Dad and Mom are buried behind them.

Nowadays, at least four cemeteries are visited in the important day’s trek. Flowers, sometimes artificial and occasionally real ones, are placed on lost loved one’s graves.

Osage County continues traditions of honor

Members of Legion posts countywide, join together for a Memorial Day ceremony on the Pomona Dam tower.

By Geri Schuler, American Legion Post 125

Osage County is full of military traditions and customs. The best part is young families beginning their own traditions, and honoring old traditions being handed down through generations.

Memorial Day is full of old traditions and honor, especially when it comes to the local legions posts. Through the years, new people ensure these traditions carry on.

Brandon Smith, left, welcomes Lt. Col. Ret. Sam Newland, who provided the prayer at Lyndon and Vassar Memorial Day ceremonies.

In the Lyndon area, the Smith family, with two younger girls and a boy (Jesina, Grady, Peyton), continue a tradition from another family in American Legion Post 125.  Brandon Smith is the vice commander of the Sons of the Legion Post 125. He volunteered, with his young family, to take over with the tradition of putting up flags for veterans. They went to three area cemeteries Friday.

Brandon said, “It is written that there is no greater love than for someone to lay their life down for another. Every small flag represents someone willing to do just that. They deserve our continued gratitude.”

This is a tradition he wants to continue in the future for his family to show gratitude.

In Burlingame is the Diver family with their young daughter. Aaron Diver and his father are both marine veterans. He brought his daughter, Adisyn, to Burlingame Cemetary to place flags with their community.  This was his way to show her the meaning of Memorial Day and the sacrifices not just her family made but that of other people.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Doors open for new opportunities

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman. “Promise for new beginnings down life’s many highways and varied directions.”

That the message from commencement speakers in recent days. Not any different than every year for decades, likely centuries.

Sure enough truth and soundest advice for those so very excited about successfully completing another educational objective.

When special gradations recognitions and scholarships are bestowed, it wouldn’t be that hard for some to get a big head. “I’m famous. Look at all I’ve done.”

Certainly it’s amazing the accomplishments of those who’ve walked across the stage shaking hands this month.

That sheepskin is truly a valuable piece of paper and will help open countless doors throughout a lifetime. They’re opportunities which wouldn’t have ever come without hours, days, months, years, midnight crams studying, rewarded with honorable report cards.

School days are truly some of the very best times ever. It’s incomprehensible those who contend: “I hate school.”

Perhaps one might heavily dislike the book learning, testing, demand to study what is being taught. Yet, education is really only a small part of school.

Hidden History: Kansas county named in honor of Civil War private, Osage County native

Rev. Josiah McAfee, inset, as a Kansas legislator, honored the sacrifice of one of his recruits by naming Rooks County after him.

By Wendi Bevitt

Fifty-six Kansas counties honor the names of soldiers from the Civil War. Only two, however, bear the name of men who held the rank of private – Rooks and Osborne. Rooks County, while located in the western half of the state, is forever connected to Osage County as the recipient of the name of Osage County native, John Calvin Rooks.

John Calvin Rooks, familiarly called “Calvin”, was born in Pennsylvania and came with his family to Kansas in 1858. His parents, John and Delilah, set up their farm two miles south of Burlingame when the county was still known as Weller. The family became members of the Burlingame Baptist church and faithfully attended.

In mid-September of 1862, Calvin enlisted in Company I of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Infantry. Many men from both Burlingame and Grasshopper Falls (modern Valley Falls in Jefferson County) were recruited into this company by the Rev. Josiah B. McAfee.

The new recruits were taken to Fort Leavenworth where they received brief military training and then were deployed to the battle fronts in Indian Territory and Arkansas. Company I saw action at Old Fort Wayne, Indian Territory (Oklahoma), on October 22 and then at Cane Hill in Arkansas on November 28.

Each time the company established a camp, a Thursday night prayer meeting would be held in a large Sibley tent, led by the Rev. Josiah McAfee, who served both as 1st Lieutenant of Company I as well as chaplain. Being a Christian man, Calvin attended each meeting. At the prayer meeting on December 4, Rev. McAfee was shaking hands with each of the attendees and asking them to relate his religious experience. Private Rooks told Rev. McAfee that from the age of nine, he had chosen to be a soldier for Christ.

Cemetery map inquiry clears up foggy history of old Prairie Center Church

The remains of Old Prairie Center Church, now being used as a barn. OCHS photo.

By Eileen Davis, Osage County Historical Society

Usually I title these discussions as “day” rather than month but that does not adequately describe this adventure. It began with an email from a person who had looked at Wayne White’s website, www.osagecountyonline.com. (Please check it often if you don’t already.) His query was innocent enough.

“I am seeking help in identifying the name of a church and cemetery that were located approximately one mile east of the Prairie Center Cemetery on 125th Street. Your cemetery map records this as #34 and calls it ‘No Name.’ Can you shed any further light on the name of the church and those who are buried at the adjacent cemetery? Does the cemetery and any grave markers still exist?”

So I checked Mr. White’s website and learned that his Osage County cemetery map differed from the one we use and I learned that we could not give permission for ours to be used at his website. (Another long story but the permission was not ours to give.) I’m not sure where Mr. White got his map but I did find a similar one on the website that indicated a #34 one mile east of Prairie Center. (See Osage County News’ Cemeteries of Osage County here.)

Esther Little and I drove out there on the way home one evening and found Prairie Center on the south side of the road at 125th and Valencia Road. We saw no other cemeteries in the area.

I turned this problem over to John Hill, who’s been doing new research on several Osage County cemeteries and some really great field work. He spoke to farmers who now own the land and learned that the original church and cemetery had been moved. He also learned that the church, after some additions, was still being used as a barn. John also discovered evidence of graves at the original location. To further add to the confusion, John found an obituary for Andrew H. Caldwell, which stated in the first column that he would be buried in Prairie Center Cemetery. The second column of the same article said “Sharon Cemetery.”

Lions and Tigers share Lyndon pride

This spring Lyndon High School students participated in the first Tiger Action Day. One of the activities was to help paint the Lyndon Lions Club picnic tables at Jones Park. Students shown painting are, from left, Marah Bingham, Skye Brosch, and Kolsyn Bergkamp. The picnic tables, serving counter and shelter house were constructed in the late 1990s in Jones Park by the Lions Club. The Lions extended a hearty thank you to the students for their great work.

Photo thanks to Bill Patterson.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Always dream then work

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.Cowboys have always been the biggest heroes.

That continues, yet in maturity those even much older who are still working very hard have also become mentors.

Too many classmates have already passed to the great beyond, while being among those continuing forward on earth has challenges.

Just keeping up with what there is can be a fulltime job, yet those many decades older plunge fast forward.

Often television stories feature those celebrating their century birthdays and even years beyond. Those recognized are generally able to physically get around, of sound mind, and excited for every day they have.

Each situation is different of course, and none ever really have secrets to longevity. Yet they all get up and at it every morning, remaining active all day with an occasional nap. Each one eats three nourishing meals daily with maybe an extra snack and keeps up with what’s going on around. Many read regularly, have numerous friends and are strong in faith.

One friend at 98 was forced into assisted living away from home for a time. Not yet mowing his lawn or driving to town, he’s back on the farm feeling happier and healthier.

Every morning on the way to work at 6:30, another farmer friend’s kitchen light is on and he’ll be outside before 7 o’clock. Despite serious health issues, at 94 nothing stops him, always still going when returning from work 11 hours later.

At 89, a former teacher with more than one’s share of hardship started his ranch upon official retirement. Non-relenting entrepreneurship coupled with opportunities, the operation surpasses others built through generations. Not unique perhaps, but notable, covenants and dreams backed by hard work must be credited.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas