Category Archives: Health

Eat Well to Be Well: Set goals to stay healthy during the holidays

Good health starts with good health habits

I think we can all agree on one thing – holidays can be stressful! There’s shopping, cooking, entertaining family, and now, the unusual event of a viral pandemic showing few signs of slowing down. Yes, this holiday season, stress overload is at an all time high.

Despite not being able to completely control our current pandemic situation, focus instead on having a well-thought out plan of successfully managing what we can be in charge of – our health! By having plan and setting in motion strategies supporting our health and well-being, we can flourish and thrive like never before while feeling our best, even during uncertain times.  Here’s how:

1. Keep moving: Fitting in time for fitness during holidays can be challenging. But with some creativity and determination, it can be done. Start by avoiding long stretches of sitting. Make a goal to be up and moving for even just five minutes every 30 to 60 minutes throughout the day. Walk 10 minutes or more after a meal, play catch or Frisbee with your kids (or adults too!), put on music and dance, rake leaves, pace around the house, perform simple squats or lunge exercises, or walk around while talking on your cell phone. Activity helps reduce lower blood glucose levels, improves heart health and increases energy by getting muscles activated.

Goal: Work toward 30-60 minutes of activity a day.

Commissioners exempt Osage County from governor’s statewide mask mandate

County health department reports 120 active cases

LYNDON, Kan. – In a social media post this afternoon, the Osage County Health Department announced that Osage County commissioners had exempted the county from Gov. Laura Kelly’s statewide emergency order issued last week requiring Kansans to wear face masks in most public situations. Kelly had issued the order due to the rising number of COVID-19 cases statewide, saying Kansas is facing a crisis with recent “worrying” spikes in cases, hospitalizations, and deaths, and stretching the healthcare system’s ability to handle the influx of patients.

Kelly’s order noted that “wearing a face covering in public is the easiest and most effective way to protect each other, ease the burden on our overburdened healthcare system, and help keep our businesses open and our economy running …”

Kelly’s order gave county commissioners until this week to decide to comply with the order, adopt their own order, or exempt the county from the order.

In a resolution approved at today’s meeting of the Osage County Commission, and posted on Osage County’s website, county commissioners ordered Osage County exempt from the governor’s order, citing three reasons:

“Enforcement of the governor’s executive order mandating masks would be difficult, if not impossible and would be an unreasonable strain on county resources such as PPE and local law enforcement.

“Broad ranging recommendations on safety precautions to fight the potential spread of COVID-19 better serve the public’s overall interests than governmental mandates.

“Opting out of the governor’s statewide executive order gives Osage County flexibility going forward to make recommendations or mandates, if necessary, that best protect the health and safety of Osage County, Kansas.”

While opting out of the governor’s mask order, the commissioners adopted a mask protocol for the county, signed by Osage County Health Director Jackie Patterson, and Fred Diver, commissioner and county board of health chairman.

The county’s mask protocol does not mandate the use of masks, “but recognizes the significance of utilizing them in order to mitigate the transmission of COVID-19 in the population. Therefore, masks are not mandated, but are strongly recommended in Osage County whenever in any public space indoors, or outside when at least six feet social distancing cannot be maintained.”

The Osage County Board of Health’s protocol also echoes the commissioners’ reluctance to enforce a mask mandate. “While we recognize the significance of face coverings in mitigating the transmission of COVID-19, we find a mandate inherently unenforceable at the county level,” the health board protocol says.

Eat Well to Be Well: The harmful health reality of excess belly fat

If zipping up your favorite jeans or buttoning a shirt over your belly has become problematic, it’s time to face reality – you’re likely carrying excess belly fat. Whether you’re a man or woman, carrying an excess band of fat around your abdominal or midsection is risky to your health.

Accumulating belly fat can sneak up on a person. Contributing factors leading to gaining belly fat include consuming too many calories and not enough exercise, lack of sleep, and getting older, as aging can cause loss of muscle mass and a decreased metabolism, and your genetics, which can determine where you tend to store body fat.

The dangers of deep belly fat

Unlike fat found on the hips and thighs, fat around the middle (belly fat) produces biologically active substances creating an environment conducive to serious health risks. Because of its proximity to the major organs in your midsection, think of belly fat sort of like an apron hanging from your large intestine surrounding your internal organs. When fat collects deep within the central abdominal area of the body known as visceral fat, it poses greater risks of major chronic diseases than excess fat lying just beneath the skin, subcutaneous fat, found on hips, thighs, and buttocks. One danger is that fat cells of visceral fat are its own endocrine organ, secreting hormones, proteins, and other molecules having far-reaching negative effects on other tissue and organs nearby.

For instance, visceral fat releases more fatty acids into the blood than other types of fat tissue, contributing to a blood lipid profile associated with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a combination of visceral fat, high blood glucose (insulin resistance), high blood pressure, and altered blood lipids greatly increasing risk of heart disease leading to a heart attack or stroke.

Visceral fat also makes proteins called cytokines, which can trigger low-level inflammation, another predictor of heart disease. This also acts as a precursor to angiotensin, a protein that causes blood vessels to constrict, increasing blood pressure.

In addition, these same visceral fat cells lead to a loss of sensitivity to insulin, a hormone crucial for burning energy and keeping blood sugar in control. As a result, extra belly fat increases the risk of insulin resistance, bringing its own potential complications. Insulin resistance often leads to type 2 diabetes, which affects more than 34 million Americans and is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S.

Safe housing options available for those impacted by COVID-19

To help Kansans protect their families and household members, the state is working to provide safe housing options for those affected by COVID-19. Non-congregate sheltering is an option for individuals in multiple communities in the state. Sheltering is available for those who cannot safely isolate or quarantine in their homes and have tested positive for COVID-19, those who have been exposed to someone who has tested positive, and those living and working in at-risk or congregate settings.

“The most effective way to slow the spread of the virus is to isolate or quarantine yourself away from others in your household,” said Devan Tucking, human services branch director, Kansas Division of Emergency Management. “These non-congregate shelter options are being provided because we know it is not always possible to isolate or quarantine someone in a single-family residence where people must share a kitchen, a bathroom, laundry room and other spaces.”

Non-congregate shelters are provided in coordination with the Kansas Department of Children and Families, Kansas Division of Emergency Management and local emergency management and public health departments.

At this time shelters are located in the following locations:

  • Ford County, Dodge City
  • Johnson County, Gardner
  • Leavenworth County, Lansing
  • Lyon County, Emporia
  • Saline County, Saline
  • Seward County, Liberal
  • Wyandotte County, Kansas City

The shelter provides free housing, three meals a day and snacks, laundry service, and a cleaning service to provide a safe shelter to avoid exposing households to the COVID-19 virus and help stop the spread of the virus.

COVID-19 infects more than 100 in Osage County in one week

Around 100 new cases of COVID-19 have been diagnosed in Osage County in the last week, as Kansas reports record numbers of confirmed cases daily across the state.

As reported by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment today, Nov. 13, 2020, Osage County now has had 306 confirmed cases since the pandemic began. The Osage County Health Department confirmed that five people in Osage County have died from the virus as of Nov. 5, and that day marked 182 cases tallied in the county, including 25 active positive cases and 157 recovered cases. KDHE reported Osage County’s total cases at 206 on Nov. 5, with 100 new cases diagnosed in the last week.

OCHD reported Nov. 10 that the department would not be issuing case counts for the county this week due to being “very busy and short staffed,” while KDHE reported 25 new cases that day – the highest number of diagnosed cases in one day for the county since the pandemic began in March. Last month, the most new cases recorded in a day were six on Oct. 17; the record was broken on Nov. 3 with seven cases recorded; then Nov. 5, 10 cases; Nov. 10, 25 cases; Nov. 11, 16 cases; and yesterday recorded a dozen more.

Osage County is under no health orders regarding COVID-19, as the Osage County commissioners took action in July to reject Gov. Laura Kelly’s plan to mandate mask wearing in public spaces statewide and other measures. The Osage County Board of Health’s reasoning for rejecting the governor’s mandates was the few COVID-19 cases in Osage County at the time and little evidence of community spread of the disease, and that enforcement of the mandate would be difficult.

According to state data, Osage County’s coronavirus infection rate remains lower than the state average, with Osage County at 19.19 cases per thousand people, and the state at 39.65 cases per thousand.

When the pandemic began, county officials implemented temperature screening of visitors and employees at the Osage County Courthouse, but that precaution was later abandoned. Several schools or activities have been shut down for extended periods for quarantine purposes since the school year began. In July, the Osage County Senior Center was closed due to being a possible cluster site, but it has since reopened. No clusters have been publicly reported in Osage County. In October, the Osage County Jail reported that a person in custody had tested positive for the virus, but no other jail residents or staff were reported as infected.

Oct. 13, the health department reported the first death in the county from the virus; the person had died in September. Since then four more Osage County deaths have been attributed to COVID-19. One month ago, OCHD reported there had been a total of 124 positive cases recorded in the county since the pandemic began. As of Nov. 5 in Osage County, 2,633 negative tests results had been recorded.

Osage County relaxes quarantine rules for mask wearers

The rate of COVID-19 infection in Osage County has increased to about two per day during the month of October, and as of today, Oct. 23, 2020, Kansas Department of Health and Environment confirmed that one percent of Osage County’s population has been infected by the disease since March. In its Friday report, KDHE showed Osage County has had 160 confirmed infections since the pandemic began.

While Kansas continues to be designated as a red zone by the White House Coronavirus Task Force, which means 100 new cases per 100,000 people per week, Osage County has taken steps to relax its quarantine rules regarding the use of masks.

In July, the Osage County Commission chose to exempt the county from Gov. Laura Kelly’s mask order and other measures, and instead has been managing the emergency locally under guidelines of the local board of health.

Earlier this week, the Osage County Health Department issued new guidelines for the county regulating when quarantine is ordered for people in contact with someone who has been confirmed as COVID-19 infected. In a public notice, the department said people in Osage County who are determined to be in close contact of a person who has a confirmed positive test for COVID-19 may be exempted from quarantine if the positive individual and the close contact were wearing masks at the time of the exposure.

The notice said data collected in Osage County by the health department has noted that no individuals who have been quarantined due to close contact with a confirmed positive case have tested positive for COVID-19, with the exception of household contacts.

The notice outlined the effect of quarantine on people’s lives: “Quarantines greatly affect the livelihood, mental health, and well-being of our citizens. In particular, our youth and families have been adversely affected by quarantines that have forced some schools to close, parents to stay home from work, and important social and sporting events to be cancelled. Without data that supports the need for these quarantines, it is in the best interest of our citizens to review our process.

“When both parties wear a properly fitting mask that has at least two layers (as in school settings currently), data shows that the risk for a close contact to contract COVID-19 is minimal. Osage County is not implementing a mask mandate, but rather asking that when citizens are out in public, especially at any event in which there are many people (such as school, sports activities, riding public transit, or attending social events), that they wear a mask to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. This is mainly aimed at schools, where students and staff already wear masks and where quarantines have already caused significant disruption to important life activities. However, this will also benefit anyone else attending any public gathering, attending work, or other social events Osage County.”

The notice said there might still be a need to quarantine an individual due to high risk circumstances even when both parties were wearing a mask.

As of today, KDHE reports that Osage County has had 160 confirmed COVID-19 cases since March 23. OCHD reports there are currently 18 people in the county with active infections, with one of those in the hospital, and 62 people quarantined as of Thursday. Two people from Osage County have been reported as dying from the disease. KDHE reports that 2,543 negative test results have been recorded in the county.

On Sept. 30, KDHE reported Osage County had tallied 114 cases. From July through September, the county added about one new case a day. But from Oct. 1 to today’s total of 160, cases increased at a rate of two per day. Osage County’s population is 15,949.

Statewide there have been 76,230 positive cases, 975 people have died, and 3,584 people have been hospitalized due to the virus.

Junior high Lady Trojans, Lady Indians ‘Pink Out’ for breast cancer awareness

MdCV JH volleyball team sports their “Pink Out” shirts and masks, donated to the team by TiFi Totty, a mom and breast cancer survivor; front from left, Mady Rose, Emily Criqui (manager) and Braelyn McNally; middle, Eden Hockett, Lexi Totty, Kadence Masenthin, Catayah Thompson, Cobie Cormode, Grace Spillman, Akyra Traver, Trista DeCavele, and Ella Reed; back, Allison Reeser, Destiny Moore, and Clare Hockett. Lisa Reeser photo.

During an inspirational night shared by all in attendance, Oct. 6, 2020, the Marais des Cygnes Valley Junior High Lady Trojans volleyball team competed at home against the Lyndon Junior High Lady Tigers.

Though the night would appear to be a night of school rivals, in actuality it was a night of two teams competing with one goal. Both the Lady Trojans and Tigers, along with their towns’ crowds, sported pink attire. At intermission between games, the teams lined up to share inspirational quotes and announce totals of funds they collected for their charities while bringing awareness to breast cancer.

Boil water advisory rescinded for Carbondale water users

Update, Oct. 22, 2020: The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has rescinded a boil water advisory for the city of Carbondale, Osage County, Kan. The advisory was issued because of a loss of pressure in the system. Failure to maintain adequate pressure can lead to a loss of chlorine residuals and bacterial contamination. Laboratory testing samples collected from the City of Carbondale indicate no evidence of bacteriological contamination and all other conditions that placed the system at risk of contamination are deemed by KDHE officials to be resolved.

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TOPEKA, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has issued a boil water advisory for the city of Carbondale, located in Osage County, Kan. This advisory is not related to COVID-19. KDHE issued the advisory because of a loss of pressure in the system. Failure to maintain adequate pressure can lead to a loss of chlorine residuals and bacterial contamination.

Water users on the Carbondale water system should observe the following precautions until further notice:

  • If tap water appears dirty, flush the water lines by letting the water run until it clears.
  • Boil water for one minute prior to drinking or food preparation, or use bottled water.
  • Dispose of ice cubes and do not use ice from a household automatic ice maker.
  • Disinfect dishes and other food contact surfaces by immersion for at least one minute in clean tap water that contains one teaspoon of unscented household bleach per gallon of water.
  • Water used for bathing does not generally need to be boiled. Supervision of children is necessary while bathing to ensure water is not ingested. Persons with cuts or severe rashes may wish to consult their physicians.

The boil water advisory took effect on Oct. 20, 2020, and will remain in effect until the conditions that placed the system at risk of bacterial contamination are resolved. KDHE will issue a rescind order following testing at a certified laboratory.

COVID-19 takes life of Osage County resident

In its latest COVID-19 update, the Osage County Health Department has reported one death in the county has been attributed to the virus.

In a social media post Oct. 13, 2020, the health department said, “There has been a death attributed in part to COVID-19 in a patient from Osage County. This patient passed away last month, and our health department was just notified of the ruling. We are not able to release any other info at this time. Thank you for understanding.”

In today’s COVID-19 update, the department reported that Osage County currently has 11 active cases of the virus, 61 people quarantined, one patient hospitalized, and 113 recovered cases. The department reported that since testing began, the county has tallied 2,248 negative test results.

County officials confirm COVID-19 case at the Osage County Jail

The Osage County Sheriff’s Office reported this afternoon in a social media post there has been one confirmed case of COVID-19 in a resident of the Osage County Jail.

The post said testing for all residents and staff is scheduled to begin tomorrow, Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2020.

The Osage County Jail has been in consultation with officials from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment on next steps to address these circumstances. As a result of the consultation with KDHE, the following steps were implemented:

  • The patient with the confirmed case was previously quarantined and will remain quarantined for the next 14 days and will be tested weekly.
  • KDHE will test staff and inmates weekly.
  • Osage County will remain diligent in monitoring other staff and residents for symptoms.

The Osage County Sheriff’s Office reported it is working closely with KDHE, Osage County Health Department, and Osage County Emergency Management to make sure Osage County Jail facility remains safe for its employees and residents.

Eat Well to Be Well: Fill your plate with fall produce to enhance heart health

As temperatures drop and winds pick up, heading into fall is a sure sign change is on its way. One healthy change you’ll see in your grocery store is the switch from summer produce to fall fruits, vegetables, and nuts packed with important heart healthy nutrients.

Heart disease is the number one ranked cause of death in the United States, with more than 30 million adults diagnosed with this chronic condition. The umbrella term heart disease, often used interchangeably with the term cardiovascular disease, includes a range of conditions affecting your heart. These conditions include hypertension, arrhythmias, coronary artery disease, and heart defects you’re born with among others. Heart disease results in developing narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can lead to heart attack, chest pain (agina) or stroke.

One of the most effective ways to help prevent and combat this leading cause of death is to choose foods supporting heart health. Fruits and vegetables, along with other healthy plant-based foods, lead the way as some of the most nutrient-packed foods to bring home from the grocery store.

Research supports this – a July 2020 study in JAMA Internal Medicine analyzing more than 415,000 people found those who consumed a high-protein diet relying heavily on plant-based protein sources could reduce their risk for death from heart disease by at least 10 percent. Modifying the choices you make for protein appears to influence your risk of heart disease. That’s because foods such as vegetables, beans, peas, nuts, and seeds, not only are a source of plant-based protein, they also have nutrients such as phytochemicals that have anti-inflammatory and cholesterol-lowering properties.

To make the best heart healthy choices for this season, here are fall foods to consider:

West Nile virus confirmed in horse in Douglas County

MANHATTAN, Kan. – The Kansas Department of Agriculture Division of Animal Health has received notification of a confirmed case of West Nile virus in a horse in Douglas County, Kansas.

WNV is a preventable disease, with annual vaccinations that have proven highly effective. The infected animal was not current with its vaccinations, but is responding favorably to treatment. All horse owners should consult with their local veterinarians and make a vaccination plan for their horses.

WNV is a virus that can infect humans, horses, birds and other species. Horses infected with WNV can have symptoms that range from depression, loss of appetite and fever to severe neurologic signs such as incoordination, weakness, inability to rise, and hypersensitivity to touch or sound. WNV can be fatal in horses. If you see symptoms of WNV in your horse, contact your veterinarian immediately.

Celebrate your family during Family Day

There is at least one thing that all parents can do to help their kids grow up healthy: get involved. Research shows that teens are less likely to drink, smoke or use drugs when they feel that their parents are actively involved in their lives. On the last Monday in September, Drug Free Osage County is inviting everyone to celebrate Family Day. Family Day was founded by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, to celebrate the positive influences that parents have on their kids.

Finding time to connect isn’t always easy. But, the simple, little things you do with your kids each day make a difference. Although our world is a little different right now, these activities still create strong, healthy relationships that can have a big impact on things like preventing future drug use. Supportive relationships with children are also linked to strong social skills, better judgment, self-confidence, improved school performance, increased self-control, and resilience.

Research done by The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse has consistently found a relationship between children having frequent dinners with their parents and a decreased risk of their smoking, drinking or using other drugs. It is important for kids to know that there is someone who will listen and help them make good choices. It is also important to start early. If kids aren’t used to talking to you about their day when they are 8 or 10, it is harder to start at 12 or 14.

In addition to sharing a meal, play a game, go for a walk, work on a project, or even run an errand together. Ask your kids about their day, share a story, have a conversation. For tips, activities and ideas, visit www.casafamilyday.org. Make every day Family Day.

Health department reminds everyone to get flu shot

The Osage County Health Department is encouraging everyone to remember to get their flu shot this year. The department currently has high-dose vaccine in stock, which is for people age 65 and older. The rest of the department’s regular stock inventory is expected to be in soon, but the state has been behind in receiving its supply of state-funded vaccine (VFC program vaccine), and it may be longer before inventory is received for KanCare (Medicaid) card holders. Call the health department at 785-828-3117 before visiting to check on flu vaccine availability. The department accepts Medicare and Blue Cross Blue Shield insurances.

Osage County Health Department is at 103 E. Ninth St., Lyndon, Kan.

VA offers free drive-through flu shots for enrolled veterans

TOPEKA, Kan.-Beginning Sept. 21, 2020, at the VA Topeka campus and throughout October and early November at the VA Leavenworth campus, drive-through flu vaccines will be available for veterans enrolled in the VA Eastern Kansas Health Care System. These same drive-through options will be available at several VA community-based clinics on select Saturdays in October.

Due to COVID-19, flu vaccines will not be available on a walk-in basis this year. However, veterans who have a scheduled appointment with their provider can receive a flu vaccine while in the clinic, or at any primary care, behavioral health or specialty clinic. Appointments will not be made for a flu vaccine alone. Flu vaccines will be available through March 31, 2021.

Anyone with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 or has been exposed within two weeks is asked to stay home as instructed and to not go for a flu vaccine to any location until released from quarantine. Anyone who thinks they might have COVID-19 should contact their VA team or local medical care provider. For a list of possible symptoms of COVID-19 and mandatory precautions for the drive-through clinics, call the Flu Information Hotline at 800-574-8387 ext. 53243.

Veterans should bring a VA identification card and wear clothing that allows staff to reach their upper arm.

Times and locations are as below:

Topeka VA Medical Center, 2200 SW Gage Blvd., Topeka, Kan., Building 3, outside entrance, circular drive (outside lab site).

  • Saturday, Oct. 3, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, Oct. 10, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, Oct. 24, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, Nov. 7, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Drive-through flu shots will also be available 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Topeka VA Medical Center, Sept. 21 through Dec. 31.

Governor encourages flu shots to stay healthy, decrease burden on health care system

TOPEKA, Kan. – Gov. Laura Kelly today, after receiving her flu shot from a Walgreens representative, emphasized that because of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is now more important than ever for all Kansans to get a flu shot.

“Increased flu-related visits to the hospital present challenges for our health care system every year – but will be particularly difficult to cope with while we are in the midst of an unprecedented global pandemic,” Kelly said. “I encourage all Kansans to receive a flu shot and protect the health and safety of our communities, while also decreasing the burden on our health care workers, freeing them up to treat patients who have contracted COVID-19.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control, flu vaccination prevented an estimated 4.4 million influenza illnesses during the 2018-2019 flu season, and stopped 3,500 flu-related deaths.

Kelly also expressed her appreciation for all frontline workers issuing flu shots this year.

County seeks committee members to review local businesses’ CARES Act applications

Osage County Commissioners are seeking interested citizens to serve on a committee to review and make recommendations on applications for Osage County’s CARES Act Economic Development Relief Program. The county’s federal CARES Act budget of around $3 million includes $1,050,000 for the economic development relief fund.

Commissioners announced last week that applications were being accepted from businesses for the local relief fund, with grant limitations, conditions, and total grant funds to be announced. See related story here.

Commissioners announced this week in a notice in a local newspaper they would be considering letters of interest from persons interested in serving on the committee, with a deadline of 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020, for the letters to be submitted to the county clerk’s office.

Citizens interested in serving on the committee are asked to submit a letter to the commissioners in care of the Osage County Clerk’s Office, by mail to PO Box 226, Lyndon, KS 66451 or delivering it in person.

Applicants must be Osage County residents to be eligible to serve on the committee, and preference will be given to individuals who are not applying for the CARES Act Economic Development Relief Program.

For more information, contact the Osage County Clerk’s Office at 785-828-4812.

Eat Well to Be Well: Be kind to your kidneys; extra TLC pays off in a lifetime of good health

Let’s face it, countless articles have been written on safeguarding the health of your heart and brain. While heart and brain health are absolutely crucial for overall well-being, what about your kidneys? Kidney health is just as vital and yet is often underappreciated or ignored.

Roughly the size of a large fist, your kidneys are the workhorse of your body’s filtration system, responsible for getting rid of waste products, drugs, and toxins through the urine. Besides the buildup of wastes, extra fluid in the body is also prevented thanks to the kidneys. Each day, healthy kidneys filter about a half cup of blood every minute, removing wastes and extra water to make urine. They also maintain a healthy balance of electrolytes (sodium, potassium, and phosphate) in addition to making red blood cells, producing hormones regulating blood pressure, and keeping bones strong.

Are you at risk for chronic kidney disease?

Good kidney functioning is important. But neglect their health and you could develop a condition called chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD is when kidneys become damaged and struggle to filter blood, leading to wastes building up in your body and causing other health problems. Damaged kidneys may cause swollen ankles, weakness, poor sleep and shortness of breath. If left untreated, kidney health will worsen and can be life-threatening.

CKD is often progressive over time, possibly leading to kidney failure with the only treatment options being dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Diabetes and high blood pressure are the most common causes of CKD. More than 35 percent of people over the age of 20 with diabetes and more than 20 percent of people age 20 and older with hypertension have CKD. Other causes may include a family history of kidney failure, being older than 60, kidney stones, lupus and other autoimmune diseases.

Osage County encourages eligible businesses to apply for local CARES Act funds

Osage County has announced it has been allocated money through the federal CARES Act to establish an Osage County Small Business Economic Development Relief Grant Program. The program is to assist with immediate and anticipated needs of existing Osage County small businesses negatively impacted by COV1D-19. Negatively impacted small businesses are defined as those with less than 50 employees.

An application is now available on Osage County’s website, osageco.org, under the CARES ACT INFORMATION link. Interested businesses are instructed to download and complete the application and return it by email to [email protected] or in hard copy to the Osage County Clerk’s office. For more information about completing the application, contact Garrett Nordstrom, Governmental Assistance Services, at 816-805-9183, or email [email protected].

CARES ACT grants can be used to pay for working capital, inventory, wages, utilities, rent, and other expenses. To receive funding distributions, businesses must be willing to share financial information such as invoices and payroll amounts to ensure compliance.

Grant award maximums, further details and deadlines will be available as the program is developed by the Osage County Economic Development Relief Grant Program Committee. All grant funds are to be distributed by Dec. 30, 2020.

Interested businesses are encouraged to submit their applications quickly to be considered for relief funds. These funds are available through the Coronavirus Relief Fund of the federal CARES Act. 

Applications open for grants to support businesses affected by COVID

TOPEKA, Kan. – Governor Laura Kelly today encouraged Kansas businesses to participate in the application process for more than $130 million in grants to support businesses affected by the pandemic and enable companies to expand broadband access in the state. The portal to apply opens at noon Wednesday, August 19.

The application portal for the SPARK economic development and connectivity grant programs will appear online at kansascommerce.gov/covidrelief.

“This is an opportunity to revitalize our economy and for businesses to receive some necessary relief,” Kelly said. “I strongly encourage business owners to apply first thing Wednesday if they are eligible.”

In addition to providing financial relief, grants will be available to businesses whose products and services will be needed in greater volume to help combat the virus and its effects. Funding is also being made available to expand broadband access both through infrastructure improvements and by partnerships with internet service providers to serve low-income households. These grants are funded through the Coronavirus Relief Fund of the federal CARES Act.

This pandemic has affected each sector differently, with industries having distinct needs. Therefore, applications for grants are being made available in the following categories:

Small Business Working Capital Grants

Kansas businesses with fewer than 500 employees are eligible to apply for Small Business Working Capital grants. Funds can be used to pay working capital expenses such as payroll, rent, mortgage insurance, utilities, inventory, and more. Grants will be awarded on a rolling basis until funds are depleted.

Eat Well to Be Well:Here’s the scoop on adding extra PROTEIN POWER to your day

Some very best sources are likely in your kitchen already

From high protein shakes, high protein bars and high protein diets, protein continues to dominate as a super nutrient. Yes, protein is an invaluable nutrient, as it does a ton of various functions within our body. It’s needed for growth and maintenance, acts as enzymes and hormones, enhances immune functioning, and is an essential compound found in every single one of the trillions of cells in the human body.

The best diet for supplying adequate protein contains ample but not excessive amounts necessary to build and repair muscle tissue. Most people eating daily moderate amounts of protein get adequate protein. As humans, we do not store protein so it’s best to consume protein at each meal, evenly distributed throughout the day.

But how much do you need daily? An easy guideline based on the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein is about 7 grams per 20 pounds of body weight. Therefore, a person weighing 150 pounds would need at least 52 grams of protein each day.

What are the best sources of protein to be eating? First, you can skip the protein powders and high-protein drinks. On occasion they may be fine, but there are far healthier (and cheaper) natural protein-rich sources found right in your kitchen. Here’s a look at eight protein powerhouses, both plant- and animal-based:

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas