Category Archives: Featured

Osage City opens up for bargain hunters with weekend garage sales

Osage City is opening its garage doors, driveways and yards to shoppers Friday and Saturday. The town’s fall citywide garage sales will be Friday and Saturday, Sept. 18-19, 2020, with the Osage City Chamber of Commerce serving as community hosts.

The Chamber has produced at map that lists sales all over town and designates which section of town and the types of goods for sale. Maps will be available at Casey’s and other Osage City businesses Friday and Saturday.

Donations received for listing sales and for advertising on the map are used for a scholarship for a graduating senior from Osage City High School.

For more information, contact Tricia Gundy, Osage City Chamber garage sale committee chairperson, at 785-528-3301, or Peterson Assisted Living, 629 Holliday St., Osage City.

OCHS golfers take 2nd at West Franklin tournament at Lamont Hill

OCHS Lady Indians golf team 2020 with medals from the West Franklin tournament, courtesy photo.

Osage City High School Lady Indian golfers competed Sept. 8, 2020, in the West Franklin tournament at Lamont Hill, with OCHS golfer Laci Davenport taking first place. The Osage City team took second place in the tournament, just two strokes behind the tournament team champion Silver Lake.

Davenport took the championship with a score of 47. Other OCHS medalists were Jenna Hastert, who placed ninth with a score of 54, and Hayden Serna at 12th with 56.

Council Grove took third place in the tournament.  

Marais des Cygnes Valley FFA officer team attends retreat in Oklahoma

McCV FFA officers, from left, Lindsey Johnson, Izzy Toman, Braden Reed, Wyatt Lingenfelter, Brice Marsh, Cole Lacey, and Kyler Anschutz.

By Braden Reed, MdCV FFA Reporter

The 2020-2021 Marais des Cygnes Valley FFA officer team went out of state for their annual retreat this year, exploring Sand Springs State Park, in Oklahoma. The team included Isabella Toman, president, Cole Lacey, vice president, Brice Marsh, secretary, Wyatt Lingenfeler, treasurer, Braden Reed, reporter, Kyler Anschutz, sentinel, and Lindsey Johnson, student council.

Because of the coronavirus pandemic, the team did not tour anywhere on the way to and back from Oklahoma. After arriving in Oklahoma, the team spent the next three days, July 22-24, 2020, swimming, cruising, eating, working on leadership activities and their program of activities, and Cornhole, lots of Cornhole.

There were a lot of new activities as well as adjustments to previous activities – a few of the activities planned for this year are Farmageddon, organizational movie night, and Ag Awareness Day.

On the way back home they stopped at The Pioneer Woman Mercantile, in Pawhuska, Okla. They looked around town where there were a lot of shops and restaurants, and went to Charlie’s Sweet Ice Cream Shop, where the ice cream cones and sundaes were huge.

The officers and members are looking forward to an exciting FFA experience and successful school year.

Eat Well to Be Well: Be kind to your kidneys; extra TLC pays off in a lifetime of good health

Let’s face it, countless articles have been written on safeguarding the health of your heart and brain. While heart and brain health are absolutely crucial for overall well-being, what about your kidneys? Kidney health is just as vital and yet is often underappreciated or ignored.

Roughly the size of a large fist, your kidneys are the workhorse of your body’s filtration system, responsible for getting rid of waste products, drugs, and toxins through the urine. Besides the buildup of wastes, extra fluid in the body is also prevented thanks to the kidneys. Each day, healthy kidneys filter about a half cup of blood every minute, removing wastes and extra water to make urine. They also maintain a healthy balance of electrolytes (sodium, potassium, and phosphate) in addition to making red blood cells, producing hormones regulating blood pressure, and keeping bones strong.

Are you at risk for chronic kidney disease?

Good kidney functioning is important. But neglect their health and you could develop a condition called chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD is when kidneys become damaged and struggle to filter blood, leading to wastes building up in your body and causing other health problems. Damaged kidneys may cause swollen ankles, weakness, poor sleep and shortness of breath. If left untreated, kidney health will worsen and can be life-threatening.

CKD is often progressive over time, possibly leading to kidney failure with the only treatment options being dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Diabetes and high blood pressure are the most common causes of CKD. More than 35 percent of people over the age of 20 with diabetes and more than 20 percent of people age 20 and older with hypertension have CKD. Other causes may include a family history of kidney failure, being older than 60, kidney stones, lupus and other autoimmune diseases.

Chamber challenges disc golfers in second annual tournament on Osage City course

About 25 disc golfers enjoyed a beautiful morning of sunshine and nice temperatures Saturday, Aug. 22, 2020, during the 2nd annual Osage City Chamber Challenge Disc Golf Tournament, held at Jones Park disc golf course.

The Osage City Chamber of Commerce hosted the tournament, presenting prizes for the winners. Everyone went home with a raffle item donated by Flint Hills Beverage.

The winners for the three levels of participants were:

Advance Male

  • First, Troy Smart; second, Travis Bilyeu; third, Jacob Wade

Intermediate Male

  • First, David Hastings; second, Steve Morrison; third, Ben Corbett

Intermediate Female

  • First, Kelli Orender

Beginner Male

  • First, Kurt Kitselman; second, Jared Kitselman; third, Jim Lohmeyer

Beginner Female

  • First, Dani Kerns; second, Becky Siljenberg; third, Jodi Lohmeyer

Winners of the select events were:

  • Female Longest Drive, Kelli Orender
  • Male Longest Drive, Troy Smart
  • Closest to the hole, Kurt Kitselman
  • Putting Contest, Troy Smart

Hidden History: Burlingame veteran’s fight for honor continued in civilian life

Burlingame Cemetery holds more than 250 veterans of the Civil War. Approximately 10 of those soldiers served in the United States Colored Troops. While that number seems relatively small, the ratio in comparison to other area cemeteries is quite high. Those that served in the Colored Troops fought for their freedom and had to overcome many obstacles including changing perceptions of how people felt about differences in race. One of these Burlingame Colored Troops veterans is Isaac Williams.

Isaac’s origins are uncertain, as is often the case with those formerly enslaved. The first evidence of Isaac is when he enlisted for the war effort at Benton Barracks in St. Louis, Missouri, with the 4th Missouri Colored Troops in December of 1863, which later became the 68th USCT. Some men serving in this regiment are noted to have been from eight central Missouri counties, however St. Louis was also a way station for the fugitive slaves coming in from the South on their way to free territory to the north or west. Isaac was transferred to the 67th USCT and mustered out at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, at the end of the war.

After his service, Isaac found work and assistance from abolitionists in Osage and Lyon counties, in Kansas.

In 1865, Isaac was living near Waveland (near Wakarusa) with Charles C. Gardiner. Gardiner was a civil engineer, receiving training at Alfred University in New York, one of the few schools at the time that was integrated. Gardiner came to Kansas in 1859 and settled north of Burlingame. He removed to Missouri just before the war and served with two units of the loyalist Missouri home guards. At the end of the war, Gardiner was stationed at St. Louis, where he likely met Isaac.

While in Missouri, Gardiner married Lydia Buffington, a Quaker woman whose family assisted fugitives on the Underground Railroad. The Gardiners returned to Kansas in 1865, settling at Waveland, where they opened their home to Isaac and at least two other refugees.

From the Gardiner household, Isaac went to work in Lyon County for Nicholas Lockerman, around 1870. Lockerman supported the free state cause and was a wealthy stockman with a ferry that crossed the river on his property.

Isaac’s time in Lyon County was short – in the late 1870s he returned to the area north of Burlingame and rented land from O.H. Sheldon, a businessman who helped shape early Osage County.

Former Kansas governor Charles Robinson said of Sheldon, “When the wave of corruption swept over our young state, more blighting in its effects, if possible, than the curse of human slavery, against which successful war had been waged, no smell of fire was found upon his garments.”

Osage County encourages eligible businesses to apply for local CARES Act funds

Osage County has announced it has been allocated money through the federal CARES Act to establish an Osage County Small Business Economic Development Relief Grant Program. The program is to assist with immediate and anticipated needs of existing Osage County small businesses negatively impacted by COV1D-19. Negatively impacted small businesses are defined as those with less than 50 employees.

An application is now available on Osage County’s website, osageco.org, under the CARES ACT INFORMATION link. Interested businesses are instructed to download and complete the application and return it by email to [email protected] or in hard copy to the Osage County Clerk’s office. For more information about completing the application, contact Garrett Nordstrom, Governmental Assistance Services, at 816-805-9183, or email [email protected].

CARES ACT grants can be used to pay for working capital, inventory, wages, utilities, rent, and other expenses. To receive funding distributions, businesses must be willing to share financial information such as invoices and payroll amounts to ensure compliance.

Grant award maximums, further details and deadlines will be available as the program is developed by the Osage County Economic Development Relief Grant Program Committee. All grant funds are to be distributed by Dec. 30, 2020.

Interested businesses are encouraged to submit their applications quickly to be considered for relief funds. These funds are available through the Coronavirus Relief Fund of the federal CARES Act. 

COVID-19 update: Cases on steady rise in Osage County

Senior center set to reopen after precautionary closure

Active cases of COVID-19 are again steadily rising in Osage County, with the health department reporting eight current positive cases yesterday, Aug. 10, 2020, along with 11 people quarantined.

As of yesterday, Osage County Health Department had recorded a total of 45 positive cases since Osage County’s first diagnosed case March 23.

In its Monday report, Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported six of Osage County’s cases have required hospitalization. OCHD reported yesterday there were currently no patients hospitalized, and 37 Osage County patients have recovered from the infection. No deaths in the county have been attributed to the virus.

The health department also reported the Osage County Senior Center would reopen on Aug. 12, after being shutdown July 30 due to a possible cluster of COVID-19 cases. The health department said no new cases have been associated with the senior center. In announcing the closure, the health department said three cases were possibly associated to the senior center. People who visited the senior center anytime between July 20 and July 27, 2020, were asked to self-quarantine and monitor themselves for symptoms.

Osage County unofficial results for Aug. 4, 2020, primary election

Many Osage County voters turned out with masks to exercise their right to vote during a worldwide pandemic for the Aug. 4, 2020, statewide primary election, and delivered upsets in some local offices. Notably, in the Republican race for Osage County Sheriff, Chris Wells led the race over Osage County’s longtime sheriff Laurie Dunn, 1,955 votes to 1,154. The county’s two commissioner races also saw voters’ approval of the challengers for the positions. In the Republican commissioner District 3 race, Jay Bailey, 571 votes, defeated commissioner Ken Kuykendall, 309, and challenger Brandon Smith, 215. In the Republican commissioner District 2 race, Heather Kuder defeated Gaylord Anderson, 626 votes to 375.

The following results represent tallies reported by the Osage County Election Office on election evening and are unofficial until canvassed by the Osage County Commissioners. These results represent Osage County votes only and do not include write-in votes and provisional ballots.

Eat Well to Be Well: It’s a berry good time of year

If a grocery store advertisement reads, “Today’s special: a food low in calories, no fat, full of fiber, may help prevent diseases, aids in weight loss, and tastes delicious,” would you buy it? I would hope so as this ad is talking about one of the most healthful foods nature provides – berries.

Berries are just about the perfect food to eat, whether fresh or frozen, and the variety to choose from is outstanding – blackberries, blueberries, boysenberries, cranberries, gooseberries, loganberries, raspberries, and strawberries.

Berries’ special power

Berries have been around as a food source for centuries. Their attractive appearance and delicate burst of sweetness has made them a favorite fruit even today. But, what distinguishes berries from other fruits is their health-boosting ability thanks to their rich and diverse antioxidant power.

Antioxidants reduce damage due to oxygen often caused by free radicals. Antioxidants include ascorbic acid (vitamin C), carotenoids, vitamin E and phenolic compounds, all found in berries – vitamin C and phenolic compounds are particularly abundant. Phenolic compounds include phenolic acids, flavonoids, tannins and resveratrol. Berries’ antioxidant power is that special boost in keeping us healthy.

Gov. Kelly signs executive order mandating masks in public spaces

Simple, proactive way to keep Kansans safe, and keep Kansas businesses open

TOPEKA, Kan. – Gov. Laura Kelly today issued Executive Order No. 20-52 requiring that most Kansans must wear a mask while in public spaces, and in places where individuals are unable to maintain social distancing of six feet.

The order takes effect at 12:01 a.m. Friday, July 3, 2020, and will remain in place until rescinded or until the current statewide state of disaster emergency expires – whichever is earlier.

“The last few months have presented many new challenges for Kansans, and all of us want to return to our normal lives and routines,” Kelly said. “Unfortunately, we have seen a spike in the number of COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths across our state and our country. We must act.

‘Viruses don’t stop at county lines. This order doesn’t change where you can go or what you can do. But wearing a mask is a simple and effective way to keep Kansans healthy and keep Kansas open for business.”

Under the order, Kansans are required to wear masks when inside any public space – including their workplace – or in situations where social distancing of six feet cannot be maintained. Guidance regarding specific places or situations in which masks are required is outlined within the order.

Kansans under five years of age, those with medical conditions, and others specifically outlined in the order are exempt from these requirements.

Hidden History: Young doctor’s ‘upward’ attitude brings hospital to Osage City

The Star Block, at 520 Market Street, Osage City, center of photo, was once an early day medical center (or doctor’s office), operated by Dr. Roup for a year or so sometime around the early 1890s. Photo thanks to the Osage County Historical Society.

At one time, Osage County was home to not one but two hospitals. Both were located in Osage City and served the surrounding area. Barnes Hospital was owned by Miles W. Barnes, a young Tennessee doctor who operated his hospital in the 1920s and into the 1930s. His building was located at 110 S. Sixth Street. Brown Hospital was established in 1917 on Main Street and operated by Thomas O. Brown, a former Osage County schoolteacher.

Thomas Brown grew up in Lyndon, the son of farming parents. He excelled in school and after graduation became a local teacher at No. 68 (or Jack Rabbit) and Vassar schools. In 1892, Tom married Jessie Jones, of Arvonia, a sister of his good friend. Those that knew Tom Brown knew him to be “a competent and thorough teacher and his motto was ‘Onward and Upward’.” Not only did Tom encourage his students with those words, he followed them himself. It was in Arvonia that Tom crossed paths with Dr. William R. Roup, town physician, and likely decided upon a new career path.

Dr. Roup, like Tom Brown, had a thirst for knowledge that had led him to the pursuit of the expanding field of medicine. Dr. Roup received his medical degree in 1869 from the University of Iowa at a time when the medical profession was largely unregulated. Doctors during this time were generally classified according to those receiving formal medical training, such as Dr. Roup, and eclectic medicine, which utilized botanical remedies and physical therapy. In the early 1870s, Dr. Roup established a practice in Reading. He also practiced in Osage City for a year in the newly built Star Block, and in 1892-94 moved to Arvonia, where he influenced Tom Brown to follow a career in medicine.

Roadside sales not permitted on Kansas highway right of way

The Kansas Department of Transportation is reminding the public that according to state law, all rights of way on state highways are to be used exclusively for highway purposes. KDOT has jurisdiction over all interstate, Kansas and U.S. routes on the state’s 9,500-mile system.

The violation that occurs frequently is the placement of various signs that are removed and taken to local KDOT offices. However, it is also unlawful for any persons to display on highway right of way outside the city limits any goods, wares or merchandise for sale.

One exception to this is the sale of farm or garden products, but these type of sales must be made exclusively at the entrance to the farm or garden where they were produced, as long as the sales are conducted a safe distance from the traveled way.

Any other location of these sales violates state law and will be removed by KDOT or law enforcement.

Human bone found near rural Osage County fishing spot; identity, age unknown

The location a human bone was found Tuesday was near 205th Street and Lewelling Road near the west end of Pomona Lake. Image from Google Maps.

Osage County Sheriff Laurie Dunn has reported that a human bone was found Tuesday in rural Osage County near a popular fishing spot on U.S. Army Corps of Engineer property along Dragoon Creek.

In a press release today, June 18, 2020, Dunn said the sheriff’s office responded at 12:30 p.m. June 16 to a report of a bone found near 205th Street and Lewelling Road, approximately 1.5 miles west of U.S. Highway 75.

The sheriff said the bone had been viewed by the coroner’s office and a forensic anthropologist and was determined to be human.

The area was secured overnight for a more detailed search. The sheriff’s office was assisted at by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism, Mission Township Fire Department dive team, Missouri Search and Rescue K-9, and a cadaver dog from the Kansas State Fire Marshal’s Office. Nothing else was found on land or in the water, the sheriff reported, and the area was released at 7:30 p.m. June 17.

The sheriff said the exact age of the bone is yet to be determined, and it is not known where the bone may have come from due to flooding last year.

Dunn said the forensic anthropologist gave a timeframe of 60 to 90 days to determine more specifics about the bone.

Help House: Hungry for sports? Fans’ friendly rivalry means ‘game on’ for afghan raffle

Are you missing your sports teams, competition and rivalries they create?

Help House has come up with its own “game on” to help pass the time until athletes are back on the hardwoods and fields. Whether you are a diehard KU Jayhawk or a KSU Cat backer, Help House has just the thing to help get you ready to cheer on your team.

One of our great volunteers, Peggy Kampsen, of Vassar, Kan., who last year provided us with a hand crocheted American Flag afghan to raffle off as a fundraiser, has out done herself this year. She has created two very specially designed afghans to see which team will win. The KSU afghan is 45 inches by 50 inches and the  KU afghan is 46 inches by 54 inches. Peggy does beautiful work and they can be yours. Vote on both if you live in a house divided.

Buy tickets now to help your team win big. Tickets are $1 for one or $5 for six. Our volunteers are selling them now, so be sure to ask for yours. If you don’t know one of our volunteers, call Help House at  785-828-4888 and ask how you can get yours. Let us know how many you want we will get them to you.

A drawing for the afghans will be Aug. 14, 2020.

Eat Well to Be Well: Savor the sweet sensation of spring strawberries

Spring strawberries – what’s not to love? There’s more to this ruby-red fruit than meets the eye – they’re the first fruit to ripen in the spring, they are a member of the rose family, and one cup of strawberries is packed with more vitamin C than an orange – 55 milligrams compared to 85 milligrams.

If there’s one berry most people have a fondness for, it’s strawberries. Up to 94 percent of American households consume strawberries making them a top notch favorite fruit. May, National Strawberry Month, is dedicated to promoting and celebrating this favorite berry. Here are some interesting facts about strawberries you may not have known:

  • Strawberries are grown in every state in the United States.
  • California is the state that produces the most strawberries – an amazing 1 billion pounds of strawberries each year.
  • If all strawberries produced in California in one year were laid berry to berry, they would go around the world 15 times.
  • There is an average number of 200 seeds in a strawberry.

Even though available year round, strawberries full flavor shines best beginning in May through late summer, the prime seasons for strawberries. Now is when farmers markets and grocery store produce aisles are loaded with this red delicacy at its peak of taste and appearance. A carton of freshly picked strawberries is a sight to behold, turning even the pickiest eater into a fan.

Yes, strawberries are a spring and summertime favorite not only for its juicy sweet flavor and versatility, but don’t forget the tremendous nutritional profile it packs as a berry.

Hidden History: Osage County hospitality served with side of Southern pride

The road to Santa Fe was forged right through the middle of Osage County, and by 1822 the route was secured, opening travel for wagon traffic. Starting in 1825, the route was surveyed and mapped, treaties were made with the Native American tribes to secure safe passage, and modifications along the route such as bridges were constructed for easier travel.

After the establishment of the trail, the land in what would become Osage County became part of a tract land reserved for the Shawnee. The Shawnee favored settlement along waterways and had long been active in trade with Euro-Americans, so trail crossings like those at Switzler and 110 Mile Creek were a natural location for settlement.

The name for 110 Mile Creek, originally called Jones Creek, received its new name indicating its distance along the Santa Fe Trail from Fort Osage, in Missouri. The location was lined with a considerable amount of timber and had a few Shawnee houses with their fields nearby. The grove at 110-Mile Creek was well known to the military and saw regular use as a camping spot.

Aside from those of native blood, no other individuals were supposed to enter reservation lands without ties to the local Indian agency or the military. Some, like a man named Richardson and his compatriot who settled at the 110 Mile crossing, found their way around this by taking wives among the Shawnee. The pair had conducted a toll stop on the trail at that location, built a story and a half tall building and another smaller one near it.

The Richardson claim was sold to a man named Fry P. McGee in the summer of 1854 in anticipation of the land being opened up for general settlement. McGee had spotted the location on a return trip from Oregon where he had previously taken his family. McGee, apparently not content with the land, returned the following year and acquired the property in Kansas Territory. McGee assumed Richardson’s claim but retained the name Richardson for the area. McGee’s arrival was not only one desiring the favorable location, but a move intent on helping secure Kansas’ admittance to the Union as a slave state.

Despite life’s abnormal situation, Melvern remembers the fallen for Memorial Day

Volunteers place flags on veterans’ graves Saturday. Photo thanks to Lisa Reeser.

2020 has not been as normal as most people would have hoped due to COVID-19.  Yet in the Melvern community this didn’t stop community members both young and old, from coming together Saturday morning, May 23, to help the Woodward-Belt-Hellman-Arb American Legion No. 317 and Ladies Auxiliary  prepare Melvern Cemetery for honoring all of our fallen veterans. Volunteers helped place individual flags on all veterans’ graves and then hung flags along state Highway 31.

Osage County confirms 7th COVID-19 case; 6 recovered

The Osage County Health Department has reported that a seventh positive COVID-19 case has been confirmed in the county.

In a social media post May 18, 2020, the health department reported the infected individual is a 51-year-old female who lives in the southern part of Osage County. She was reported as doing well and quarantined at home.

The post said the health department is working on contact tracing and will contact anyone who has had significant contact with the patient.

As of yesterday, May 20, the department reported that Osage County has had six recovered cases, with currently only one positive case and four people under ordered quarantine. The county reports 331 negative test results.

The department reported Osage County does not have any evidence of local transmission of the virus.

Help House News: Community cooperation completes parking project

By Raylene Quaney

We are thrilled to have the parking area paved, as well as two parking lot lights and a security system that has views of all four sides of the building installed and completed.

Thank you to Ted Hazelton for all his efforts to secure the grant money and head up the building committee; Jerry Bilyeu, Johnny Neill, Raylene Quaney and Nancy Alley for serving on the committee; Lance Jones, Curtis Janssen, Ryan Jones and Dan Coffman for their help at different times to complete this project; James Kline and Signature Concrete for the construction; and Don Bailey who installed the security system and helped with the parking lot lights. Thank you also to Judge Taylor and Heather Wine for donating the usage of their golf cart, and to Lyndon Storage for donating the space to park the golf cart for two weeks. Thank you also to the Osage County Sheriff’s Department, which has been delivering food to those who cannot  come to Help House, and collecting food and personal items for Help House. Thank you to Pastor Jonathon Moore and the congregation of the Lyndon First Baptist Church who donated to Help House additional property to complete the dimensions for the parking lot. God bless you!

Help House will continue with scheduled curbside food orders for the rest of the month of May, however we will be going back to our normal hours, 4-7 p.m. Monday evenings and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, beginning this week.

We are at this time planning on allowing people to enter the building on June 1. We will continue to operate by scheduling visits and only allow individuals into the building if they are wearing a mask or face covering and gloves. They will be limited to 30 minute appointment that includes both food pantry and shopping outside of the pantry. Those who only want to shop on the floor will also need to make an appointment. Only one family member will be allowed to enter and shop.

If you are like a lot of us, we have been cleaning and purging our homes while we were under shelter in place orders and we have been hearing from a lot of you wondering when we will be taking donations again on items other than donations of food. This will happen  on June 1. 

Cook’n’ show cancelled, so car buffs cruise Osage County

Local auto enthusiasts lined up cars of all makes and models, Saturday, May 9, 2020, at Jones Park, Osage City,  where they departed on a cruise around Osage County. 

By Jeanette Swartz

Since the Cruis’n & Cook’n Car Show was cancelled in April due to the pandemic, this past Saturday afternoon, May 9, 2020, brought a group of approximately 40 auto enthusiasts to Osage City, Kan. Friends from Osage City, Reading, Wakarusa, Burlington, Ottawa, Pomona, Emporia, Topeka, Carbondale and Lyndon lined up at the football stadium parking lot and cruised through downtown Osage City, then traveled on to Melvern and Pomona lakes through the state parks.

We are not sure who had more fun, the cruisers or the campers. The campers enjoyed seeing the participants cruise through the campsites at both lakes. There were smiles on everyone’s faces and it was nice to get out and enjoy the afternoon.

The cruise continued through Overbook, Scranton, Burlingame and back to Osage City.

We are not sure how many miles we actually cruised going through the lakes, a few small towns and the countryside, but it was an enjoyable three-hour tour (and nobody broke down or ran out of gas!)

The generous monetary donations, canned and packaged food items from the cruisers were greatly appreciated, and which will be given back to the community through ECKAN, ECAT and the Warmth Fund.

Contact us: Osage County News | P.O. Box 62, Lyndon, KS 66451 | [email protected] | 785-828-4994 | Powered by Osage County, Kansas