Category Archives: Outdoors

Local artists compete for pizza in Melvern Lake water safety poster contest

Winning posters artists who received their prizes on Aug. 12 were, front from left, Charlie DeMaranville, Faye Carpenter, Zoe Carpenter, Lauryn Raymie; second row, Ethan Kneisler, Allie Kneisler, Emma Bailey, Grace DeMaranville, Rylee Moon; back, Melvern Lake Park Ranger Julie Heslop, Zach Oswald, and Alysa Miller.

Local artistically talented kids will soon be enjoying pizza after demonstrating their knowledge of water safety in the 2017 US Army Corps of Engineers Melvern Lake Water Safety Poster Contest

USACE Park Ranger Julie Heslop organized the water safety poster contest for youth in the Melvern Lake area. There were two age groups, 6-9-year-olds and 10-13-year-olds, and three divisions in each age group. The divisions were Wear Your Life Jacket, Swim With A Buddy, and an Open Division (What Does Water Safety Mean To You?).

Buzzard’s Pizza, Lyndon, donated a large one-topping pizza for the first prize in each division, and Casey’s General Store donated certificates for a large one-topping pizza for the second and third prize for each division. Ribbons in the form of bookmarks, with the Seven Sins of Swimming on one side and contest placement on the other, were given to the top three youth of each division. A brief demonstration on water safety was given before prizes were handed out on Aug. 12, 2017, at the Melvern Lake USACE information center.

There were 38 posters turned in for the contest, and after review by Ranger Julie Heslop and Melvern Lake park attendants the placings were as follows:

Wear Your Life Jacket (ages 6-9): Third place, Rylee Moon; second place, Charlie DeMaranville; first place, Natalee Whitmore.

Swim With A Buddy (ages 6-9): Third place, Zoe Carpenter; second place, Shyanne Allen; first place, Allie Kneisler.

Open division (ages 6-9): Third place, Faye Carpenter; second place, Grace DeMaranville; first place, Lauryn Raymie.

Wear Your Life Jacket (ages 10-13): Third place, Kylie Burkdoll; second place, Sydnie Everhart; first place, Alysa Miller.

Swim With A Buddy (ages 10-13): Third place, Maddie Renfro; second place, Ashton Ehrhardt; first place, Emma Bailey.

Open division (ages 10-13): second place, Zach Oswald; first place, Ethan Kneisler.

Blue-green algae warning continues: Melvern Outlet River Pond, Melvern Outlet Swim Pond

TOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment in conjunction with the Kansas Department of Wildlife Parks and Tourism has issued a public health warning for six lakes, including two ponds at Melvern Lake, and a watch for six lakes due to harmful algal blooms. Overbrook City Lake is one of the lakes that remain under watch for blue-green algae.

If a lake is under a public health warning for blue-green algae, activities such as boating and fishing may be safe. However, direct contact with water (i.e., wading, skiing and swimming) is strongly discouraged for people, pets and livestock. The lakes currently under a watch or warning status are:

  • Warning: Melvern Outlet River Pond, Osage County
  • Warning: Melvern Outlet Swim Pond, Osage County
  • Warning: Central Park Lake, Shawnee County
  • Warning: Marion County Lake, Marion County
  • Warning: Milford Reservoir (Zones B and C), Geary, Dickinson and Clay counties
  • Warning: Webster Lake, Rooks County
  • Watch: Milford Reservoir (Zone A), Geary, Dickinson and Clay counties
  • Watch: Overbrook City Lake, Osage County
  • Watch: Perry Lake (Zone C), Jefferson County
  • Watch: Sam’s Pond, Syracuse, Hamilton County
  • Watch: South Lake, Johnson County
  • Watch: Villa High Lake, Thomas County

Lakes under a warning are not closed. Marinas, lakeside businesses and park camping facilities are open for business. If swim beaches are closed, it will be specifically noted. Drinking water and showers at parks are safe and not affected by algae blooms. Boating and fishing are safe on lakes under a warning, but contact with the water should be avoided. It is safe to eat fish caught during a harmful blue-green algae outbreak, as long as the fish is rinsed with clean water. Only the fillet portion should be consumed, and all other parts should be discarded. Hands should also be washed with clean water after handling fish taken from an affected lake. Zoned lakes may have portions fully open for all recreation even if other portions are under a warning.

‘Go retro’ Saturday at Pomona State Park

Campers enjoy a special kind of relaxation that could only be had yesteryear.

If you’ve ever wondered what it was like in “the old days” to go camping and enjoy time at the lake, this weekend is your chance to experience it. Pomona State Park is “going retro” Saturday Aug. 19, 2017, for the fourth annual Going Retro Car, Vintage Trailer and Antique Boat Show.

From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, vintage camping trailers will be open for touring. Many vintage campers will be new to the show this year. The trailers are original or restored to original, renovated or converted to “glampers”. For the first time, Going Retro will feature antique boats, along with many cars and trucks.

Melvern Lake open for business despite blue-green algae warning at outlet ponds

Melvern Lake’s Coeur d’Alene swim beach awaits beach lovers even though the lake’s outlet ponds are under algae warning.

A blue-green algae warning continues for two popular ponds adjacent to Melvern Lake. A warning covering Melvern Outlet River Pond and Melvern Outlet Swim Pond was issued last week, along with an announcement of the closure of Outlet Swim Beach.

The presence of blue-green algae was confirmed in the ponds, with the warning based on cyanobacteria/toxin results from Aug. 3 and 8, 2017, testing conducted by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

With the swim beach closed, those looking to swim are encouraged to go to Coeur d’Alene swim beach.

The Melvern outlet ponds are among five lakes in the state under warning for blue-green algae, including Central Park Lake, Shawnee County, Marion County Lake, Marion County, and Webster Lake, Rooks County.

Lakes under a warning are not closed. Marinas, lakeside businesses and park camping facilities are open for business. If swim beaches are closed, it will be specifically noted. Drinking water and showers at parks are safe and not affected by algae blooms. Boating and fishing are safe on lakes under a warning, but contact with the water should be avoided. It is safe to eat fish caught during a harmful blue-green algae outbreak, as long as the fish is rinsed with clean water. Only the fillet portion should be consumed, and all other parts should be discarded. Hands should also be washed with clean water after handling fish taken from an affected lake. Zoned lakes may have portions fully open for all recreation even if other portions are under a warning.

Another Osage County lake, Overbrook City Lake, remains under a blue-green algae watch. Also under watches are Milford Reservoir in all zones in Geary, Dickinson and Clay counties; Sam’s Pond, Syracuse, Hamilton County; South Lake, Johnson County and Villa High Lake, Thomas County.

Corps closes swimming beach and issues public health warning for Melvern Lake Outlet Ponds

MELVERN, Kan. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced today the existence of a blue-green algae bloom at the Outlet Campground River Pond and Outlet Swim Beach/Fish Rearing Pond downstream of Melvern Lake, in Osage County, Kan.

These ponds are currently under a warning based on cyanobacteria and toxin results from Aug. 3, 2017, testing conducted by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. As a result, the swim beach at Outlet Swim Beach/Fish Rearing Pond is closed until further notice.  All other facilities in Outlet Park and Melvern Lake remain open.

The present algae bloom is isolated to the Outlet Campground River Pond and Outlet Swim Beach/Fish Rearing Pond below Melvern Lake Dam. Lake visitors can still use the Coeur d’ Alene swim beach on the main lake. Boat ramps and main lake activities are not affected. Marinas, lakeside businesses and park camping facilities are open for business. Drinking water and showers at parks are safe and not affected by algae blooms.

Hot and sunny weather conditions combined with high nutrient levels create ideal conditions for harmful algae bloom growth. Blue-green algae blooms are unpredictable. They can develop rapidly and may float or drift around the lake, requiring visitors to exercise their best judgment. If there is scum, a paint-like surface or the water is bright green, avoid all water contact and keep pets away.

Kansas Forest Service to host emerald ash borer workshops in Topeka

TOPEKA, Kan. – Properly caring for Kansas trees has become an increasingly difficult task for our state’s foresters, city and county staff, tree boards, and other tree care professionals with the invasion of the emerald ash borer in northeast Kansas.

The Kansas Forest Service, Shawnee County Extension, and Shawnee County Parks and Recreation are hosting two free workshops on Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, to address the emerald ash borer. The insect, which has been detected in Shawnee and seven other Kansas counties, is a serious threat bringing larger challenges than ever to the state.

The afternoon seminar will be 1-4:30 p.m. in the Preston Hale Room of the Ward Meade Historic Site, in Topeka. It will focus on the identification of the pest, details of the quarantine in place, and the impact to community forests and governmental budgets. An open forum for participant networking will follow the program.

The general public is encouraged to attend the evening session at 6:30 p.m. at the Shawnee County K-State Research and Extension office to learn about the emerald ash borer, how to identify the insect, detect signs of damage, and management options. Homeowners, landowners, and concerned citizens are invited to attend this informational event.

Master Gardener program now taking applications; classes to be held in Lawrence

The Frontier Extension District is currently taking applications for Master Gardner training this fall. If you aren’t sure if the Master Gardener program is for you, ask yourself these questions.

Do you enjoy working in the garden, flower bed or your lawn? Do you enjoy people, learning new things, and helping out in your community? If you answered yes to these questions, the Master Gardner program may be for you.

In the Master Gardner program you will learn about plant biology, soils, flowers, trees and shrubs. You’ll even learn about lawn care, fruits, vegetables, indoor plants, insects, diseases and pesticides. The educational information you will receive can benefit you and your neighborhood.

This year Master Gardner training will be 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays, from Aug. 22 through Oct. 24. In addition, there will be two Saturday classes, Sept. 16 and Oct. 14. All training will take place at the Douglas County Extension Office, 2110 Harper St., Lawrence, Kan.

Forgotten bridge spans the flow of time

By Paul Schmidt

The remains of an abandoned Pratt through-truss, five-panel, pin-connected bridge still spans the Dragoon Creek near Burlingame, Kan. Built in 1899 by the Kansas City Bridge Company, only its strong frame survives. It is one of many old surviving bridges that add character and intrigue to Osage County. Details of this bridge were provided by Bridgehunter.com – a site devoted to documenting historic and notable bridges of the U.S. 

To enjoy the outdoors, Agnes goes camping

Buckled in for a tour in a UTV, Agnes Green in the back seat with her nephew David Jones and Edith Chambers in the front, hold on as driver and ranger Rob Dunham prepares to take off.

POMONA STATE PARK – What do you do if you’re 91 years old and you suddenly get the urge to go camping? Well, if you’re Agnes Green, and a resident at Life Care Center of Osawatomie, you and a few friends pack up a bus and head to the lake!

That’s what happened Wednesday at Pomona State Park, when two buses of nursing home residents arrived to spend the night in cabins at the park and have a camping experience they wouldn’t soon forget.

Somewhat on the spur of the moment, the trip came together after Life Care activities director Tammy Conner was sitting with Agnes outside the center one evening.

“Agnes said she loved sitting outdoors and could sit out there all night,” Conner said. The two talked about being outdoors and Agnes said she would like to go camping again someday.

Conner, who is constantly seeking fun things to do for residents of the center, started thinking about how a camping trip for Agnes and some of the residents could happen. After an internet search, she came across information about Pomona State Park’s handicap accessible cabins. Noting the park was within easy driving distance of Osawatomie, she thought it could provide a great camping experience for the residents, even those with limited mobility.

Conner contacted the park about making reservations, and after talking with park staff, the plan really started to come together.

According to Debbie Rinzler, administrative specialist at the park, she and other park staff and members of the Friends of Pomona State Park began working to make it an unforgettable camping experience.

“We wanted to make it as fun for them as possible,” Rinzler said.

Several local businesses were contacted about providing some special treats, and as it turned out the campers had a late night pizza party by the campfire, courtesy of Green Acres Pizza & Sub, and warm cinnamon rolls for breakfast Thursday morning baked up fresh by Lamont Hill Restaurant.

Dragoon forever marches across the Osage County prairie

By Paul Schmidt

The 205,359-acre Dragoon Creek watershed is part of the Pomona Lake watershed in east-central Kansas. Dragoon Creek originates in the southeast portion of Wabaunsee County, and it flows southeast until it merges with 110-Mile, Plummer and Valley Brook creeks to form Lake Pomona. Dragoon Creek is named after Pvt. Samuel Hunt, who was part of a Dragoon military expedition to Colorado and died Sept. 11, 1835. The 23-year-old soldier is buried west of Burlingame near the creek that now bears his name. This photo is of the final stretch of the Dragoon very close to Lake Pomona, taken through a concrete rail arch of the abandoned U.S. Highway 75 bridge (No. 75-70 16.8, constructed 1954).

Be safe over Fourth of July holiday weekend

There is family fun to be had on the water, but be safe.

KANSAS CITY, Mo.- As one of the nation’s largest federal provider of water-based recreation, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Kansas City District stresses water safety and urges extra caution while in or around water during the upcoming Independence Day holiday.

Many people enjoy water-based recreation as part of their Fourth of July celebration. Outdoors enthusiasts can enjoy scenic river and lake views while taking advantage of picnicking, camping, fishing, boating and swimming opportunities.

Unfortunately, some celebrations end tragically due to accidents in, on and around the water. To ensure a safer recreation experience over the holiday and throughout the year, the Corps urges visitors to practice the following water safety tips:

Rains pester area farmers trying to bring in the sheaves

Two prodigious and plentiful products of Kansas: wheat and beautiful sunsets. This close-up photo of heads of wheat ready for harvest in Osage County was taken by Paul Schmidt right before the 2016 harvest. Between rains over the last week, area farmers have begun cutting while hoping for a few dry days to finish it off.

Photo by Paul Schmidt.

Lyndon Methodists ‘rev up’ for sixth annual engine-powered show

Old met older as vintage vehicles parked all around the historic Bailey House at Lyndon City Park last Saturday.

By Rebecca Thill

Despite the extreme weather and power outages early Saturday morning, the sixth annual “Get Rev’d Up” Car Show at Lyndon went on without a hitch.

There were close to 100 entries, including cars, motorcycles, steam engines, and 18-wheelers. Twenty awards were given out along with several specialty awards and several memorial awards.

Live music was provided by Mike Cline and the Constance Praise Band, and a DJ. There were also activities, with goody bags provided for all the children that attended. Face painting, tattoos, and Hot Wheels racing were a hit with all the kids.

The church’s preschool served biscuits with sausage gravy and breakfast burritos, the Mothers of Preschoolers had homemade cinnamon rolls for sale, and lunch was served by the United Methodist Church finance team. The United Methodist Women had a variety of 13 flavors of homemade ice cream.

Proceeds from the event support Youth Ministries, MOPS, Lyndon United Methodist Preschool, and the Lyndon United Methodist Women.

Here’s some views of the park jammed with motorized vehicles.

Five Kansas lakes under public health warning due to blue-green algae

TOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment, in conjunction with the Kansas Department of Wildlife Parks and Tourism, has issued a public health warning for five lakes due to a harmful algal bloom.

If a lake is under a public health warning for blue-green algae, activities such as boating and fishing may be safe. However, direct contact with water, such as wading, skiing and swimming, is strongly discouraged for people, pets and livestock. The lakes currently under a watch or warning status are:

  • Warning: Keith Sebelius Reservoir, Norton County
  • Warning: Kirwin Lake, Phillips County
  • Warning: Marion County Lake, Marion County
  • Warning: Marion Reservoir, Marion County
  • Warning: Sam’s Pond, Syracuse, Hamilton County
  • Watch: Webster Lake, Rooks County

Lakes under a warning are not closed. Marinas, lakeside businesses and park camping facilities are open for business. If swim beaches are closed, it will be specifically noted. Drinking water and showers at parks are safe and not affected by algae blooms. Boating and fishing are safe on lakes under a warning, but contact with the water should be avoided. It is safe to eat fish caught during a harmful blue-green algae outbreak, as long as the fish is rinsed with clean water. Only the fillet portion should be consumed, and all other parts should be discarded. Hands should also be washed with clean water after handling fish taken from an affected lake. Zoned lakes may have portions fully open for all recreation even if other portions are under a warning.

Osage County State Fishing Lake among available bathymetric maps for anglers

PRATT – What’s a bathymetric map, you ask? Bathymetry is the study of underwater depth of lake or ocean floors. So, it’s really a topographical map of the lake’s floor, and those maps have traditionally only been available for our larger reservoirs. However, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism fisheries biologists have been working on a project for the past year to build bathymetric maps of many of our smaller lakes. Anglers can use these maps to help locate fishing hotspots.

Lucky for Osage County State Fishing Lake fishermen, a map is now available of that lake, too.

Biologists created bathymetric maps of these smaller lakes for two reasons: they help biologists manage fisheries more efficiently and they help anglers find more fish. These new maps will help anglers identify creek channels, depth changes, and in some cases, habitat cubes placed in the last few years. In other words, a little bit of studying can help anglers navigate new water quickly and efficiently. And maps that show depth and contours of the lake floors can help anglers locate spots that hold fish or are fish highways.

To be successful, anglers rely on using an assortment of tools, including specialized rods and reels, different colors and sizes of lures, the newest electronics, and cell phone apps that give up-to-the-minute weather reports.

A printable version of the Osage County State Fishing Lake map can be downloaded or viewed here, or see the 46 bathymetric maps available for small impoundments across Kansas here: ksoutdoors.com/Fishing/Where-to-Fish-in-Kansas/Bathymetric-Lake-Maps

Emerald ash borer confirmed in Shawnee County

MANHATTAN, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Agriculture, along with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, has confirmed the presence of emerald ash borer in Shawnee County, Kan.

On June 6, 2017, several emerald ash borer galleries were observed and a live emerald ash borer adult was removed while peeling bark from a tree, after KDA was notified by an arborist. The suspect tree was identified while the arborist was trimming branches for a homeowner in a residential area near Lake Shawnee. KDA sent the specimen to a laboratory with USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Plant Protection and Quarantine (USDA-APHIS-PPQ) which confirmed KDA’s findings on June 7, 2017.

Emerald ash borer, a pest of ash trees native to Asia, was first discovered in North America near Detroit, Mich., in summer 2002. Since that time, the pest has killed millions of ash trees across the U.S. It was first identified in Kansas in 2012, and has been identified in several counties in northeast Kansas in the last five years. Trees become infested with emerald ash borer when adult beetles lay eggs on the bark, which hatch into larvae that bore tunnels into the tree. emerald ash borer appears to prefer trees under stress, but is capable of killing perfectly healthy trees.

KDA encourages anyone in northeast Kansas to monitor their ash trees for signs of emerald ash borer, and to be vigilant in not transporting any wood or tree materials from ash trees out of your county, including firewood, nursery stock, green lumber, and composted or non-composted chips.

West Nile virus arrives early in Kansas

TOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has discovered that four Culex species mosquito pools collected from traps in Reno, Shawnee and Johnson counties are positive for West Nile virus in preliminary testing, and that two birds in Shawnee County have tested positive for West Nile virus. In addition, Kansas is reporting the first case of West Nile virus in 2017 in a person from Barton County. These findings may indicate that West Nile virus transmission could occur much earlier in 2017 than in previous years.

The Culex species are known to transmit West Nile virus, but are not known to transmit Zika virus.

West Nile virus can be spread to people through bites from infected mosquitoes, but it is not contagious from person to person. Symptoms range from a slight headache and low-grade fever to swelling of the brain or brain tissue and in rare cases, death. People who have had West Nile virus before are considered immune.

KDHE has developed West Nile virus risk levels to help guide prevention efforts for both communities and individuals. These risk level reports will be posted weekly at www.kdheks.gov/epi/arboviral_disease.htm. All three regions of Kansas are currently at the high risk level.

KDHE recommends the following precautions to protect against West Nile Virus:

Rustic riot? Pasture pandemonium? Field frenzy? Nope, it’s Cross Country Chaos!

Has springtime seemed a little busy this year? Well, tighten up your suspenders and pull on your muck boots, because it’s about to get plumb chaotic in Osage County on Saturday.

That’s right, total chaos is about to break out again in the countryside southwest of Osage City, Kan., on Saturday, June 10, 2017, as racers, runners, and mud lovers set out on 5k trek through a Kansas pasture to challenge their willpower, drive and physical fitness – and have the time of their lives.

Race time kicks off sometime after registration at 8 a.m., when the pasture trail becomes filled with waves of wet, muddy people climbing walls, scrambling over hay havoc, wallowing in mud mayhem, swimming in lily pads, beam balancing, knotted in a cargo net, and sliding down slimy creek banks. It’s a race if you want it to be, but for most participants it’s an obstacle course of fun and mud that can’t be found in a city.

chaos_250x180_2017In its fifth year, Cross Country Chaos ensues on about a quarter section on the Perry Thompson farm. Thompson, president of the Osage County Community Foundation, said the idea for an obstacle race came together as the foundation searched for funding methods.  Obstacle course races have become popular among those who appreciate these types of disorganized sports, also known as mud runs.

Past races have raised funds for the community foundation in addition to raising awareness of the foundation, which serves the countywide community with a mission to “provide a method of giving that represents the ideas and the interest of people who want to increase the impact of their philanthropy.”

Thompson said all skill levels are invited to compete. Although a timed event, he said the race is about accomplishments and also giving to local charities, the mission of the Osage County Community Foundation. He invites local businesses or clubs to enter as teams in the competition.

Kids, wake up bright and early Saturday, it’s time to go fishing

Two fishermen discuss the best bait to use at the 2015 kids fishing competition at Pomona State Park.

It’s going to be an excellent time for fishing in Osage County this weekend, with free fishing statewide, and Pomona State Park’s annual kids fishing derby on Saturday.

Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism observes National Fishing and Boating Week, June 3-11, 2017, by letting Kansas anglers fish for free on June 3 and 4. That means that anyone may fish in Kansas without a fishing license.

To participate in the Pomona State Park kids fishing derby, registration begins at 8 a.m. Saturday, with first lines going in at 8:30 a.m. The Friends of Pomona State Park have also planned a kids’ carnival that will begin at 10 a.m. The event will be at Boat Ramp No. 2.

Kansas lakes and rivers are known for producing big crappie, abundant channel catfish, huge flathead catfish and giant blue catfish. However, thousands of farm ponds that dot the rural landscape are filled with largemouth bass, bluegill, crappie and catfish. Federal reservoirs are known for producing great walleye, wiper, crappie and white bass fishing.

For more information, contact Pomona State Park at 785-828-4933.

Wildlife officers pull stolen vehicle from Osage State Fishing Lake, discover zebra mussels

When state wildlife officials pulled a decades-old stolen vehicle out of Osage County State Fishing Lake last Thursday, they also made a grim discovery: Zebra mussels.

“We got it out of the water, pulled it onto the shore, and saw obvious zebra mussels on it,” said Captain Dan Melson, of Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism law enforcement division, Friday. “It didn’t take long to confirm them.”

With the four mussels found on a late ‘80s Honda Civic that had been reported stolen more than 25 years ago, the discovery confirmed the infestation of the third major lake in Osage County with the invasive nuisance species.

According to Melson, Osage County game warden Lynn Koch discovered the vehicle submerged with its roof about five feet under the water surface last Sunday, April 23, while running sonar in the locally popular fishing lake.

“We have sonar in most of the boats,” Melson said. “We’ve asked game wardens to check locations where cars could be dumped in lakes.”

Melson said Koch located the vehicle on the east side of the lake, off the end of a fishing pier in an area that had been closed off to vehicle traffic about three years ago. He said the vehicle was reported stolen in the early 1990s from Topeka, and it had an expiration date of 1991 on its license tag decal. The windows were all intact and vehicle had little damage except for some items removed, the captain said.

Besides collecting a few zebra mussels and serving as fish habitat, the vehicle had apparently also been a nuisance to many fishermen over the years.

“It had plenty of hooks and sinkers on it,” Melson said.

Discovery of the vehicle left investigators with a cold 25-year-old car theft case with low priority for solving, but Melson said similar efforts in the past have solved missing persons cases.

“We had repeated this same sonar work six summers ago and discovered six vehicles – two had missing persons in them,” he said.

Friday, KDWPT released confirmation of the presence of zebra mussels in Osage State Fishing Lake. KDWPT reported the officers who discovered adult zebra mussels attached to the vehicle reported the find to KDWPT fisheries staff, who verified the discovery.

Corps to begin charging camping fee at Sun Dance Campground in May

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will begin charging a camping fee of $10 per night at Sun Dance Campground at Melvern Lake at the beginning of the 2017 recreation season. The campground had been the only free campground at Melvern Lake.

The fee will apply May 1 through Sept. 30, and is payable at the self-pay station at the entrance of the campground. Camping fees can be paid by check or cash. Campers are allowed to camp at the same location up to 14 consecutive days, after which campers must vacate the campground for a minimum of 24 hours prior to returning. The Corps reminded visitors that while the fee does not pertain to the winter months of Oct. 1-April 30, the camping time limit remains the same.

To avoid overcrowding sites, a maximum of two camping units is allowed per campsite (two tents, or one tent and one RV), and a maximum of two vehicles are allowed per campsite.

For more information, visit the Melvern Lake information center at the south end of Melvern Dam, or call 785-549-3318.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas