Category Archives: Notions

A Cowboy’s Faith: Fun neighbors on Halloween

“Trick or treat give me something good to eat.”

That’s the threat of ghosts, goblins and every other imaginable getup on Halloween. But it sends them for a whirl with the response: “Sorry no treats it’ll have to be tricks.”

Living in the country, little Halloween visitors are usually few and this year there weren’t any.

The highlight several years though now is when the dairy farm couple from across the section rings the doorbell. It’s usually past bedtime when Keith and Donna come after visiting friends in a 25-mile radius of the farm. All lights were on so they’d know ranchers were waiting.

About 10:20, buzzer sounded, door opened and in came Uncle Sam and his appropriately patriotically attired lady. Big smiles shining through elaborate costume assured it was the dairy farmers who’d hired milkers to get their night off.

Impossible to repeat words of the Uncle Sam song they harmoniously presented. Then the milkmaid asked, “Why did Yankee Doodle Dandy come riding in on a pony?” With no certain answer, just assuming it was sure better than walking.

More than two dozen stops already made, with several more lights awaiting their arrival. Minimal visiting reflected how the elaborate silk red, white and blue outfits came to be.

Donna picked up pieces here, there, yawn, and with scissors, needle, thread expertise put together great semblance to ones pictured. Red stripes on Keith’s white pants were “just painted there.”

Memory’s shy who all they’ve portrayed years gone by: cheerleaders, Roy and Dale, Popeye and Olive, more. A couple other neighbor ladies helped one year for Wizard of Oz. Always with singing accompaniment.

Last year, before dark call informed ice was stopping them, but fortunately back this time.

The jovial neighbors hadn’t made trick or treat warning, but came with their own treats. Costuming, entertaining, visiting were special delight enough, but Donna again handed four big popcorn balls out of her satchel.

That would have been a good day’s work making enough of the evening snacks. Then they had to pack the goodies in the back of their station wagon to be given out.

Oh yes, uptown morning after there were no main street tricks, hay, tires, outhouses like of decades ago.

Reminded of Luke 15:9: “Call together friends and neighbors for a time of rejoicing.”


030615-franksmug2Frank J. Buchman is a lifelong rancher from Alta Vista, a lifetime newspaper writer, syndicated national ag writer and a radio marketing consultant. He writes a weekly column to share A Cowboy’s Faith.


Help House News: Full coat closet warms hearts and people

By Raylene Quaney

The “coat closet” was open from Oct. 1 through Oct. 31 this year with 240 coats being given out. What was left is now out on the floor for those shoppers who are still in need of a nice warm coat for this winter. Adults’ and children’s coats are available while they last. A number of coats were sent to Hope House in Ottawa to be given out there.

Thanksgiving baskets

Those who signed up for a Thanksgiving food baskets are reminded to pick up on their selected day, either Wednesday, Nov. 14, or Thursday, Nov. 15. There were a total of 52 turkeys and 36 chickens available for Thanksgiving baskets. There will not be a giveaway in December as in the past.

Enjoy a soup supper at annual meeting

Nov. 13 at 6 p.m. will be the Help House annual meeting and soup supper, which will be held at the First Baptist Church, Lyndon. If you plan to attend, please call the center and let us know so we have plenty of food available for all. There will be a number of volunteers recognized for their service at that time. We could not open our doors to serve those in need with out you.

It’s good sense to take budget class

The next “Good Sense” budget class will be held 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19. It will be a one-day class. Participants must call to register and stop by and pick up pre-course work. Participants are to bring a snack for lunch if desired and a beverage. The class is free and once completed the participant is eligible to receive assistance with heating or cooling bills. This includes electric, gas, propane or solid fuel (wood). There will not be a class held in December.

Cards of thanks

A number of cards of appreciation go out this month to the following for their contributions to this ministry: EK Realty and e.b. Sprouts, in Lyndon, are collecting food for Thanksgiving baskets; the Lyndon FBLA donated 520 items to the pantry; Overbrook Search Light Club donated 32 cleaning supply items for use at Help House; Overbrook United Methodist Church made a food pantry donation; Overbrook Thimble Club, 43 items for Thanksgiving plus a cash donation; Overbook Fidelis Club, 67 food and non-food items, 12 coats and miscellaneous clothing items.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Always ready to help

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“How are the calves doing this summer?”

“Did the kids go to the judging contest?”

“What livestock is the family showing at the fair?”

Forever congenially interested in livestock and those who cared for them was Albert Morgan.

His recent passing left a void in heartfelt conscientious livestock production dating to depression times.

Equal to Albert’s dedication to livestock husbandry was belief in youth and programs where they could develop. Learn about the industry, but as importantly leadership and social skills.

There were always fond memories of Albert’s 4-H days, showing livestock, earning nationwide leadership recognition.

Soon, Albert’s Hilltop Hereford Farm also with Poland China hogs was producing seed stock demanded over a wide area.

While Albert was classmate to Uncle Ted, personal first knowledge of Albert was when he married grocery co-worker Gayla.

Albert was a middle-age bachelor-stockman called one Sunday to serve as lay minister where Gayla was pianist.

Accompanying Albert’s hymn singing, Gayla admitted, “I set the trap for him.”

Widowed mother of three, Gayla was soon to be Albert’s bride as he became stepdad to Cheryl, Sharon and Mike.

“It was the best day of my life,” Albert always contended.

Hidden History: Toe-tappin’ leads Lyndon’s cobbler to his career choice

By Wendi Bevitt

In an era when a favorite pair of shoes was meant to last past the time when they lost their sole, the Royal Shoe Shop served the community of Lyndon. Previously owned by a Mr. Leslie L. Barnes, it was purchased in 1923 by Clyde Morand, a fresh graduate of the Kansas School for the Deaf.

Clyde was the son of Elmer and Gertrude Morand, and was born in Kansas in 1903. Elmer hosted barn dances throughout the summer, entertaining the community with music and laughter. However, after a time, Elmer and Gertrude noticed that Clyde was not able to hear the joyous sounds and share in them.

The Morands heard of Dr. William H. Cook, a recent immigrant to the area who specialized in eyes, ears, nose and throat, and drove to Beloit to see what could be done for their son.

The family shortly thereafter moved south of Topeka, which undoubtedly offered more resources for their deaf son. In 1913, Clyde started attending the Kansas School for the Deaf, in Olathe. This boarding school had been created in 1866 and was the first of its kind in the state. In addition to teaching the students sign language and typical school subjects, they were also taught a trade that would help them after they graduated. Vocational training included baking, sewing, printmaking, and shoemaking – which is the trade that Clyde would learn.

The shoemaking department was established early on in the school’s history, its lead teacher being Charles “C. H.” Hyer. Mr. Hyer moved to Olathe in 1872 and began teaching the students how to make and mend shoes. C. H. opened a cobbling shop on the side and was assisted by his brother Edward. In 1875, a cowboy stomped into Hyer’s boot shop complaining about his boots and petitioning Hyer to create a better boot. C. H. determined that the best style had a pointed toe, higher and sloped heel, and stitching up the leg. The style was a hit and propelled Hyer’s boots to a favorite among cowboys and those keeping the Wild West alive in film. Hyer’s prosperity in boot making did not sever his relationship with the school, however. Hyer boots continued to be involved in vocational education in the industrial department.

Reader cautions against crossing bridges closed for maintenance

Pranksters or vandals caused danger to themselves and others by removal and destruction of bridge barriers in rural Osage County late Friday or early Saturday.

Dear Editor:

Yesterday, Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018, we had an incident involving the destruction of some county “bridge closed” barriers that blocked the bridge on Hoch Road (where it crosses the South Branch Wakarusa River in northwest Osage County). The Osage County Sheriff was contacted by my father, Ed Franklin, and county maintenance arrived soon afterwards.

My main reason for writing is to warn motorists to not to attempt to cross closed bridges.

Sinkhole at the edge of the bridge abutment shows erosion under the road surface. Photos by Cheryl Franklin.

This bridge is extremely unsound due to sinkholes that have undercut the dirt road due to the rains and the age of this bridge. In fact, one of the maintenance crew informed my father that the sinkhole on the north side of the bridge was caused by him just walking on it to assess the concrete. Luckily he caught himself before he fell completely through the hole and was only scratched.

The signs and barriers are back up and thankfully this time no one was injured. Even though my parents live near the bridge, no one heard anything – so the damage could’ve happened anytime between late Friday night to when it was discovered around 5 p.m. Saturday.

Thank you,
Cheryl Franklin

A Cowboy’s Faith: Safety always comes first

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“There’s just nothing to ride.”

How can that be with two dozen horses always anxious to get their noses in the feed bucket?

Of course, excitement adrenalin flowed when the nice lady asked for another outrider in the community historical pageant. Initial smiling consensual agreement then turned into concerned caution. Maybe that wouldn’t really be such a good idea all things considered.

Magnified voices, background sounds, extensive props, live bonfires, other animals, and costumed people create an atypical environment. Especially when dark and chill of the night are added to the equation.

An outsider looking in wouldn’t give second thoughts of what all actually could happen. Especially when seeing other participating horses very relaxed nonchalant to the unique circumstances.

Yet, easily there could be a real catastrophe if a horse decided those were the bogeyman out to get him. Even if a horse just sashayed a little bit with the tight scene layout unthinkable damage could occur.

Yes, the whole play would be caput with serious destruction to the extensively coordinated staging area.

That’s bad, but the horse, other horses and animals, could be readily hurt, too. Much worse is high possibility of injury to so many people, those in the cast and the spectators.

Several of the horses are considered well broke, while some have collected innumerable championships in a wide array of competitions.

Yet, none were considered safe to be a part of the program. Horsemanship abilities of handler can come into play, but that just doesn’t matter with certain horses.

Based on experience, perhaps horse sense, it just wouldn’t be sensible to take the high risks involved.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Only remembering those days

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Sure glad didn’t have to get horses ready and the place cleaned up for a sale and field day.”

For three decades, the second Saturday of October was that annual ranch affair, but thankfully not any more.

Oh, it was an undeniable success and heartfelt romance creating year around excitement, planning and anticipation.

Although there hasn’t been such a special ranch event since 2009, people still wonder: “When’s the sale?”

They even call, email and write for sale catalogs. “Sorry no sale,” but sure happy there wasn’t one this year, and none planned ever again.

Best part about it however is all of the most congenial remembrances so many others have.

Frequently, now a middle-age adult will comment: “I came to your judging contest every year. It was so much fun. I placed first one year.”

Perhaps more significant are the appreciative and fond memories of the sale horses. Last week, a buyer from years ago related, “I bought a gray colt by that Zane stallion. He sure made a good all-around horse. He’s retired now, but will always have a home with us; we call him Zane, too.”

Likewise, questions often are, “Do you still have your mares? Do you have that Hackberry Star mare? I’d sure like to have another colt out of her.”

In reality, it all began as a livestock judging field day following format of the one neighbor-friend Albert Morgan had.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Statement settlement is essential

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Nobody likes to pay their bills.”

That’s not completely true, because the majority of people who buy something expect to remunerate for it.

Sadly there are exceptions when there is never intention to reimburse for what is purchased. In those cases, the buyer still ends up having to compensate. Even if it goes into drawn out proceedings, ultimately lockup.

Quite the opposite realm is those who eagerly pay whatever debt is claimed. Mom was that way; the second a bill arrived, she made payment. There were certain grocery store customers who were slow paying charge accounts, and she didn’t want to be like that.

Immediate reimbursement for statements is commendable, but it may not always be the smartest thing either. One must make certain what has been invoiced was actually ordered.

It’s of more concern now than earlier times with unlawful shenanigans increasingly prevalent in today’s mobile social communications.

Still, bills must be paid or somebody is stealing and another is losing. Plain and simple economics whatever the right definition that’s definitely the way it is.

A Cowboy’s Faith: School days good times

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.Some contend no use lingering, yet remiss not to reflect more lifetime happenings. Those following earlier writing about Gordon Morrison have their memories.

Several shared recollections at his 90th birthday party, but personal times keep coming to mind.

First remember delivering groceries to Mr. Morrison’s home and to his in-laws Glen and Clara Maude by Elm Creek.

Then think about him wearing felt stockman’s hat slipping into the grocery store backdoor borrowing eggs. He’d get a 30-dozen crate for vo-ag students to practice candling for poultry competitions.

Of course, FFA entry in the homecoming parade made heartbeat skip. It was a horse built from a barrel that bucked with hydraulic lift power of an Allis tractor. An FFA member, once Dennis Taylor with yellow shirt, blue scarf, mounted waving above the “FFA Bucks To Victory” sign.

Mr. Morrison taught Sunday school for decades but not all seventh and eighth graders learned their required Bible verses.

Old Army barracks shop and classroom didn’t meet safety codes, yet with right instructor served purpose well.

Freshman class totaled a dozen; all farm kids, except one grocery store carryout wannabe cowboy. Everything agriculture was such taught that farming almost got into the genes.

Letter: Osage City Lions thank you for helping ‘Knights of the Blind’

Dear Editor:

Helen Keller challenged international Lions Club members to be “Knights of the Blind” in 1925. Since then Lions Clubs throughout the world have been dedicated to accepting this challenge.

The Osage City Lions Club has put on a golf tournament for 38 years, with the purpose of donating money to the Kansas Lions Sight Foundation. This foundation provides eye care to people of Kansas, including sight screenings that Lions do for school children all over the state.

Because of you who donate money, gifts and time, we have had very successful tournaments. The list of our sponsors is unbelievable, and they have assisted the Osage City Lions in donating $1,000 every year of the tournament to help do our part to accept Helen Keller’s challenge.

The Osage City Lions Club thanks you for your continued support!

Sincerely,
Richard Burkdoll
Osage City Lions Club

A Cowboy’s Faith: Teacher’s immeasurable influence recognized

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Happy birthday to you. Happy birthday, Gordie. Happy birthday to you.”

Nearly 100 friends and family from throughout the country gathered in the front yard at the Morrison Ranch.

It was the 90th birthday party for Gordon Morrison. Gordie, to those knowing him from original stomping ground. He’s Gordon to acquaintances, since calling Cloud County home 49 years. But still Mr. Morrison to many students from a 40-year teaching career.

Smiles abounded from not only the honoree fit, vim, ornery like always, but everyone there. First and foremost his wife Janet, ramrod of the fling.

Unquestionably a big ordeal getting the ranch in tiptop shape and planning the country meal. Toughest challenge was spreading the word local to afar.

Not only immediate family, but distant relatives including nephews and nieces nationwide came to Gordie’s celebration. There were nowadays neighbors with decades’ gone-by faculty and chums chiding Gordon.

Former students from the early ’60s at Council Grove through Concordia college classes came to honor Mr. Morrison.

It was certain verification positive influence one growing up a Morris County country boy had on so many. And, deepest appreciation for that.

Covenant made in Korean wartime, Mr. Morrison was to be a teacher. Yet, farming implored his being attempting combined teaching and agriculture professions.

Classroom won out educating students about farming, accompanied by wisdom developing wholesome worthwhile lives.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Finally came around again

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“He has his own office.”

“Again, finally,” one might say. History has repeated itself in nearly 46 years.

“Wet behind the ears,” repeating the familiar cliché, sheepskin in hand, walked into the big block-square highfalutin brick building headquarters.

As the first full-time editor there, very own office was right inside the front door to the right. Big walnut desk, leather rocking chair, personal phone, right up with the big folks, or thought so.

Still for several weeks, then off and on for a very longtime after, always concerned about being fired. Subsided over decades, but came to actuality in 36 1/2 years.

Through that time, locations in the office did change though, at least a handful. When an intern came in, then hired as a news coworker, too, the fancy personal office was shared for a spell. It wasn’t private then, rather cohabited, creating a definite ugh.

From there, several different places in the large main office area became “work station,” with desk, phone and files. There was no privacy for an always loud-talking cowboy, everybody heard every word, and that sure wasn’t good.

Nothing stays the same, fortunately in many situations, and again the powers-that-be assigned another personal office. There were actually quite a few perks with it. Privacy such could close the door, although typically didn’t, yet ample storage space, uptown again. A nice retired woman was even hired to come sometimes to help with filing and organization.

That transitioned again in 10 years or so, back to a desk in makeshift cubicle. Not everything obvious, but loud talker still audible to all others.

Then, the young boss who’d been handed keys to the business was prodded by the bookkeeper, and likely a teenybopper. “All he does is talk horses, kick him out.” And, they did.

Hidden History: Nation reaps rewards of local public service corps

At the Civilian Conservation Corps camp at Burlington, Kan., recruits end their duty day with a retreat ceremony. Photo from Bevitt collection.

By Wendi and Tod Bevitt

The outlook at the start of the 1930s was shrouded in a cloud of economic failure and dust as a result of the stock market crash of 1929, drought, and poor soil conservation practices. Unemployment had risen to 25 percent by 1933, and while that did not affect farmers, the dropping crop and stock prices did. The great clouds of dust that were forming on the horizon were a result of the wartime effort after 1914, during which the amount of acreage devoted to wheat was greatly increased, also known as “The Great Plow Up”.  The combination of drought, overgrazing of pastures and poor conservation practices overall led to a period of massive dust storms led to the region being called the Dust Bowl.

When President Franklin Roosevelt took office in 1933, he immediately set in motion work relief programs to deal with the dire financial situation facing the country, one of which was the Civilian Conservation Corps or CCC. The CCC focused on conservation projects, a subject Roosevelt had previously shown favoritism towards during his tenure as governor of New York. The CCC not only put unemployed young men to work, but also increased their employability through education and experience on the many public service projects performed by the various camps.  There were generally three different types of CCC projects in Kansas: soil erosion, lake creation or maintenance, and those focusing on reforestation.

A Cowboy’s Faith: No control over weather

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“After every dry spell, there’s a wet spell.”

“A drought has never lasted forever.”

“It’s always rained sometime when it got good and ready.”

“Every drought is followed by rain.”

Those old-timers’ familiar philosophies have sure been proven true again.

Now like it’s continually been throughout time, comments have made a complete turnaround.

A few weeks ago most questioned: “Is it ever going to rain?”

In the past several days none too few have evaluated: “I sure wish it would quit raining.” Others posed it: “Is this rain ever going to stop?”

Then, more than one commented: “All of these cloudy, wet, dreary days make everyone so grumpy. It’s depressing. People are getting stressed out.”

Solution, “We need some bright blue-skied sunny days again.”

Honest evaluation is, “Rain is always better than no rain.”

For the most part, ranchers can’t get too much moisture. It makes the grass grow while keeping fresh water in the ponds, creeks and springs. Dry ponds again have water, some to overflowing.

Suicide prevention: We all have a role

Dear Editor,

As a psychologist working in the field of suicide prevention for military veterans, I’ve known too many incredible people who’ve lost their lives to suicide. In recognition of National Suicide Prevention Week, I’d like to share some information with you.

We don’t talk a lot about this issue, but it is nothing short of a crisis in Kansas. Our state’s suicide rate has spiked by a staggering 45 percent since 1999 – the fifth highest increase of all states, and almost double the national average.

Many of us have had a passing thought of suicide, but fewer of us act on it. When we’re connected to reality, we understand that suicide always hurts the ones we love most. But when a person loses that connection in the depths of depression or begins to feel like a burden, it can be incredibly dangerous.

It can be confusing to know what we should to do help, but one of the first things we must do is erase the stigma of talking about mental health conditions and suicidal ideation. Here are a couple small changes we can all make to help.

It’s important to familiarize yourself with the warning signs of suicide and to then follow-up with people who are struggling. Asking them specifically, “Are you having thoughts of suicide?” will give your loved one permission to talk about the uncomfortable thoughts and feelings they’ve experienced and make a plan for recovery.

Words matter. Rather than using the phrase “commit suicide,” talk about it as you would any other tragic illness that ends a life, such as “died by suicide.” It’s a small step that can help lessen the isolation felt by surviving family members and friends.

If we start treating mental health conditions with the same openness, practicality, and compassion that we use to address physical conditions, we can prevent more deaths by suicide.

We all have a role to play in suicide prevention in our communities, workplaces, and families. It starts with all of us.

If you or a loved one is having thoughts of suicide, or if you just need someone to talk to, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or the Veterans Crisis Line at 1-800-273-8255 (Press 1). And make sure to let the people in your life know that you care.

Thank you,
Stephanie Davis

Submitted by Paul Davis for Kansas campaign. This is not a paid political ad.

Teeing off: Osage City Golf Course hosts nighttime tournament Saturday

By Richard Burkdoll
Osage City Golf Course President

As the golf year winds down we want to thank everyone that has supported the golf course and helped us improve your course. Extra play and an increase in memberships has helped us out of some of the financial trouble we were in two years ago.  We have 98 members this year, up from 72 just two years ago.

Currently, we need money for fertilizer, seed, and new parts for the irrigation. We are having a fundraiser “Night Golf Tournament” Sept. 15, 2018. The tournament will be a 4-person scramble. Call out to the golf course to reserve your team. (Limited to the first 18 teams).

We have had problems with the irrigation all summer. The fairways have really greened up with the recent rains. Hopefully, we will get the irrigation fixed so we can have green fairways all of next summer.

In the clubhouse, Randy, pro-shop manager, is selling raffle tickets for a free golf membership for next year, to help raise money.

For more information about the upcoming night tournament or the Osage City Golf Course, call 785-528-3329, or stop by at 1401 S. Fourth St., Osage City, Kan.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Go fast then slow

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“It’s a whole lot easier to speed them up than slow one down.”

Real cowboys have insisted that forever about horses seeming lazy until they learn to move out.

Not true of all, but for many once they’ve found out they can run, it’s really fun.

Now, that’s probably not true for the majority of human populations, as most prefer a relaxed attitude.

Again, there are exceptions. A co-op manager friend used to get up at 4 o’clock and run 10 miles before work. As he matured, getup times the same, but Bobby “only” walks seven-and-a-half miles.

That takes about an hour-and-a-half, and he heads for the office to get a head start on staff. The fellow only gets six hours of sleep a night. “Can’t sleep any more than that,” he claims.

Obviously, the ambitious guy is fit, ordering and eating half what everybody else had for dinner when we got together. Yep, he’s hard to get slowed down like many horses once given liberty to go for it.

Some all-around performance horses will gas up, run their heart out and then come back down calm and collected. Percentage-wise that’s not a great number.

Many riders of pleasure horses, those competing walk, jog, lope in the arena, would never let their mounts run. They’re afraid the horses will like it better than the easy going life. It extends so far as not entering classes with any extensive maneuvers where advance speed is expected.

Most trail riders, those going out for leisure Sunday afternoon walks in the park, are the same way.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Demise for those varmints

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“The rain must have brought out the ’possums.”

That’s sure the way it seemed after catching another cat food stealer in the live trap.

Just after the rains finally started, an opossum started showing up to eat out of the cat food pan.

Inquisitiveness or greed got that one after he finished off the pan and walked into the cage snare for more.

Uncertain exactly what Mr. Opossum’s demise was, but the foreman took care of getting him out of the steel cage.

Then another one of those pointed nosed ugly varmints figured out where the cheap easy tasty food was, too.

Obviously Garfield and Lioness, the two cats who’ve decided to stay around and work for a while, are on full feed. They’d have to be, or there wouldn’t be food left over in their barn pan after suppers over.

Well, sometime during the night, that second ’possum also walked right into the baited cage and the gate snapped shut.

His cousin, maybe a sibling who would know, sure didn’t give any warning about the hazards of snooping around free food. Both were surely sorry for being such gluttonous freeloaders. Leftovers in the cats’ pan would have been enough for one meal, likely better than they’d find in the wild.

It’s not just at the ranch those varmints are showing up. There’ve been more scampering in the roadside ditches, and several others weren’t “playing ‘possum” in the middle of the highways.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Errors must be admitted

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Making mistakes can have very serious consequences.”

Nobody wants to make a mistake, but there isn’t anybody who hasn’t made a mistake.

Certain errors in judgment carry lifetime penalties. That doesn’t necessarily mean going to jail or even public rebuttal, but rather personal unforgiving regret. Sometimes, there’s absolutely nothing that can be done after the fact, other than have to live with oneself.

It’s contended to just “let it go, forget it.” Easy to say that, but such is definitely not possible in some situations.

“Oh, there’s never any need to cry over spilled milk,” reminders are freely given. So very true many times, likely of most wrongdoings, but some things are just different.

Not the most serious error made in a lifetime of many mistakes, a horse killed itself when tied to pout. Similar training techniques worked well previously, and since, but not that specific time. Forever that sad day is reflected, despite trying to forget and go on.

To make advancements, mistakes must be made. Often it’s a trial and error effort, if one way doesn’t work, pitch it, and try something else. Mistakes might even be as essential as doing everything right.

The most important part of blunders is not making the same slipup again. Again, that’s much easier said than done. Sadly, there are some missteps that are made repeatedly. “Will he ever learn?” others have asked.

Perhaps it’s not learning, or even forgetting, maybe force of habit that is incurable. Yet doing what’s right should still be the objective every time.

Another issue comes to forefront at this point, what is right and what is wrong? Opinions can vary widely, one considers an action correct, and it is viewed the opposite by another.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Cure don’t cover it

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Just take a pill, that’ll fix whatever the problem is.”

That advice is prevalent today from whomever or wherever it’s being heard. Be it television commercials, print ads, true friends, family, somebody on the street corner. Even sadly as well from medical professionals, doctors, nurses, and assistants.

Half a century ago for those who had a TV, reflections are that most advertising centered on cigarettes and beer. Some of those were outlawed, even though specific liquors and fake smokes of some sort are being promoted again.

Now, on certain stations, all kinds of medications, mostly what might even be considered miracle pills, are advertised.

For naiveties, it’s difficult to figure out what the drugs are supposed to remedy. Still, almost without exception, there are warnings of seemingly worst consequences from taking the pills.

Well, actually, it’s not even always pills recommended, sometimes there are other methods of getting the advertised healing results. Warnings caution the drugs can cause heart attacks, swelling, headaches, fever, more different hurt, pain someplace else.

Guilty of following directions this time, two handfuls of pills are swallowed every day. Have no idea what most of them are for or called, unlike some who rattle off all the names.

However, there are certain ones that really do work. Legs ache and shoulder hurts take two pills, then sure enough the wrenching throb goes away in just a short time. Can’t help but think it’s imagination, but somehow, someway there’s sure relief for a while.

Catch up with the past at Arvonia

By Susan Atchison

This year has been eventful and much progress has been made at Arvonia by the Arvonia Historic Preservation Society.

January and February began with reflecting on memories of the Christmas tour and Christmas Tea, and planning for 2018 events. March started off strong with the St. David’s Tea in Lebo. Arvonia hosted Eluned Jones, director of the St. David’ Society of Kansas annual concert in Emporia.

On the cold first weekend in April, AHPS hosted several events. On Friday, a PEO chapter from Emporia toured the buildings and held their meeting. Saturday, a group of eight came for a progressive dinner bought at a silent auction benefitting the AHPS last fall. The group progressed from appetizers at the school, soup at the church, followed by the main course at the Humphreys/Atchison house, and dessert at the town hall. All food courses contained food with a Welsh flair. The brave group walked the entire route despite the weather. On Sunday, we hosted a private group tour.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas