Category Archives: Notions

A Missions Project Story: Through the hearts of children

By Audrey Cop

How does a small group of children at a little church in a little town called Melvern, Kansas, serve God in a really big way in the world? In this instance it happened through a missions project that started in the hearts and minds of a handful of children in a small Sunday school class, in a small local church.

Around the first part of August 2018, several children at the Melvern United Methodist Church Sunday school class came up with an idea to help people in Africa have safe drinking water for their families. The children had learned that many of the young children in these countries were dying from diseases caused by contaminated water. The parents have no source of water to provide for their children – other than the contaminated rivers and streams around them. So, the children started giving their Sunday school donations to a designated clean water project just for this purpose.

Then, the idea expanded to include the children, age kindergarten through fifth grade, at that church’s weekly after-school ministry, called “The ROCK”. The program’s name stands for Reaching Out to Christ’s Kids. This program is available to all children in the area, regardless of whether they attend that church; it meets after school on Wednesday evenings. Then there were about 20 total children involved in the missions’ project.

The children’s group decided to expand their clean water project to include sustainable food sources for people in Africa. The children had also learned how so many other children are hungry and malnourished because there is not enough food for these families. They expanded the mission project to include purchasing chickens for eggs and dairy animals for milk and cheese to provide to the families. The families could consume the eggs, milk and cheese and sell any excess food to provide much needed additional income for their families.

As a group, we prayed for God to bless this project and help us raise the money to help those in need. The children set a goal of $500 to be reached by April 2019.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Cowboy never slept in

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“I’ve always liked to get up early, there was always lots of work that I needed and wanted to do.”

Generally the day started way before daylight, horse waiting at the gate to be saddled and off to pasture work.

Cowboy has always been his first profession, although Kenny Muller certainly has been successful in many agriculture endeavors.

Slowed down a bit the cowboy still rises at dawn anxious to pursue plans in his sharp forever active mind.

Family was joined by friends of a lifetime for Kenneth Muller’s 90th birthday celebration. Most know him as Kenny.

Moved from the ranch to town residence, it’s been awhile since horseback, but the pickup gets daily use. Conversation always centers on heartfelt cowboy life in the Flint Hills.

Kenny was a grocery store carryout boy’s first and always hero-idol-mentor; wanted to be a cowboy just like him.

Perfect image always properly shaped hat, clean cut, sharp dressed, friendly, outgoing with saddled horse in the trailer.

In high demand for day work, Kenny assisted cattle owners over a wide area with roundup, branding, whatever needed.

Horsepower is essential for top cowboys and Kenny always rode the best. Whether cutting a stray from the herd or roping a sick one for doctoring, his horse knew the job. They were ranch raised result of Kenny’s horse breeding program headed by top stallion power.

Proof of quality came first with local winnings followed by recognition nationwide. Kenny’s horses claimed halter championships then as pleasure riders soon earning reining and cow work awards. Collecting trophy saddles, Kenny put them to good use in his life’s trade.

Help House News: Start stocking up now for Souper Bowl Sunday

By Raylene Quaney

Now that we are into a new year it is time for Help House’s annual Souper Bowl Soup-A-Thon. We encourage churches, school organizations, youth groups, civic organizations, businesses to get involved. See which group can collect the most number of items to be donated to the Help House Food Pantry. We suggest organizations collect cans of soup and boxes of crackers, each counts as one item. Set a basket or tub out in your entryway, by your front door, or ask members to bring an item or two when they attend a game or a meeting. Send your members out into their neighborhoods to collect.

The winners will receive one of three awards, a silver, bronze or gold ladle, which is returned the next year to be passed along to the next winners, along with recognition in Help House’s newsletter. So start collecting now, and the contest will end on Feb. 3, 2019, Super Bowl Sunday. Soup and crackers collections can be brought to Help House the following week to be counted and entered into the contest.

Volunteers make the difference

During the Help House annual board meeting in November a number of volunteers were recognized for their dedication. John Neill received volunteer of the year award after giving 340.75 hours of his time to serve others at Help House in 2018. Additional awards were given to those donating over 200 hours, including Lance Jones, with 220.5 hours, and Raylene Quaney, 286 hours. Those with more than 100 hours were Joetta Asbury, Patty Colson, Carolyn Hamman, Joan Hazelton, Ted Hazelton, Ann Hladky, Lisa May, and Bev Russo-Willard. As we have said many times we could not open our doors without our amazing volunteers. Collectively, 6,128 hours were given during 2018 by more than 115 volunteers.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Jake dedicated to rodeo

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Roll ’em. Come on. Get down on that bull. Put your legs down.”

Jake must have said that a jillion times in his lifelong loving career as a rodeo stock contractor.

The show must go on, no wannabe cowboy wimping around. Chutegate could just open ready or not.

“The Rodeo and Sale Barn World has lost a great man. John B. “Jake” Jacobsen, 89, rural Delia, passed away Saturday, Dec. 15, 2018, at his home.”

Obituary opening is the most accurate description one could ever make.

Many have wanted to be rodeo contractors, but none had the business closer to their heart than Jake.

He lived, literally, to produce rodeos with the best livestock for a quality family show.

It’s been more than four decades, but like right now. Rodeo announcer Max Stowell introducing, Jake always rode in the grand entry.

When the national anthem concluded, Jake headed to the bucking chutes, unmounted, bareback riders better be ready.

Jake always opened the chutegate for the rough stock events, no cowboy piddling, rodeo spectators wanted action.

A family business, Jacobsen Rodeo Company contracted rodeos in Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska and Oklahoma. Their small trailer house was home as they’d arrive with livestock two days ahead of rodeo time.

Welcome smile drooling lip of snuff, always a bit round, Jake with Pearl, Dale and Sis were friends of everybody.

Nothing makes a rodeo producer grin wider than his livestock bettering cowboys.

Jake beamed to one champion bronc rider, “I don’t know how many you’ve ridden. But, I can tell you every one that bucked you off.”

A Cowboy’s Faith: Kindness is most important

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.Life’s changes for betterment ahead are the optimistic blueprint many consider at year’s end.

Annual resolutions are being developed and revised so they won’t be short lived as always before.

Listed for majority are make more money, diet, increase exercise, lose weight and live healthier.

Frequent others include manage debt improving finances, enhance family relations, become higher educated, get a better job, and reduce stress.

Without exception, New Year’s resolutions will be broken, but if only one is partially fulfilled it’s better than before.

Regardless of personal philosophies about all of the vast annual hype of the season, let’s help somebody now.

What else is there in life other than health, happiness and eternity than doing for each other, sincerely?

This is actually very easy, quite simple, yet more uncommon all of the time.

Why not try to make life better for another? Talk to more and different people, even strangers on the street. With few exceptions people like to talk and for others to know about themselves.

Ask how their life truly is? Then listen, look them square in the eye, be interested, and be concerned if there’s that need.

Then, comment, offer thoughts, even suggestions, perhaps points for guidance if sought in the least form.

Make a telephone call to an acquaintance of long ago, or a neighbor living alone, perhaps in an assisted care facility.

Everybody just loves to get mail in the box, write a note, and send a card. It’ll make a day and a memory never ceasing. Go ahead send a text, an email, or other social media to make contact.

Hidden History: The Kid, The Pimp, and the Osage City lawman

By Wendi Bevitt

Osage County had a crime problem. It was the summer of 1883, and hardly a town in the county was untouched by some sort of criminal activity. The economic and population boom brought by the railroads and the coal mines had also brought a surge of individuals looking to make a profit via unsavory means.

Burglars, also known as “sneak thieves”, frequently broke into residences, and horse thieves were plentiful. Citizens were encouraged to protect themselves, which led to the formation of vigilance committees or posses to protect towns and retrieve stolen goods.

Town streets at night were hazardous for pedestrians. The dark was cover for those who wanted to disappear into its shadow. People of questionable character would gather on both sides of the sidewalk, singing, whistling and swearing at passersby. Street walkers and prostitutes were common. Respectable women, in particular, were afraid to walk on the streets at night for fear of being harassed.

Frequent lawbreakers became infamous in the county papers. Johnson, “The Pimp”, and his one woman employee wandered from town to town searching for clients, frequenting the streets and local establishments to the point of annoyance. He and others of the same profession would also take up residences at vacated properties for seclusion.

When Pimp Johnson set up a tent along Salt Creek as his headquarters, a public outcry went out to push them into the creek, promising the support of the community for the people following through with disposing of the couple.

Another character known as “The Kid” was a gentleman gambler that dressed in the highest style, from his matching clothes to his fine gloves. The Kid, like Pimp Johnson, would patronize the saloons and other establishments that allowed gambling. The Kid’s amiable nature gave him a certain leeway with the authorities, and when he and his friends were locked up, they would sing, dance and cause such a commotion that houses neighboring the jail would be kept awake until the wee hours of the night.

While most of the county’s towns were affected by this crime wave and used their best attempts at law enforcement, Osage City’s law officer stood out as an example of the quintessential lawman of the time. Marshal Jack Williams worked hard to control the undesirable element within the Osage City limits.

Marshal Williams assumed the office of Osage City marshal in 1880. He was fair, just, and a strict enforcer of the law. Williams wasn’t frightened by angry mobs or other men of money and influence that tried to affect his pursuit of enforcing the law and keeping the peace.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Youth tell real story

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Children’s Christmas programs rightly bring out the true meaning of the season.”

With all of the commercialization towards shopping and buying gifts starting before Halloween, reason for Christmas is often completely forgotten.

Likewise, elaborate decorating seems to have gotten out of hand, for lack of a more appropriate description of all the vast lightings. It sure makes the electrical companies happy undoubtedly.

Through all of this Christmas “hype,” there is NO factual recognition of what Christmas is really all about.

In viewing literally hundreds of community and public Christmas decorating, there has been only one notable exception.

A display with a few strings of lights had a small nativity scene. That’s Christmas, celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ, savior of the world, life eternal for all believers.

Used to be, a number of churches would have at least some nativity scene.  That’s a simple manger with Christ child, Mary, Joseph, sheep, donkey, shepherds, and wise men.

Sadly, this year, none have been seen as of yet. Live nativities became popular for a time, but have dropped out of fad as well.

Notable, Saint Francis of Assisi is credited with creating the first live nativity scene in 1223 to cultivate the worship of Christ. He was inspired by his visit to the Holy Land seeing Jesus’ birthplace. The idea motivated communities to stage such portrayals.

Although, Christmas programs are still part of the season’s celebrations, most do not have any inclination of the true reasoning. Modern songs often leave a seemingly waning feeling.

Reflecting, grade school pageants of decades gone by never reflected the true celebration either. Yet, singing brought swinging joy to performers and audience with nostalgic appreciation and familiarity.

Fortunately, a few churches, hopefully more than realized, still host children’s Christmas plays highlighting Jesus’ birth and purpose.

Six decades ago, it was a special heartfelt inspiration portraying a shepherd, wearing night robe, turban and carrying a cane.

Merry Christmas! Happy New Year!

All of us at Osage County News wish you a Merry Christmas and happy and healthy New Year! May you spend the holidays filled with the spirit of the season, and share goodwill with all those in your life.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Cards express season’s sentiments

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.Has the mailman come yet?

That’s a common question around most ranch homes year around. Depending on weather, time of year, flat tires, unforeseeable conditions, it’s not always the same time.

Exclamation of question becomes more emphatic during this season. When the answer is “Yes,” there’s a dash outside regardless of temperature to see if there are any Christmas cards.

Earlier in the month a couple of times returnee’s lower lip drooped. Just a newspaper and another statement were in hand.

Fortunately, it’s picked up from a card or two, maybe a half dozen in recent days. Excitement continues to mount seeing where the envelopes are from and deciding which to open first.

“Don’t rip ’em, be careful, use the letter opener,” scowling orders more than once.

Those from afar with personal addresses get preference of the computerized even sometimes commercialized cards.

A store bought card with just a signature gets a quick once over. When the card is a photograph of the sender, even their family, makes it certainly special. Homemade cards are almost nonexistent nowadays.

The cards with a letter are always read carefully, usually then again. Many are duplicated the same to all on their list, yet informative catchup of the year gone by.

There are still a few with handwritten notes. Maybe just a sentence or two, but sometimes newsy paragraphs. That dairymaid across the section goes all out with several pages of handwriting happenings.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Changing trees remain spiritual

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.Christmas trees have gone through a lot of fads in the past six decades.

All of the specially decorated Christmas tree shows so popular nowadays makes one reflect what has come and gone.

Origin and history of Christmas trees varies widely according to the source, country and time. Generally, Germany is credited with starting today’s Christmas tree tradition in the 16th century, while other reports go back much earlier.

Devout Christians symbolically brought decorated evergreen trees into their homes. A green, thriving tree in the winter reminded people of hope, new and everlasting life promised by Christ’s birth

For a number of years, fir trees served the tradition for many families. Right before Thanksgiving, the produce distributor unloaded an alley full of various sized fir trees at the family grocery store.

They were priced by height, three-footers about a buck. Taller ones went up to $3 for those reaching the ceiling.

A dozen fir trees were displayed for sale at the storefront with persnickety customers carefully evaluating each one. A number of buyers wanted theirs delivered, making a mess in the delivery wagon, or blowing off the top carrier.

Quite differently shaped, most would consider more attractive, pine trees, both long and short needle varieties, increased in popularity. Higher priced, harder to handle, they soon replaced fir trees.

Somebody decided the pine trees ought to be painted, often white, decorated with colored balls enhanced by revolving light.

Aluminum trees came shortly after, displayed semblance to the painted trees.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Ronnie was always there

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“If anything needed to be done, Ronnie would make certain it was completed.”

Just as sure, whatever the task there would be smiles for everybody involved.

Recent passing of Ron Shivers, often referred to as Ronnie, although in his eighth decade, was a very sad loss.

Oh, before going any further, pronunciation of Shivers is identical to spelling, like shivering cold, no long “I.”

Actually impossible to comprehend how diversified Ronnie was and how many different people and functions he assisted.

A hometown newspaper feature most appropriately, accurately, complimentarily identified him: “Mr. Volunteer.”

Among his many diverse talents, Ron was a horseman, active in leadership of several horse show groups He was demanded as a judge at a lot of horseshows for a number of years.

Often, Ronnie would adjudicate the same entries two days in a row; sometimes the same ones the next two-day weekend. That’s a difficult task for the best horsemen, and Ron was always credited as unbiased, completely fair to every participant.

For the first part of his career, starting at an early age, he was a trucker for several companies. Ronnie always pulled the air horn and kept it down whenever passing the ranch no matter the time of day.

Overbrook Overlook: City organizes toy drive to celebrate season of giving

A toy drive is underway to fill the Brookside bus with gifts – any new unwrapped toys are being collected for the family shopping day at ECKAN. Toys are being collected now through Dec. 10 at various drop-off locations at Osage County Dollar General stores, Brookside, Overbrook City Hall, and other Overbrook locations.

Poinsettias

The Santa Fe Trail High School Choir is selling poinsettias to help fund a choir trip to St. Louis. These beautiful flowers will add holiday cheer to your home and make great gifts. Poinsettias may be purchased at Overbrook City Hall, or order by calling or texting Lari Jarrett at 785-424-3954.

Rotary Pancake Breakfast

Come to the Overbrook Methodist Church 7-10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 8, for a hearty breakfast. Rotary is serving all you can eat pancakes and sausage with orange juice, coffee, and milk, for a suggested donation of $5. Proceeds support community and organizational events of the Overbrook Rotary Club.

Overbrook Community Christmas Program

Come one! Come all! To the Overbrook Community Christmas Program. Santa will be there! There will be free hot chocolate and cookies donated by the Friends of the Library. Enjoy listening to holiday music by the Santa Fe Trail High School Choraliers. Hop on a wagon ride. All gather together at the Overbrook Public Library at 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 8, to celebrate this wonderful Christmas Season with family, friends and loved ones. Everyone is invited.

Small Town Drama live on stage

The Overbrook Library Foundation presents “A Christmas Carol” Radio Play performed by The Small Town Drama Club at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Dec. 14 and 15, at the Overbrook United Methodist Church, 1005 Maple St. Tickets cost $5 with the dessert reception included. Purchase tickets at the Overbrook Library or at the door. Come enjoy homemade soups from 5:30-6:30 p.m. prior to the play for a freewill donation. For more information, call Debra Jones, 785-224-3616.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Free delivery twice daily

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.A grocery store delivery boy knows every house and every street in the rural town to get there.

Oh, don’t ever ask what the name of the street is, that’s really insignificant. But, those back alleys with the gravel are usually the best and easiest to get to most homes.

Front doors are visitor’s entrance, but the back door generally leads onto the porch right into the kitchen. That’s the best route to deliver groceries.

When parents run a grocery store, the son is expected to do everything there is to be done. From the time could walk would always go with Dad delivering groceries.

Morning delivery was at 10:30, so customers had what they needed for dinner. Afternoon delivery, at 5 o’clock, arrived before supper.

At least three deliveries were made on Saturday, because the store was always closed Sunday. Another run was often made during holiday weekends, or just if somebody called and wanted groceries.

Most days the delivery wagon was packed full with orders. Sometimes there just wasn’t enough room for everything with several filled boxes going to one home.

So those on the west side of town went first, and then back for deliveries east of the Neosho River bridge. Wednesday deliveries sometimes only had half dozen orders twice a day.

First delivery wagon remembered was a cream-colored Kaiser. It was replaced by a specially ordered 1957 Chevrolet panel wagon complete with rear wings. Turquoise in color, broad side panels had big bright red lettering advertising: “Buchman’s Grocery, Free Delivery Twice Daily, Call 410.”

Make contributions count on Giving Tuesday and throughout holiday season

By Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt

Black Friday and Cyber Monday have been joined on the calendar by a more recent addition: Giving Tuesday. The Tuesday after Thanksgiving is marked as a special date for charitable organizations to raise funds as part of the holiday season. While many Kansans are generous in supporting worthy causes throughout the year, the holidays in particular are a time to remember those causes we choose to support.

As we often remind folks, though, don’t let a heartwarming sales pitch from a charitable organization cause you to let your guard down. Scam artists are known to take advantage of the generosity of others to make money that doesn’t support a worthy cause, but simply lines their own pocketbooks.

The best thing you can do to protect yourself from falling victim to a charity scam is to start out your holiday giving with a plan. Make a budget of how much you would like to give and which organizations you wish to support. Don’t wait for the phone to ring or the solicitation email to show up in your inbox and catch you unprepared.

Most charities soliciting in Kansas are required to register with the Secretary of State’s office.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Warm days will come

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“It’s cold outside, inside, everywhere.”

Always very thin blooded and chilly when others are comfortable, the past week has seen even those folks complaining.

“Turn up the heat, Rick,” was the serious comment to the office engineer.

“It’s on high. Nothing else we can do,” he responded.

Sweaters and coats too were common attire throughout the building with conversations centering on low room temperature.

Purple hands made slower moving fingers that a couple of women countered with thin gloves enabling business to get done.

“Get a desk heater,” somebody advised. A couple of cubbyhole sales ladies took the advice to heart creating the warmest spot in the building.

Then the email came, “Parts are in, and the furnace repairmen are coming in the morning.”

They did, and the room thermostat was turned down from 85 to 70. It was sure a whole heck of a lot more comfortable.

Actually, workers didn’t even know there was a heater problem, just blaming the inside cool on the outside record cold.

When those inside are shivering, what about the poor farmers and ranchers outside all day? Don’t forget the livestock, too.

Long johns, sweaters, insulated coveralls; heavy coats with hoods, extra gloves sometimes with mittens on top became common barnyard attire.

Admittedly, combine operators going fast forward completing soybean harvest shed a layer in the cab. Right back on when the door opens.

Poor critters didn’t realize winter was coming so early with hair coats not grown to extent of official winter weather. They hovered behind the windbreak, low down in the pasture draw and into the timber as possible.

Donations to red kettles help local residents in need

The Salvation Army Red Kettle Campaign, in cooperation with Help House, is starting this weekend in Osage County. Last year through the kettles and mail in donations, a total of $7857.85 was collected.

Eighty-six percent of those dollars stayed in Osage County. Help House is the sole entity to distribute these funds for assistance to Osage County residents in need, such gas vouchers and utility assistance. Those funds were allotted monthly from Salvation Army to Help House, which totaled nearly $1,000 a month through September.

Anyone would like to volunteer to be a bell ringer this season is asked to call Help House at 785-828-4888.

Bell ringers will be found at the three grocery stores in Osage County on the weekends, in addition to counter kettles out in communities in a number of the businesses.

Help House continues to see the need for assistance grow in Osage County. The organization is reaching close to 250 households a month that receive emergency food assistance through the food pantry and from Harvesters.

In the spirit of giving this holiday season, everyone is asked to help as they can. Drop donations in kettles at local businesses or bell ringers, or mail checks made out to Salvation Army to: Help House, PO Box 356, Lyndon KS 66451. 

Hidden History: Young man in early Bleeding Kansas turmoil finds final rest at Quenemo

By Wendi Bevitt

Civil War veteran Charles Howard Dickson is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery outside of Quenemo. If given a chance, no doubt Charles could tell you many different stories of the experiences in his life. However, the one he’d probably tell you first is the exciting tale of his involvement in the rescue of a man and mark the beginning of what was known as the Wakarusa War in Kansas.

Charles’ family moved to Kansas Territory in March 1855 with an immigrant aid company, intent on making Kansas a state free from slavery. The Dicksons settled on a claim in Douglas County, south of Lawrence.

While Charles and his father worked on making the claim ready for their homestead, they stayed in a tent on the claim. Charles’ mother and three siblings resided in Lawrence until the homestead was suitable. Charles’ father would be gone occasionally overnight, leaving the 16-year-old Charles to watch the claim. Threatening storms were the only thing that would make young Charles leave his post, when he would take refuge at the neighboring home of James Abbott and his family.

It was because of this situation that Charles was one of the few people involved in what was known as the “Branson Rescue” from beginning to end. Jacob Branson was a nearby free-state settler. Branson’s friend, Charles Dow, had been shot in mid-November over a land claim by Franklin Coleman, who was a pro-slavery advocate. Coleman fled to Westport, Missouri, seeking to secure an arrest warrant for Jacob Branson. The reason for the warrant was that Branson sought to kill Coleman for murdering his friend. However, it is more likely that the arrest was to silence Branson, the principal witness for the murder of Dow.

Not long after the murder, the local residents attended the Dow murder investigation, James Abbott among the attendees. While the older men were at the investigation, Charles Dickson was a guest at the Abbott home when a knock was heard at the door. A neighbor had arrived, announcing that Sheriff Jones of Westport was on his way with a group of men under cover of darkness to arrest Jacob Branson for the attempted murder of Franklin Coleman.

Mr. Abbott and some of the men who had attended the Dow murder investigation arrived at the Abbott home not long after and rushed to the Branson house to intercept the sheriff and his posse. They were unsuccessful and found themselves instead in hot pursuit with an attempt to rescue their friend.

The free-state group of about 10 or 11 men eventually met up with the posse and demanded that since Jones could not produce the warrant that he claimed to have, the sheriff release their friend. A long period of threats and “impressive language” was exchanged between the two parties, with the free-state group doubling in number by the end. Branson was reluctantly freed, with Sheriff Jones vowing to return to Kansas Territory with a mass of men in retaliation for this act.

KDHE advises food safety for happy holidays

Hotline open for calls of suspected foodborne illnesses

TOPEKA, Kan. – As we enter the busy holiday season, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment is sharing important food safety practices by encouraging Kansans to follow some simple tips to avoid foodborne illnesses.

Clean your hands for 20 seconds with soapy water before touching any food. Wash hands and surfaces often during food preparation. Always serve food on clean plates and avoid reusing plates that previously held raw meat and poultry.

Separate raw and cooked foods to avoid cross contamination. Use a separate cutting board for cooked foods and raw foods and always wash them after use. Do not cut raw vegetables on the same cutting board as raw meat. Wash any utensil after preparing one food item before going on to the next item.

Cook using a food thermometer to make sure all food reaches a safe minimum internal temperature; turkey, stuffing, and casseroles should be 165 degrees F; veal, beef and lamb roasts should reach 145 F; and ham, pork, ground beef and egg dishes should be 160 F. When reheating, leftovers should be thoroughly heated to 165 F.

Chill leftovers within two hours of cooking. Keep track of how long items have been sitting on the table and discard anything that has been out longer than two hours. Keep hot foods hot at 140 F or hotter, and cold foods cold at 40 F or below. Never defrost food at room temperature. Thaw food in the refrigerator, in a cold-water bath or in the microwave.

Report suspected foodborne illnesses to KDHE by calling 877-427-7317. Often, calls from concerned citizens are how outbreaks are first detected.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Speaking softer always better

A Cowboy's Faith: Click to read more from Frank J. Buchman.“Don’t holler.”

That order, actually meant as a special request, takes on special significance for those who have booming-voiced acquaintances.

Fact is some people just naturally come across in a more piercing manner. They really don’t intend to seem bossy, obnoxious or an abusive authority.

Sometimes despite diligent efforts to pipe down, changing the instinctive form of communication is nearly impossible. Oh, if one really concentrates on being softer spoken, there can be noticeable change for a time.

Yet, when pressure comes suddenly, excitement arises, adrenalin flows fast, there’s always that instinctive brash call.

Mom was in personal bias one of the most generous, kind hearted human beings ever created. There wasn’t anything she wouldn’t do for somebody in need or seeking assistance in every special way.

Still, Mom was always somewhat high-pitched in most normal conversation. That itself offended certain ones, while vast numbers of friends and customers appreciated her unique, yet actually quite sweet mannerism.

But, be a grocery employee, especially a carryout boy, not necessarily a son, too, “that scream” sure wasn’t pleasing.

There are many things expected of workers in a small hometown family grocery. Doing everything there is to help all departments, sweep, wash windows, stock shelves, wait on customers, sack and carryout.

While the store was small compared to most of today’s supermarkets, two two-story, buildings were combined for the business. Mom was always at the front greeting, helping customers and tallying the purchases.

When groceries were ready to carry out, assistance was needed right now, not a second later. The deafening shout from the cash register operator was aired.

A Cowboy’s Faith: Fun neighbors on Halloween

“Trick or treat give me something good to eat.”

That’s the threat of ghosts, goblins and every other imaginable getup on Halloween. But it sends them for a whirl with the response: “Sorry no treats it’ll have to be tricks.”

Living in the country, little Halloween visitors are usually few and this year there weren’t any.

The highlight several years though now is when the dairy farm couple from across the section rings the doorbell. It’s usually past bedtime when Keith and Donna come after visiting friends in a 25-mile radius of the farm. All lights were on so they’d know ranchers were waiting.

About 10:20, buzzer sounded, door opened and in came Uncle Sam and his appropriately patriotically attired lady. Big smiles shining through elaborate costume assured it was the dairy farmers who’d hired milkers to get their night off.

Impossible to repeat words of the Uncle Sam song they harmoniously presented. Then the milkmaid asked, “Why did Yankee Doodle Dandy come riding in on a pony?” With no certain answer, just assuming it was sure better than walking.

More than two dozen stops already made, with several more lights awaiting their arrival. Minimal visiting reflected how the elaborate silk red, white and blue outfits came to be.

Donna picked up pieces here, there, yawn, and with scissors, needle, thread expertise put together great semblance to ones pictured. Red stripes on Keith’s white pants were “just painted there.”

Memory’s shy who all they’ve portrayed years gone by: cheerleaders, Roy and Dale, Popeye and Olive, more. A couple other neighbor ladies helped one year for Wizard of Oz. Always with singing accompaniment.

Last year, before dark call informed ice was stopping them, but fortunately back this time.

The jovial neighbors hadn’t made trick or treat warning, but came with their own treats. Costuming, entertaining, visiting were special delight enough, but Donna again handed four big popcorn balls out of her satchel.

That would have been a good day’s work making enough of the evening snacks. Then they had to pack the goodies in the back of their station wagon to be given out.

Oh yes, uptown morning after there were no main street tricks, hay, tires, outhouses like of decades ago.

Reminded of Luke 15:9: “Call together friends and neighbors for a time of rejoicing.”


030615-franksmug2Frank J. Buchman is a lifelong rancher from Alta Vista, a lifetime newspaper writer, syndicated national ag writer and a radio marketing consultant. He writes a weekly column to share A Cowboy’s Faith.


Help House News: Full coat closet warms hearts and people

By Raylene Quaney

The “coat closet” was open from Oct. 1 through Oct. 31 this year with 240 coats being given out. What was left is now out on the floor for those shoppers who are still in need of a nice warm coat for this winter. Adults’ and children’s coats are available while they last. A number of coats were sent to Hope House in Ottawa to be given out there.

Thanksgiving baskets

Those who signed up for a Thanksgiving food baskets are reminded to pick up on their selected day, either Wednesday, Nov. 14, or Thursday, Nov. 15. There were a total of 52 turkeys and 36 chickens available for Thanksgiving baskets. There will not be a giveaway in December as in the past.

Enjoy a soup supper at annual meeting

Nov. 13 at 6 p.m. will be the Help House annual meeting and soup supper, which will be held at the First Baptist Church, Lyndon. If you plan to attend, please call the center and let us know so we have plenty of food available for all. There will be a number of volunteers recognized for their service at that time. We could not open our doors to serve those in need with out you.

It’s good sense to take budget class

The next “Good Sense” budget class will be held 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19. It will be a one-day class. Participants must call to register and stop by and pick up pre-course work. Participants are to bring a snack for lunch if desired and a beverage. The class is free and once completed the participant is eligible to receive assistance with heating or cooling bills. This includes electric, gas, propane or solid fuel (wood). There will not be a class held in December.

Cards of thanks

A number of cards of appreciation go out this month to the following for their contributions to this ministry: EK Realty and e.b. Sprouts, in Lyndon, are collecting food for Thanksgiving baskets; the Lyndon FBLA donated 520 items to the pantry; Overbrook Search Light Club donated 32 cleaning supply items for use at Help House; Overbrook United Methodist Church made a food pantry donation; Overbrook Thimble Club, 43 items for Thanksgiving plus a cash donation; Overbook Fidelis Club, 67 food and non-food items, 12 coats and miscellaneous clothing items.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas