Category Archives: Notions

A Cowboy’s Faith: Handicap no life setback

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Now, Keith quit that. Robert what are you doing? You boys better settle down.”

Actually that’s probably not exactly how Sandy said it, but certainly semblance.

That was every Saturday afternoon in the mid ’60s. Mom and the boys did grocery shopping while dad Billy generally went to the weekly sale barn auction.

Came to mind with passing of longtime friend Keith Bacon. Others may not have such vivid recollection of those days, while remaining fond reflections for one former grocery carryout boy.

Typical of Four Mile community farm families, the hardworking Bacons had diversified cropping and livestock operations. Keith and Robert were rambunctious farm boys who didn’t get to town very often.

One wouldn’t know it on the forefront and certainly not let on by him or any of his family. Keith had an incurable disease in joints forcing hospitalization in an urban hospital as a newborn.

Despite what most would consider serious handicap, Keith’s parents were determined the boy live a “normal life.” Nobody was to feel sorry for Keith or him for himself, and no shirking of any farm chores and responsibilities.

That became Keith’s definitely expressed always pleasant energetic positive attitude for life appreciated and respected completely by younger brother Robert.

Eat Well to Be Well: Are you under-consuming these key nutrients?

Let’s start with what many Americans over consume each day – excess sodium, unhealthy fats, and an abundance of overly sugary carbohydrates. This barrage of overabundance over time can be a major detriment to our health. But what about nutrients we under consume, also setting the stage for future health problems? Scientists with the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey* have identified five top nutrients many of us are lacking or what they refer to as “shortfall nutrients.” Let’s take a look at these five nutrients and how a few dietary changes can help make up some of the nutrient shortages:

Calcium – Calcium has the distinction of being the most abundant mineral in our body. It’s necessary for strong bones and teeth, lowers risk of osteoporosis and colon cancer, and may aid in weight loss. Despite the mineral’s importance in the body, many people fall short of the 1,000 to 1,200 milligrams of calcium they need daily. In fact, the average woman consumes only slightly more than half of her daily requirement.

Top tips for boosting intake – Each day, include two to three servings of dairy (cow’s milk, cheese, cottage cheese, and yogurt) or calcium-fortified non-dairy beverages. Dark green leafy vegetables are also high in calcium. However, the human body absorbs more calcium from dairy foods than plant-based foods. Also, more calcium is absorbed from kale and broccoli than from spinach because they have less oxalate. Oxalate is an organic compound found in foods such as spinach that can bind with minerals like calcium carrying it on out the body, preventing some of it from being absorbed.

Fiber – Fiber has a multitude of important roles in our health. It prevents constipation, improves gut and heart health, and may lower the risk of colon cancer. Yet, few Americans are anywhere near meeting the recommended daily allowance. The average person in the U.S. gets about 15-16 grams of fiber daily. Ideally, men should strive for between 30-38 grams of fiber a day while women require between 25-30 grams per day.

Top tips for boosting intake – Begin by replacing white bread with 100 percent whole wheat bread. Have a fruit or vegetable at every meal and snack. Speaking of snacks, choose nuts and seeds for a fiber boost. Add dried or canned beans to soups, stews, taco meat, or to a pasta dish.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Retiring friend amply appreciated

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Hello. Kelly Lenz suggested we call you to come and work for the radio.”

Of course, Kelly had been a longtime friend in the media business and had assisted with personal ranch event promotions.

The surprising opportunity call came exactly a decade ago four days after being fired from previous employment. Assistant farm director Greg Akagi heard that personally defeating news, sharing it with Kelly who made recommendation to radio management.

Initially taken aback, first reaction was quite indecisiveness, yet with prodding interview was scheduled and before long a new job.

It must all be credited to now even closer friend and daily work cohort Kelly Lenz. There’ve been a number of airwave and print reports in recent days about Kelly’s retirement as a farm broadcaster.

That’s after a remarkable career serving agriculture around the world for nearly half a century with 41 years in Kansas.

Mention the name Kelly Lenz anywhere and eyes immediately light up appreciatively, recognizing Kelly for his knowledge and engaging congeniality. That’s from every local farm and ranch home to state, national and worldwide agriculture and political affiliations.

More than four decades Kelly was up at 4 o’clock, soon live on the radio reporting analyzing agriculture news and markets. Leaders in every phase of the industry, government programs and decision making were interviewed willingly trusting sharing with Kelly.

Help House News: Goodbye summer, hello fall

By Raylene Quaney

Saying goodbye to summer, Help House thanks everyone that has contributed in one way or another to help make this another successful summer. Beginning with our huge garage sale in June, the Summer Fan Club, the school supplies give away and our very popular silent auctions, we have been very busy. The Summer Fan Club gave out 49 fans. School supplies were given out to 85 children who did not have an opportunity to sign up with ECKAN or receive supplies from Grace Community Church or other school supply resources for the upcoming school year.

The silent auction donors and winning bidders raised $1,205.51 at Melvern Sunflower Days, and $2,788.18 on Aug. 10, during the Overbrook Osage County Fair. These are our two largest fundraisers of the year and will help provide food for about three months for the more than 200 families that depend on the Help House food pantry to supplement their nutritional needs each month.

The crocheted flag, made and donated by Peggy Kampsen, was raffled off and the winner drawn during the Overbrook fair. The winner was Louise Michael, of Topeka. A total of $884.00 was raised through this very gracious gift. We thank you for helping your Osage County neighbors.

Clean, gently worn coats needed

Help House’s next effort for assistance is the sixth annual coat drive and giveaway. We began taking donations for clean and gently worn coats on Sept. 3. Infants and children’s coats are always in short supply, so if your children have coats they have outgrown but are still in good condition, please consider sharing with another child who may not have a coat for this winter. We also need men’s and women’s coats in all sizes. Also coveralls or overalls for those who have to work outside in the weather, and hats and gloves for everyone. The coat closet will be open Oct. 1-31, during regular business hours.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Early start to longevity

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Passing his farmhouse nearly every morning Monday through Friday, 6:30 to 7:15, for 48 years, he was always up working.

“Returning home, each of those days he was still going strong every afternoon 5:15 to 5:45.”

In the past month, his car wasn’t always in the garage, morning lights weren’t on, he wasn’t apparent at work.

Then the story was printed in the hometown weekly, personal hero Leroy Fechner passed away at 95 years of age.

At such admirable maturity passing probably shouldn’t be too unexpected but the news sent cringing recoil.

The lifelong bachelor cattleman, former renowned quality seed stock breeder merchandizer, conservation-minded crop grower, most ambitious, twinkling-eyed farmer seemed insurmountable.

One felt he’d surely live forever, and probably Leroy’s opinion was likewise such – whenever visiting conversation centered on future plans.

There’d been a couple setbacks in the past decade or so with body injury from farm-ranch work. Seriously out of commission at times forced to live away from his lifetime home some, Leroy always returned.

Back full force ahead, Leroy was checking cows, feeding backgrounders, operating farm equipment, driving slowly down the highway ranchland gazing.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Congenial service is appreciated

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Greenbacks are the best way to do business.”

The old boss insisted that paper money is the safest and most accurate way to handle payment and receipt transactions.

That was probably 40 years ago the comment was made. Certainly, the truly smart man always had a billfold seeming full of folding bills to buy our Monday dinner.

Have remembered the statement occasionally through time, it definitely came back after a recent horseshow. Headed out of town, the gas gauge was below half as pulled into the filling station. Sure didn’t want to run out and have to ride one horse and lead the other to the ranch.

Heart sank when pulled the billfold out of the glovebox and there was no credit card. Of course, the first thing running through the mind was “What happened to it?”

Couldn’t remember last time it was used or where could have lost it. But, realization soon dawned the biggest immediate concern was paying for pickup gasoline.

Unlike the former employer, cash hasn’t been a form of paying for much of anything for several decades. Seems like if there happens to be any real hard dough readily available it’s usually spent for something unnecessary.

However, oddly and coincidently this time a twenty dollar bill was folded up in the hideaway.

Actually paying for gasoline with cash isn’t even that easy to do anymore. Most clerks get a concerned look whenever currency is brought out to pay for anything.

SOS campaign highlights organization’s strengths and successes

Statement from SOS:

As a nonprofit organization, we are so very grateful to have the support of our community and friends. Another successful SOS Strong campaign has come and gone, all made possible by the selfless efforts of these distinguished men. SOS is excited to announce these amazing individuals collected over $23,000 for our organization, in addition to raising an invaluable amount of public awareness for the clients we serve. Thank you to everyone who participated and supported this initiative.

The spotlight has felt bright for SOS recently, showcasing all the hard work our staff does behind the scenes, as we received some great recognition at the Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence 16th Annual Awards Ceremony. Over 160 people from across Kansas and eight other states gathered together for this event and SOS was honored to receive two of the four awards presented. SOS Strong was awarded Project of the Year, and Osage County Advocate Teresa Oliver was awarded Advocate of the Year. Teresa and her team do amazing work for our clients. For over a decade, Teresa has helped thousands of domestic violence and sexual assault victims learn how to heal in the aftermath of abuse. These awards reflect countless hours of dedication, for which we are immensely proud of their teamwork.

In addition to being recognized by our peers in the industry, we are equally humbled to be respected by our local communities as well. SOS was voted Best Nonprofit Group for the third consecutive year by the Emporia Gazette Readers’ Choice Awards. This is one of our favorite awards to receive because it speaks to the partnership that has formed between SOS and the numerous lives our organization interacts with on a daily basis. We sincerely cherish this relationship.

It is always hard to share survivor stories because of the emotional nature of our work; personal struggles which are heartbreaking, yet so inspiring to so many in need. We thank you for recognizing the sacrifices our staff make to serve others, as well as the leadership and commitment necessary for supporting the mission we so passionately strive to fulfill. What can often be a pretty dark world becomes brighter knowing we have a community full of survivors, thrivers, donors, volunteers and ambassadors. Your recognition of our efforts truly brings a refreshing light we all need from time to time.

From all of us at SOS, thank you for your continued support and heartfelt appreciation. We couldn’t do this without you.

Hidden History: No memorial for Civil War medic, Burlingame schoolchildren’s caretaker

An undated postcard view of Lincoln School, Burlingame, Kan. From the collection of Gary Lowman.

Christopher Columbus Ragin, or “Crit” as his friends called him, was born into slavery around 1855, near Atlanta, Georgia. His mother died when he was about four years old, his father was not even a memory to him.

In the summer of 1864, Union forces were converging on Atlanta to seize the city. After the battle of Atlanta in July of that year, Crit and nearly 18,000 other slaves left the local plantations and were conscripted into the armed services as contrabands (former slaves freed by Union troops).

A nine-year-old Crit was picked up by the 27th Ohio Volunteer Infantry (OVI), a part of the 17th Army Corps, and given duties around headquarters. He was given a uniform, and quickly proved himself to be a valuable asset. Crit stated that he was eventually earning as much as the regular Army.

His duties to the company included being an assistant to Dr. John L. Chapel, assistant surgeon for the 27th OVI. Dr. Chapel had started studying medicine at the age of 15, and had gained a degree in medicine prior to the war. Dr. Chapel and Crit’s retrieval of the wounded at the front lines of the war was at times a dangerous occupation, and Crit would exclaim, “I won’t get killed if you don’t!”

After the war, the bond of friendship caused Dr. Chapel and Crit to remain close, and the doctor took Crit into his home in Ohio. When Dr. Chapel married and moved to another state, Crit stayed behind, and found a home with Wellington “W.D.” Canfield.

In 1873, Canfield chose to move with his family to Burlingame, Kansas, and convinced Crit to come with him.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Maturity changes romantic passions

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Been there, done that and no real desire to do it again.”

While philosophy has long been that people never change, they actually can and do in some ways.

What was formerly a “romance,” although some folks don’t understand that terminology preferably describing such as a “passion,” can become unimportant. That is, not completely irrelevant yet certainly unnecessary and unessential for a happy life.

There can be endeavors with such heartfelt attachment one feels they can’t or wouldn’t really want to live without. Yet in reality “this too shall pass” as “time changes everything.”

Forever desiring to be a cowboy in every positive definition of such, certain characteristics just automatically become part of it.

After getting that first horse, a mare, not atypical to many, she was mated and raised a foal. Over four decades that meager beginning developed into a major horse breeding program. Never raising 40 colts a year, the operation approached that level to become known, with demand for production. It was a “romance.”

Eat Well to Be Well: A+ after-school snacks enhance kids’ health

Summer is almost over with a new school year about to begin. You’ve bought new book bags, shoes, and school supplies to start your child’s school year off right.  But there’s one other important component enhancing your child’s school success and health – healthy after-school snacks.

The importance of after-school snacks

Who doesn’t remember coming home from school hungry and looking for something to eat? Children of today are no different. Keeping nutritious after-school snacks on hand allows kids of all ages the perfect opportunity to enrich their growth and nutritional needs.

As parents, we are responsible for forming our kids’ snack habits.  Think of the after-school snack as a mini-meal.  Healthy, nutritious snacks are a far smarter way to fill them up instead of offering overly-refined foods such as chips or Cheetos. Smart snack choices can provide key nutrients like fiber, iron, and protein that may otherwise be lacking in some kids’ diets.

The idea is to fuel your kids’ brains providing an energy boost while satisfying their hunger cravings helping them achieve academic success. For those participating in sports, busy student athletes will be wise to choose nutritious snacks supporting energy for growth and athletic performance. When smart snack choices are frequently made, this not only develops good eating habits, but also enjoyment of wholesome foods.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Correct tightness means safety

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Watch out, your girth broke.”

That was the initial sideline scream from more than one at conclusion of a good pole bending run.

“Get off before your saddle turns and you fall off.” Sincere concerned advice came from the gateman.

Confused by all the goings-on, glance down to the saddle billet verified it was gone. Only the back cinch was loosely intact holding saddle on the high-withered old Palomino Cody.

Cautious dismount was made to ground safety as the saddle remained upright for evaluation of what the whole predicament entailed.

It was a weird deal, really, although the front cinch had been tightened to the usual hole. However, evidently as the fast lean horse stretched out on the straightaway home, the girth became loose enough to unhook itself.

A spectator congenially picked the off-billet up out of the arena and brought it to the trailer. Nothing was broken period, as the back cinch, centered rider and the horse’s back kept saddle upright.

Luckily no tack had to be repaired, but the girth was definitely pulled one hole tighter for the next run. It’s even been taken up another notch after a couple runs.

Pulling the cinch is the most important part of saddling up. Such a simple action it would seem. But actually getting the right snugness to suit the horse, the rider and the expectations are somewhat complex.

Eat Well to Be Well: Simply sidestep metabolic syndrome

Results from your annual physical were not the best – high cholesterol, elevated blood sugar, high blood pressure – should you be concerned? Yes. You may have a condition called metabolic syndrome that can erupt into multiple health worries. The good news is making lifestyle changes can significantly blunt the advancement of this health problem. But what is metabolic syndrome and how would you know if you have it?

Understanding metabolic syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions significantly increasing your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. If you have this condition, it’s not a matter of if you will have a heart attack or stroke; it’s a matter of when.

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, there are five conditions considered to be risk facts for metabolic syndrome: high blood pressure, high fasting blood sugar, abnormally high triglyceride levels, a low HDL cholesterol level (good cholesterol), and excess body fat around the waist (waist measurement or circumference). Below are the criteria for each of these conditions indicating if you are at risk:

  • Blood pressure – equal to or greater than 130/85 mmHg.
  • Fasting blood sugar – greater than 100 mg/dl.
  • Triglycerides – equal to or greater than 150 mg/dl.
  • HDL cholesterol – equal to or less than 50 mg/dl for women or equal to or less than 40 mg/dl for men.
  • Waist circumference – equal to or greater than 35 inches for women or equal to or greater than 40 inches for men.

Anyone with at least three or more of the risk factors has metabolic syndrome. Currently, a whopping 34 percent of American adults have metabolic syndrome, up from 25 percent two decades ago. And just recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has found that the gains made in improving death rates from heart disease and strokes have stalled, which is driving down life expectancy in the U.S. This is after decades when Americans could expect to live longer than the generation before them.

Help House News: Jerry’s makes it easy to help your Osage County neighbors

By Raylene Quaney

Beginning Aug. 1, Jerry’s Thriftway, Osage City, will be participating in an ongoing fundraising effort for the Help House food pantry. We are very grateful to the Giesy family and Jerry’s Thriftway for helping us with this campaign. Help House serves over 200 households a month and our budget is being stretched thin, so we hope when you shop for yourself you might spare a little and share with others in need. You will see at the register a card that will read: “You may now make a donation to Help House for the Food Pantry by asking the clerk to add either $1 or $5 to the total of your bill.” It is that easy and we thank everyone for your continued support and donations.

Help House’s year to date total of households served through the food pantry as of July 9, 2019, was 1,234. This number continues to grow weekly and monthly. The needs of those we serve throughout Osage County are evident in those numbers.

We do receive non-corporate donations (in kind) of food and non-food items from churches, other civic and school groups, and individuals, and they are a great help. In May we had 707 food items and 879 non-food items, and in June 385 food items and 340 non-food items.

Mobile food pantries

Mobile food pantry dates:

  • Carbondale, 12 p.m. second Tuesday, Aug. 13, at Carbondale Church of Christian Fellowship.
  • Melvern, 12:30 p.m. third Thursday,  Aug. 15 at Melvern Community Center.
  • Burlingame, 10 a.m. third Thursday, Aug. 15, Burlingame Federated Church.
  • Lyndon, 12 p.m. third Friday, Aug. 16, at Jones Park on East Sixth Street.

If participating in the mobile pantry, please be in line 15-20 minutes before starting time to be counted for determining how much of each item each family will receive. Help House sponsors the Lyndon and Carbondale mobile pantries.

Consumer Corner: Protect your personal information on the heels of Equifax settlement

By Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt

Last week, our office announced that, along with 49 other states and jurisdictions across the county, we have reached a settlement with Equifax over the largest data breach in the history of the United States. Our investigation found that Equifax’s failure to maintain a reasonable security system enabled hackers to penetrate its systems, exposing the data of 56 percent of American adults – including 1.1 million Kansans.

Our consumer protection division takes seriously our responsibility to ensure all companies that hold Kansans’ personal information fulfill their legal duties to protect it. Securing last week’s settlement was especially important because of the sheer number of people who were affected. All Kansans should inquire with the settlement administrator about whether their information was put at risk and whether they are eligible for consumer restitution as a result. Here’s how:

Hidden History: Incognito contest winner shines perpetual spotlight on Overbrook

Mindy Allen, Scott City, Kan., recently completed a new painting of the “Don’t Overlook Overbrook” mural.

“Don’t Overlook Overbrook.” More than a hundred years ago, this memorable slogan was created, but even today will spark strangers to recognition when the town’s name is mentioned.

In 1911, the village of Overbrook was joining a nationwide trend of growth across the country during this period. “Boosters” sought to boost their communities by increasing the visibility and appeal, acquiring utilities to improve the living conditions in their towns, and bring commerce and new citizens. Of course, not everyone was happy with prospects for change, folks content with the status quo and speaking out against any change were dubbed “knockers.”

Overbrook’s booster group was called the Overbrook Commercial Club. This club put out a call for a slogan. Topeka had decided on a slogan “Topeka can, Topeka will.” Overbrook was quick to follow the example, and added an incentive of $5 paid to the person who supplied the chosen phrase.

The winning submission was made by Lewis Coffman, a West Virginia resident who had two brothers in Overbrook. He sent the motto to the Commercial Club under the pseudonym “Mary”, since he lived outside of the 20-mile radius required for submissions. However, the club was so pleased with the line that they gave Coffman not only the $5 award, but voted that he receive a lifetime membership to the club.

Coffman accepted, stating it was “impossible to overlook Overbrook anyway. It was too good of a town.”

A Cowboy’s Faith: Cowboys sleep wherever they can

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“I don’t see how you can sleep or get any rest like that.”

More than one made such comment at the last horse show where riders stay overnight by the arena.

“Did you get a good night’s sleep?” is a rather frequent good morning greeting. Yet, it sometimes seems to be said with a bit of sneering, jiving tone rather than complete congeniality.

Remarks are actually being made in regard to the old cowboy’s slumbering arrangements. No arguing they’re quite different than the other couple dozen bedroom accommodations away from home.

Century-and-a-half-ago cowboys trailing herds from grazing lands to railroad towns for terminal shipping slept on the ground at night. There was no alternative, generally with saddle as pillow, a blanket as cover, maybe jacket was pulled on towards morning.

Early day rodeo cowboys tell stories with semblance often camping out at the arena as there wasn’t money for motels.

When horse shows gained popularity mid-last-century, most riders were country people enjoying the weekend family sporting entertainment. Trailers were almost non-existent early on with horses hauled in pickups or small flatbed trucks.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Name and score essential

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“You don’t have the voice to be a rodeo or horseshow announcer.”

It wasn’t exactly those words but close semblance about a decade ago in a straightforward passing conversation.

That may be correct, likely is actually. So no response was made to the remark not said to be rude – honest evaluation from a professional broadcaster.

The opinion was given in response about intentions to announce an upcoming ranch rodeo advertised on the radio.

Regardless of abilities to do such, that rodeo was announced without any negative feedback. It was “just another one” as there were a lot before and a number since that performance.

While announcing a recent ranch rodeo, reflection was when such duties began in the fall of 1969. It was a hometown high school rodeo helping over the weekend during college because the only one who would.

There’ve been a lot of rodeo and horseshow announcing duties since that meager beginning when still a teenager.

Far from being true professional like Clem McSpadden, Roger Mooney, Kyle Elwood and several others visited with through the eons. Certainly not even close to topnotch amateur rodeo announcers Jerry Taylor or Max Stowell back in the day. Amazing inspiring how they could remember certain rides, contestants, and livestock from long before.

Yet for 50 years the microphone has been in hand from the “crow’s nest” calling Western action. Oh yes they’ve all been pretty much local yokel affairs. That’s said tongue in cheek definitely not wanting to offend committeemen who give their all for successful arena action.

A Cowboy’s Faith: A time for everything

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“It never was that way before.”

The comment rang appropriate truth not just subject at hand but seemingly everything nowadays.

Conversation related to several dump truckloads of creek gravel in a big yard pile for spreading on the driveway.

Ruts and potholes in the barnyard entrance needed filled and smoothed again. Be interesting to know how many times that’s been done in a half century, nearly 48 years home place.

Simpler than days gone by as the ranch manager son is talented operating tractor with frontend loader leveling the roadway.

What brought the subject up was cleaning old hay out of the pole storage barn, coupled with downpours.

The barn held standing water with big ruts in front. Even deeper water bogged furrows in the lean-to where the square baler is stored. Gravel will make a base again.

Winter cow lots don’t have a bottom without gravel for solidity. However, those bovine, their calves, sometimes other cattle and horses year around leave droppings accumulating to necessitate regular cleanup.

With loader tractor and manure spreader, wastes go on nearby brome field. That again leaves low spots in the corrals and accompanying pens which must also be filled with gravel and smoothed out.

Never before, at least in lifetimes, have some seen so much rain causing such havoc in so many directions. Likewise, when Mother Nature wields additional detrimental acts hopefully one has not experienced and never does again.

Help House News: Volunteers bring success to spring benefit sale

By Raylene Quaney

Help House’s benefit garage sale June 14 and 15, 2019, was a success thanks to more than 30 volunteers under the planning and organization of Lois Shuck. Help House would like to thank the Osage City Fair Board for renting us their big tent once again. With the rain and wind Friday morning, it would not have been possible to hold the sale without it, we’re so grateful for shelter from the storm.

Mobile food pantries

Mobile food pantry dates: Melvern mobile pantry, 12:30 p.m. on the third Thursday, July 18, at the Melvern Community Center; Burlingame, 10 a.m. third Thursday, July 18, at Burlingame Federated Church; Lyndon, 12 p.m. third Friday, July 19, at Jones Park on East Sixth Street. Those participating in the mobile pantry are asked to be in line 15 to 20 minutes before starting time to be counted to determine how much of each item each family will receive. Osage City will not have a mobile pantry this month.

Help House assists with SNAP application

Help House volunteers are available to provide assistance for those who apply for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Applicants need proof of identification, social security information for each member of the household, income verification each member of the household (a most recent bank statement will be copied and sent in with application), also required, any owned vehicle information, and if 60 or older or disabled, any medical expenses including health insurance and Medicare premiums and prescription costs or bills due. Please call the office at 785-828-4888 to make an appointment.  Appointments need to be scheduled between 10 a.m. and 12 p.m. Allow at least one hour for the application process.

Summer Fan Club

The Summer Fan Club has been giving out fans to those who have signed up. We still have several families in need, so if you have a used fan in good condition or would like to purchase a fan to be given away, you may drop them off during our regular hours. Please do not leave donated fans in the shed out back. If you would like to make a cash donation for us to purchase the fans for you, checks may be made out to Help House and sent to PO Box 356, Lyndon KS 66451. Make a note in the memo section “Fan Club”.

Eat Well to Be Well: Why choosing cow’s milk still matters

Going to the grocery store to “get milk,” is not always what it used to mean. Open up the refrigerator in many homes, and the “milk” might instead be a nondairy milk alternative. From soymilk, almond, coconut, rice, cashew, oat, hemp, quinoa, or hazelnut, just to name a few, cow’s milk has competition.

Traditional cow’s milk still dominates the milk market, but research shows that U.S. nondairy milk sales are growing, causing cow’s milk sales to sag. Nondairy milk alternatives have gained popularity among consumers. But are nondairy milk alternatives as healthy for us as cow’s milk and why are consumers dropping dairy milk for plant-based alternative milks anyway?

Reasons for the switch to nondairy milk alternatives

The consumer consumption switch on buying more nondairy milk alternatives is being fueled for several reasons:

  • People with a milk allergy have a safe alternative to cow’s milk.
  • People with lactose intolerance – however, dairy milk manufacturers make some varieties of cow’s milk with the lactose already broken down.
  • People who are vegans and consume no animal products.
  • People who have health concerns over consuming dairy milk believing it is fattening or unhealthy.
  • There is public perception that nondairy milk alternatives are healthier than dairy milk.
  • Some consumers question modern milk production practices.

How does the nutritional profile of cow’s milk compare to plant-based milks? This is where it is very important for consumer’s to read the nutrition facts label on all types of nondairy milk alternatives. While it’s tempting to follow the trend of drinking plant-based milk alternatives, before deserting cow’s milk, know the nutritional differences between them.

Let’s be clear, cow’s milk is still the gold standard with a high nutritional profile for several reasons:

A Cowboy’s Faith: Rains bring more intruders

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.Ample moisture is better than a drought. Yet with continuing downpours come forever increasing problems.

Of course, flooding is the horrific detriment with such extensive physical and financial losses.

Rainfall is essential for crop production if seed gets planted, doesn’t rot or wash away, and remaining growth cycle cooperates. All things considered, water at the right time in appropriate amounts is the biggest attributing factor to yields.

Grasslands are green, lush and already stirrup high on a stocky ranch horse with promise of ample grazing and hay. Enhanced conditions for desirable plants also have intruders growing at record pace. Every kind of weed imaginable is popping up out of nowhere.

The list is extensive but most apparent in recent days has been musk thistle abundancy. Big purple blooms blowing in the wind might seem pretty to lay people not realizing detriments of the noxious weed.

Right out the office window one five-foot-tall thistle glowed in the sunlight. Fortunately, the yard keeper sprayed poison, and the “pretty flower” wilted away. However, the sticky weeds are rampant not just on agriculture ground but everywhere.

Dozens of thistles blooming brilliantly were all around the arena fence at a recent horse show on state property. Evidently, managers don’t understand thistles are weeds that government regulations prohibit to the extent of fines if not controlled.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas